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CITY DOCUMENTS 



CITY OF LOWELL, 



For the Year 1875-76. 




LOWELL, MASS.: 
1876. 



EXTRACT FROM THE ORDINANCES OF LOWELL. 



CHAPTER V. — CITY DOCUMENTS. 

Amended January 23, 1872. 

Section I . The following City Documents shall be printed in pamphlet 
form of the size of the Annual Report of the School Committee, to wit: — 
Mayor's Address; Auditor's Annual Report; Annual Report of the Directors 
of the City Library; Annual Report of the Superintendent of Burials; 
Annual Report of the Chief Engineer of the Fire Department ; and Municipal 
Register. 

Section 2. All City Documents shall annually be bound together in one 
volume, under the direction of the City Clerk, a copy of which shall be depos- 
ited in the City Library ; in the Middlesex Mechanics' Association in Lowell ; 
and one copy shall be sent to each city of the Commonwealth, the Library of 
Harvard College, the Public Library of Boston, and the Smithsonian Institute 
at Washington. 



CONTENTS. 



1. Inaugural Address of His Honor, Charles A. Stott, Mayor of the City of Lowell, to the two 

branches of the City Council, January 3, 1876. 

2. Municipal Register, containing Rules and Orders of the City Council, and a list of the Govern- 

ment and Officers of the City of Lowell, for 1876. 

3. Fiftieth Annual Report of the School Committee of the City of Lowell, together with the 

Eleventh Annual Report of the Superintendent of Public Schools, for 1875. 

4. The Auditor's Fortieth Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Lowell ; 

together with the Treasurer's Account, for the Financial Year ending December 31, 1875. 

5. Salaries of the Officers of the City of Lowell, for the year 1876-77. 

6. Annual Report of the Directors of the City Library, for the year 1875. 

7. Annual Report of the City Physician and Superintendent of Burials, for the year 1875. 

8. Annual Report of the Chief Engineer of the Lowell Fire Department, for the year ending 

March 31, 1876. 

9. Third Annual Report of the Water Board of the City of Lowell, made January 1, 1876. 

10. Semi-Centennial Report of the Overseers of the Poor of the City of Lowell. 

11. Acts and Ordinances relating to the Lowell Water Works, with the Agreement for the Settle- 

ment of the Claims for Damages sustained by the Proprietors of Locks and Canals, &c. 

12. Proceedings in the City of Lowell at the Semi-Centennial Celebration of the Incorporation of 

the Town of Lowell, March 1, 1876. 



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T II K 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



HIS HONOR 



Charles A. Stott, 



MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LOWELL, 



TWO BRANCHES OF THE CITY GOVERNMENT, 



JANUARY 3, 1876. 




LOWELL, MASS.: 
MARDEN & ROWELL, BOOK AND JOB PRINTERS, COURIER OFFICIO, 

18 7 6. 



CITY OF LOWELL 



In Common Council, January 3, 187G. 

Ordered, If the Board of Aldermen concur, That His Honor the 
Mayor, be requested to furnish a copy of his Address for publication. 

In Common Council, January 3, 1876. 

Read and adopted; sent up for concurrence. 

David Chase, Cleric. 

In Board of Aldermen, January 3, 1876. 

Read and adopted in concurrence. 

Samuel A. McPhetees, City Clerk. 



ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Council ': 

We have assembled, upon this morning of the new 
year, to organize the municipal government of our city 
for the year 1876, and our thoughts have been directed 
to that source from whence cometh all our strength, by 
the reverend gentlemen whose petition in our behalf 
has been so freely and kindly rendered. May we ever 
remember the saying, " He that is faithful over a few 
things shall be made ruler over many." The year 1S76 
is one of unusual importance to us as citizens of a 
municipality,- and of a nation, for upon the first of 
March will occur the semi-centennial of the incorpora- 
tion of the town of Lowell, and upon the fourth of 
July the centennial of the independence of these 
United States. 

Two events of so much importance seldom occur 
in the same year, and their appropriate celebration 
should at once become a matter of duty and of pride. 



6 MAYORS ADDRESS. 

None of us will be here to participate in the two hun- 
dredth anniversary of our independence, and in all 
human probability but few at the centennial of our city; 
therefore we should celebrate both of these events in a 
becoming manner, and to that end I would recommend 
a .suitable appropriation. It may be deemed advisable 
on acount of the shortness of the time to merge the 
celebrations into one, and make July 4th the day of our 
rejoicing. Your pleasure in this matter will certainly 
be mine. 

In calling the attention of the City Council to such 
matters as custom and the wants of the city seem to 
dictate, I shall have to crave your kind indulgence for 
its imperfect performance, in fact there will be many 
subjects entirely omitted for want of information on my 
part, but as I become more enlightened in regard to 
the wants of the city, it will be my duty as well as 
pleasure to communicate to you from time to time, 
such matters as in my judgment require the attention 
the City Council. 

SCHOOLS. 

The means of acquiring a good education cannot 
be too highly estimated as among the greatest blessings 
bestowed upon any community, and I believe our citi- 



MAYOR S ADDRESS. 7 

zens submit more cheerfully to taxation, in support oi 
schools, than for many other purposes. The cost oi 
this department for tuition alone has increased forty-six 
cents per scholar over last year, and $5.38 over 1867. 
This is largely accounted for in the increase of salaries 
paid to teachers, which is regulated by a co-ordinate 
branch of this orovernment. Whether or not this de- 
partment should not bear its share in the general policy 
of retrenchment, is for them to determine. 

With a population of 49,677 of whom 7729 have 
attended school during the past year, and with an in- 
crease of 773 in the number of children between the 
ages of 5 and 15 years, it will be readily seen that the 
number of schools cannot be diminished but must nec- 
essarily be increased. While I would advise nothing 
that would lower the high rank which our schools now 
hold, I trust that we shall have the co-operation of the 
School Committee in the general desire of our people 
for lighter taxation. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

While the school houses of the city are not all 
as pleasant and commodious as we could desire, still, 
generally speaking, they are in good condition, some of 
them are indeed a source of gratification and pride. 



8 MAYOR S ADDRESS. 

During the past year a new primary school house 
has been erected on Common street, at a cost of about 
$32,000, including the land, and furnishes superior 
accommodations for the children of that locality. 

The Superintendent of Schools informs me that 
additional primary accommodations will be needed in 
Centralville, Ward Three, and Ward Four, during the 
year. 

There is also a prospective demand for more High 
school accommodation, which he suggests might be 
obtained by the building of another High school house, 
to be located in the western part of the city, and espec- 
ially designed for girls. This matter I have no doubt 
will practically be brought to the attention of succeed- 
ing City Councils. 

STREETS. 

It is a well-established maxim that " whatever is 
worth doing at all, is worth doing well." So in regard 
to our street improvements, whatever we do, let it be 
done thoroughly. It is better that we should continue 
paving such of our streets as most need it, rather than 
allow what ought to be done this year to go over to the 
next. 



MAYOR S ADDRESS. 9 

With seventy-two miles of accepted streets our 
expenditures must necessarily be large, while at the 
same time conducted with economy. 

During the past year there have been 13,768 yards 
of granite paving laid at a cost of from $2.10 to $2.16 
per yard, and 4,104 yards of wood paving, at a cost of 
from $2.1 2 1 to $2.20 per yard. From these prices it 
must be readily seen which is the cheaper for our use. 
I would suggest to the Committee on Streets the advis- 
ability of making deposits of gravel in different sec- 
tions of the city, this to be used on our streets during 
the spring and summer. By so doing this would furnish 
employment to man) 7 who would otherwise be com- 
pelled to ask assistance of the city, and enable the 
work on streets to be done with much greater facility. 
With the annexation of new territory, and the open- 
ing up of new lands, the City Council will be called 
upon to accept many new streets, and I think we shall 
avoid a great deal of trouble for ourselves and the 
owners of land, if we by resolution fix the width of all 
streets to be hereafter accepted by the city, at not less 
than forty feet from curb to curb, and sidewalks from 
six to eight feet in width. A great many of our side- 
walks are made without edgestones, and in many cases 
it will be but a few years before these will have to be 



IO MAYORS ADDRESS. 

set, and then at the expense of the city. To avoid this 
expense would it not be wise to require all sidewalks 
hereafter accepted to have edgestones? 

SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

I am indebted to the City Engineer for the follow- 
ing facts and suggestions in regard to this department: 
During the year 1875, sewers have been built in differ- 
ent parts of the city as follows: West Fourth street, 
Second street, River street, East Merrimack street, 
Pleasant street, Cabot street, Salem street, Merrimack 
street, Moody street, Fletcher street, School street, 
Broadway, Little street, Lewis street, Hurd street, 
Chapel street, Gorham street, Grove street, Loring 
street, making a total length of 2.10 miles. At this 
rate it will take about sixteen years to complete the 
proposed sewerage system. The water pipes are being 
extended into the suburbs, which makes it necessary 
that the main or outlet sewers should be built as fast as 
possible so as to give an opportunity to drain the ter- 
ritory along their routes. I would suggest that the 
outlet sewer in Suffolk street be extended the coming 
season from Broadway to Liberty square, and the out- 
let sewer in Jackson street from Bowditch street to 
King street, and also that sewers be built as follows: 



mayor's ADDRESS. I I 



Fletcher street from Broadway to Varney street, Var- 
ney street from Fletcher street to Mount Vernon 
street, Mount Vernon street from Broadway to Gold 
street, Cushing street, Lagrange street, Merrimack 
street to Cabot street, East Merrimack street from Con- 
cord river to Fayette street, Fayette street from East 
Merrimack street to Everett street, and Coburn street 
from River street to Jewett street. 

The estimated cost of the above-named sewers is 
about $70,000. The total length of sewers built is 
17.3 miles; the total length of proposed sewers in the 
system is 51.3 miles, leaving 34 miles to be built. 
These figures do not include any sewers for the re- 
cently annexed territory which will have to be pro- 
vided for before many years. Within the next five 
years it will probably be necessary to build about 
fifteen miles of sewers to meet the wants of the people 
and to protect the health of the city, at an estimated 
cost of about $375,000. 

By the foregoing statement of Mr. Evans, you 
will perceive that large appropriations will be needed 
for several }^ears to come. This is one of those mat- 
ters that cannot be put off, but each year must take 
care of itself. It is true that we shall receive about 
two-fifths of the cost from the abutters, which will call 
for about $50,000 a year from the city. The Commit- 



12 MAYORS ADDRESS. 

tee on Sewers under the city charter, will be a special 
committee of the Board of Aldermen, and I would 
suggest to them that so far as possible they pros- 
ecute the sewerage work during the cold weather, for 
much of it can be done to nearly as good advantage, 
besides giving work for people at a time of the year 
when they need it most. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

During the past year a much larger expenditure 
has been made on public buildings than will be required 
for some time to come, as extensive improvements 
have been made in the market house building, thereby 
securing a pleasant and commodious court room. The 
expense of this alteration was $9,842.40. On Middle 
street in the alteration of building and fitting up two 
armories, at an expense of $15,160.99. In Huntington 
hall by the addition of galleries and other improve- 
ments, costing $7,185.18. All the improvements have 
been successfully carried forward by the efficient 
Superintendent of Public Buildings. I can see no 
urgent demand for a large appropriation for this 
department during the present year, except it may be 
for new ward rooms in Wards Three and Five. 



MAYORS ADDRESS. 1 3 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

To feel when we retire to our beds at night that 
there is a corps of men ready to respond to the first 
stroke of the alarm bell, gives us a sense of security, 
and I take great pride in saying that I believe no city 
has a superior body of men. They are prompt, ener- 
getic and fearless. We have been very fortunate in 
regard to fires during the past year. The department 
has been called out forty-one times, at only twenty-four 
of which their services were required. The loss by 
fire was about $48,489.50, upon which the insurance 
was $44,226. God grant that the record may be as 
favorable for years to come. During the year a new 
engine house has been erected on Gorham street, at 
an expense of $10,320.99, exclusive of land, and one of 
the steamers transferred to it from the Middle street 
house. The Chief recommends the formation of a 
salvage corps, and I have no doubt but what it would 
be a valuable addition to the department. He also 
makes another suggestion which the Committee on 
Fire Department should bear in mind, — that a smaller 
appropriation will answer this year than for several 
years past. 

POLICE. 

The regular police force of the city consists of 
twelve day men, including the Deputy Marshal, and 



14 mayor's address. 

thirty-four night men. There is in addition to these 
seventeen supernumerary officers. The expense of this 
department has increased rapidly during the last few 
years, and some of our citizens are of the opinion that 
its cost might be reduced without diminishing its effec- 
tiveness, but as the salaries are already fixed for the 
coming year, the only way to attain this end would 
be to reduce the number of men. But I do not feel 
willing to recommend this measure until I become 
more conversant with the needs of the city in this 
respect. 

THE POOR. 

Under the new city charter you will be called 
upon to elect six Overseers of the Poor, three for one 
year, and three for two years, and I would recommend 
that they be selected with much care, and from those 
of our citizens who are familiar with the workings of 
this department. As the city increases in population 
the demands for charity will keep pace, if not even 
advance, especially under the new settlement law 
which only requires five, instead often years' residence. 
The new charter also provides for a Secretary to the 
Board of Overseers, whose salary shall be fixed by the 
City Council; the appointment of this officer will re- 



MAYORS ADDRESS. 1 5 

licve the City Messenger, who has been greatly taxed 
in the performance oi his manifold duties. The 
present winter will undoubtedly be one of considerable 
suffering, and the expenditures for the poor will form no 
small item in the expenses of the government. There 
were expended for outdoor relief the past year $4778.60, 
an excess of $2364 over 1874. This is to be largely ac- 
counted for by the stagnation in business, "which has 
thrown many families out of employment. This cause 
still remains. The Almshouse and Reform School 
still maintain the position they have so long enjoyed, 
as models of their kind. Unfortunately I am not in 
possession of any statistics from these departments and 
must refer you to the report of the Superintendent of 
the Almshouse for further information. 

WATER WORKS. 

This department is one of the most important of 
the many which we are called upon to provide for, and 
'while the receipts for water have steadily increased, 
still the outlay will exceed the income for many years 
to come, as there will be continued calls for the exten- 
sion of water pipe each year. But these extensions 
are regulated by the Water Board, who have made a 
rule requiring a guarantee of 6 per cent, upon the cost, 



1 6 mayor's address. 

from responsible parties, and this does not seem un- 
reasonable. During the past year a new pumping 
engine has been contracted for at an expense of $34,000. 
The interest upon the water debt for the past year was 
$105,565, which was partly provided for by taxation. 
A similar provision will have to be made the present 
year. 

I am informed by the Superintendent that the num- 
ber of services put in during the year is 526; the 
whole number put in to date being 3754. The amount 
of service pipe laid during the year is 20,098 feet; to 
this add the amount laid previously, and we have a 
total of 154,276 feet, or 29.21 miles. The amount of 
main pipe laid the past year is 24,956 feet, to which 
add the pipe laid previous to 1875, making a total of 
248,747 feet or 47.12 miles. The agregate of charges 
for water are: for 1873, $39,168.64; for 1874, $69,- 
307.39; and for 1875, $82,861.60. This shows an in- 
crease during the past year of 19.55 per cent. Should 
the same ratio of increase be maintained during the 
current year, the amount will be over $99,000. 

The net cost of the introduction of water to Janu- 
ary 1 st, 1876, is $1,876,139.28 as shown by the auditor's 
books. The amount expended the past year was 
$275,660.78; of this $105,565.78 was paid for interest, 
$50,000 to the Locks and Canals under resolution 



MAYOR S ADDRESS. I / 

passed December 31, 1875. At the meeting of the 
City Council held December 31, 1875, a resolution 
was passed which forever sets at rest the long dispute 
between the Locks and Canals and the city, and I bej 
lieve the retiring City Council have done nothing 
which so generally merits the approval of our people 
as this closing act of the year. It may become neces- 
sary during the year to borrow money to meet the de- 
mands for the extension of water pipes which should 
not be paid by direct taxation, until the receipts are 
nearly equal to the current expenses. 

BETTERMENTS. 

The question has often been asked, why do we not 
bring into force the betterment law, and I believe the 
general impression is that we have never taken the 
necessary steps for its enforcemnt. 

The Legislature in 1871, passed a law giving to 
cities authority to assess upon estates benefited " a pro- 
portional share of the expenses of laying out, altera- 
tion, widening, grading, or discontinuance." You, 
therefore, have all the authority necessaiy, and I hope 
you will exercise it, by the passage at an early day, of 
a resolution looking to the enforcement of this law. I 
have never been able to see the justice of assessing 



l8 MAYORS ADDRESS. 

citizens remote from the locality improved, equally 
with those more immediately benefited. 

FIRE DISTRICTS. 

Two efforts have been made by previous City 
Councils to pass an ordinance " for the prevention of 
tires, the preservation of life, and the regulation of the 
construction of buildings in the City of Low T ell," but 
in both cases they failed to pass. This is a question 
that certainly must commend itself to every well- 
wisher of our city, and especially to the members of 
the present City Council, and I trust it may receive 
your early attention, and I have no doubt that an 
ordinance restricting the erection of any wooden build- 
ing upon either side of the principal streets of our city, 
could be passed without any opposition. Once estab- 
lished, the district can be enlarged as the needs of the 
city require. 

LICENSE LAW. 

A law looking either to the regulation or prohibi- 
tion of the sale of intoxicating liquors will always have 
its advocates and opponents, and this question, I pre- 
sume, will continue to agitate the community in the 



MAYOR S ADDRESS. 19 

future as it has in the past. During the present year 
one branch of the government will be called upon 
(unless the City Council shall deem it for the best 
interests of all that a commission be appointed to have 
the whole care of the matter) to license certain per- 
sons to sell intoxicating liquors, under a law passed by 
the Legislature of last year, to regulate the sale of the 
same. The law distinctly defines to whom such 
licenses may be granted, and it says that "the licensee 
shall not keep a public bar, and shall hold a license as 
an innholder or common victualler." No authority 
is given to any licensee to sell spirituous or intoxicat- 
ing liquors on the Lord's da) 7 , except innholders, and 
they to only such guests as have resorted to their 
houses for food or lodging. Thus it will be seen that 
an innholders or common victualler's license should 
first be obtained, before asking for a license to sell 
liquor. During the past year the applications for both 
licenses have been upon the same printed form, and 
the granting of them in many cases carried by the 
same motion. The licensing- of innholders and com- 
mon victuallers is provided for in Chap. 88 of the 
General Statutes, which says there may be as many as 
the " public good requires." 

Previous to the passage of the license law but 
few, if any, victuallers licenses were asked for, but 



20 MAYORS ADDRESS. 

upon its passage there sprung up a great demand, and 
some two hundred have been granted the past year. 
These will remain in force until May ist. At the 
expiration of these licenses it will be for the Board of 
Aldermen (or Commissioners) to determine what 
number the public good requires. During the past 
year there have been 470 applications for licenses 
received; of this number 411 have been granted, but 
only 361 issued, 13 have been surrendered and one for- 
feited, leaving 347 now in force. Of these 123 are 
first class, 10 are second class, 91 are third class, no 
are fourth class, and 9 are fifth class. The whole 
amount received for licenses is $36,275, one-fourth of 
which has been paid to the State, leaving with the 
amount received for recording ($361) $27,567.25 In 
this connection I would say that T believe the appoint- 
ment of License Commissioners would be attended 
with good results. It would relieve the Board of 
Aldermen of much extra labor, and place this matter 
in the hands of gentlemen who, being compensated for 
their labor, would give more time to it. These Com- 
missioners, although appointed by the Mayor, must be 
confirmed by the City Council, so that the selection of 
good men would be of equal interest to all. 



MAYOR S ADDRESS. 2 I 



STATE AID. 



The annual payment of State aid to soldiers' 
families is now decreasing. The widowed mothers in 
many instances have died the past year; some of the 
widows have re-married ; and the children have attained 
the age of fourteen years, all of which circumstances 
cut off further payment. Payments for the year were 
$13,399.68, a decrease of $1,372.98 from the payments 
of 1874. Now due from the State, $24,276.01. 

ASSESSORS. 

When the number of Assessors was fixed at five, 
the territory of the city was not nearly so large as it is 
today. The appraisal of the different kinds of property 
should be done in a manner so that the City shall 
receive a complete account of all property within its 
limits, and furthermore the early commitment of the 
taxes to the City Treasurer is one of very great im- 
portance. To the better accomplishment of this end, 
I would suggest that the Board of Assessors be in- 
creased to six, and that upon their election three be 
elected for one year, and three for two years, and there- 
alter three shall be elected each year to serve for two 



•> 



22 MAYORS ADDRESS. 

years. In this manner we shall avoid what, under our 
present system, is liable to occur at any time, an entire 
new Board of Assessors. 

VACANCIES. 

We are continually reminded of the uncertainty 
of life, but more especially at this time by the death 
of one who was elected to a seat in this council upon 
the same day with ourselves. " Man proposes but 
God disposes." James Howard was a native of Ire- 
land, but had for many years made this city his home. 
He was an upright and honest citizen, and highly 
respected by all who knew him, and I have no doubt 
had his life been spared he would have been a useful 
member of this board. 

David M. Collins also elected a member of the 
Common Council from Ward One, declined to accept 
the office on account of his engagements elsewhere. 
By this decision of Mr. Collins the city will lose a faith- 
ful servant, and you a genial and pleasant associate. 

In consequence of the two vacancies the Mayor 
and Aldermen will be called upon to issue their war- 
rant for an election in Wards One and Three. 



MAYORS ADDRESS. 23 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The balance in the Treasury Jan. 1st, 1875, was $348,342 65 

The whole amount received into the Treasury in 1875 was 1,039,729 59 

Making a total of * 1,388,072 24 

The amount actually paid from the Treasury for all purposes, 

for the year ending December 31st, 1875, was 1,190,439 86 

Leaving a balance of 197,032 38 

There remains the amount of the unpaid draft of December, 

1875, amounting to 39,203 01 

Making the actual balance in the Treasury January 1st, 1876 . . . 158,429 37 

The amount of the city debt, December 31st, 1874, was 2,289,000 00 

Paid during the year $10,500 00 

Borrowed on account of Tyngsborough bridge 10,000 00 

Decrease of debt 500 00 

Leaving the total debt of the city December 31st, 1875 $2,288,500 00 

Of this amouut $538,500 00 belongs to the ordinary debt of the 

city $538,500 00 

And $1,750,000 00 to waterworks 1,750.000 00 

$2,288,500 00 

From the above statement it will be seen that the 
ordinary debt of the city, December 31, 1875, was 
$538,500.00, and the w r ater debt $1,750,000.00, making 
our indebtedness, January 1, 1876, $2,288,500.00. The 
question of municipal indebtedness is one of great im- 
portance. In fact it was considered of so much im- 
portance by the Legislature of last year that they 
passed an " Act to Regulate and Limit Municipal In- 
debtedness." The city of Lowell upon its incorpora- 
tion, forty years ago, assumed the debt of the town, 
amounting to $59,699.67, and from that time to the 
present it has steadily increased, without any adequate 
provision being made for its payment, excepting the 
lund created for the payment of the water debt. 



24 MAYOR S ADDRESS. 

It seems to me that some provision should be 
made for the payment of the ordinary debt of the city, 
other than the usual one, and I would suggest for your 
consideration the wisdom of commencing this year, to 
set aside such sums as may be to the credit of overlays 
of taxes; we shall thus gradually accumulate a fund, 
the creating of which will not be felt by our people. 

The law to which I have referred, sets forth that 
hereafter any debt created by any city or town shall 
not be for a longer period than ten years, (except for 
sewers, which may be for twenty years, and for water 
works, which may be for thirty years,) and that there 
shall annually be raised by taxation, in addition to the 
interest, a sum not less than eight per cent, of the 
principal as a sinking fund. Is it not of as great im- 
portance to provide for the present as the future? There 
will become due this year, $17,500, for the payment ol 
which provision must be made. 

TABLE OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1875. 

APPROPRIATIONS. EXPENDITURES. BALANCES. 

Schools $140,895 14 $126,739 85 $14,155 29 

School Houses 48,045 23 47,312 76 732 47 

Roads and Bridges 165,28153 142,379 60 22,90193 

Reserved Fund 211,18126 181,115 23 30,066 03 

Paupers. . 33,73188 27,87167 5.860 21 

Police 72,494 48 57,560 17 14,934 31 

Fire Department 52,263 64 46,797 09 5,465 55 

Sewers and Drains 84,817 88 72,514 64 12,303 24 

Commons 5,745 19 5,185 32 609 87 



mayor's address. 



2 5 



APPRO] -RIATIONS. 

Printing and Advertising 5,051 69 

Lighting Streets and Public 

Buildings i'5,412 75 

Repairs of Public Buildings. . .. 40,598 54 

City Library 6 ,476 95 

Salaries 23,743 53 

Health Account 3,594 54 

Water Works 299,532 28 

Corporation Tax 31 ,426 42 

City Debt 20,500 00 

Interest on City Debt. 4 8,291 05 

State Tax 38,580 00 

County Tax 24,750 16 

Sinking Fund 25,000 00 

Temporary Loan 61 ,000 00 

Carney Medal Fund. . . 200 00 

National Bank Tax 31 ,245 38 

Abatement of Taxes ] 6,455 44 



EXPENDITURES. 


BALANCES. 


3,712 


54 


1,339 15 


22,061 


63 


3,351 16 


38,886 


27 


1,712 27 


4,564 


78 


1,912 17 


20,775 


00 


2,968 53 


1,425 


08 


2,169 46 


275,660 


78 


23,871 50 
31,426 42 


20,500 


00 




35,165 


80 


13,125 25 


38,580 


00 




24,750 


16 




25,000 


00 




61,000 


00 


200 00 


21,525 


43 


9,719 95 
16,455 44 



CONCLUSION. 



Gentlemen of the City Council : 

I have endeavored briefly to call your attention to 
some of the more important trusts committed to our 
care. It will be impossible for us to please all, but 
let us try and merit the approval of our citizens in 
securing to them as light taxation as shall be com- 
patible with true economy and the best interests of our 
city. In demanding of us strict economy let the 
people themselves set us the example, by not asking 
for improvements that they can do without, for City 
Councils would never dream of doing many things for 



26 mayor's address. 

which they are censured, unless first brought to their 
notice by petition. Before signing any petition to the 
City Council let citizens ask themselves this question, 
is it a necessity? If they will only do this we shall 
be able to show a good account of our stewardship. 

As our soldiers when enrolling themselves under 
the banner of the Union swore to bear true faith and 
allegiance to the United States of America, and to 
serve them honestly and faithfully, so do I, standing 
here upon the threshold of a new year and of new and 
important responsibilities, swear to uphold the good 
name of our city and to "be vigilant in causing its laws 
to be duly enforced, and all violation of duty to be 
prosecuted and punished." 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER: 



CONTAINING 



RULES AND ORDERS 



CITY COUNCIL. 



AND A 



LIST OF THE GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS 



OF THE CITY OF LOWELL, FOR 



1876 




LOWELL, MASS.: 

STONE, HUSE & CO., STEAM BOOK AND JOB PRINTERS, No. 130 CENTRAL STREET 

1876. 



JOINT RULES AND ORDERS OF THE 
CITY COUNCIL. 



1. In the month of January joint standing committees shall 
be appointed, as follows : 

A Committee on Accounts, 

A Committee on Claims, 

A Committee on Commons, 

A Committee on Finance, 

A Committee on the Fire Department, 

A Committee on Lands and Buildings, 

A Committee on Military Affairs, 

A Committee on Printing, 

A Committee on Education, 

A Committee on Streets. 

Each committee shall consist of two Aldermen and three 
members of the Common Council, except the Committee on Streets, 
which shall consist of two Aldermen and five members of the 
Common Council. 

2. Each board shall, in such manner as it may determine, select 
its own members for any joint committee. 

3. In all joint standing committees, except that on Finance, the 
member first named in the Board of Aldermen shall be chairman ; 
of the Committee on Finance, the member first named in the Common 
Council shall be chairman ; and in all joint special committees, the 
member first named in the board where the business originates, shall 
be chairman, and shall call the committee together. 

4. The reports of all committees signed by a majority of the 
members, shall be made to the board in which the business referred 
originated. 



4 MUNICIPAL KEGISTEE. 

5. No committee shall act by separate consultation, and no 
report shall be received unless agreed to in committee actually 
assembled. 

6. It shall be the duty of every joint committee (the Com- 
mittee on Streets excepted), to whom any subject may be specially 
referred, to report thereon within five weeks or ask for further time. 

7. The by-laws of the city shall be termed Ordinances ; the 
enacting clause of which shall be — "Be it Ordained by the City 
Council of the City of Lowell, as follows" : — 

8. An ordinance may originate in either board, and shall be con- 
sidered in three several stages. It shall first be read for information, 
and the question shall then be on ordering it to a second reading) 
but if it has not previously been in the hands of some joint committee 
it shall first be so referred. When reported back, the recommend- 
ations of the committee shall first be acted on. If it shall then 
be ordered to a second reading, it shall next be examined by a 
standing committee of that board, who shall see that it is drawn in 
proper form. 

When returned by such committee, the question shall be on 
ordering it to be enrolled. If so ordered, it shall then be sent to the 
other board, where the same order of proceeding shall be observed. 
When it has been ordered by both branches to be enrolled, it shall 
be enrolled by the Clerk of the Common Council, and shall be by 
him submitted to the proper committee of that board, to ascertain if 
it has been correctly enrolled. If so reported the question shall be 
on passing it to be ordained. If it shall so pass, it shall be signed by 
the President of the Common Council and be sent to the Board of 
Aldermen, where it shall take a like course. If passed to be ordained 
in that board, it shall be signed by the Chairman of the Board of 
Aldermen, and be sent to the Mayor for his approval. 

9. Every joint resolution shall be read in the board in which it 
is introduced, and the question shall be upon ordering it to a second 
reading. If so ordered, the question shall then be upon its passage. 
If passed it shall be sent to the other board, where the order of 
proceeding shall be the same. When passed by both boards, the 
resolution shall be enrolled by the Clerk of the Common Council, 
and when found correctly enrolled as provided in the case of an 
ordinance, it shall be signed by the President of the Common Council 
and the Chairman of the Board of Aldermen, and be sent to the 
Mayor for his approval. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

10. Joint orders shall require but one reading, and when 
adopted shall be signed by the President of the Common Council 
and the Chairman of the Board of Aldermen and be sent to the 
Mayor for his approval. If, however, the Chairman of the Board of 
Aldermen be absent, and the Mayor presiding in the Board of Alder- 
men, the signature of the Chairman of the Board shall not be neces- 
sary upon an order. 

11. An ordinance may be rejected in any stage, but may not 
pass through all its stages in the same day. 

12. Every appropriation of money exceeding fifty dollars, shall 
be by resolution. 

13. Each board shall transmit to the other all papers on which 
any ordinance, joint resolution or order shall be founded ; and all 
papers on their passage between the two boai'ds, shall be under the 
signature of their respective clerks, except ordinances and joint reso- 
lutions in their last stage, which shall be signed by the presiding offi- 
cers. If papers come before either board which have been duly acted 
upon in either board, the presiding officer shall so state without read- 
ins: the endorsements of the clerk unless the latter are called for. 

14. All enrolled ordinances shall be written in a fair and 
compact hand, without interlineations or erasures, and no enrolled 
ordinance or resolution shall be amended. 

15. When either board does not concur with the other in any 
ordinance or resolution sent from the other, notice of such non- 
concurrence shall be given by a written message. 

16. In any case of non-concurrence, each board may appoint a 
Committee of Conference. Such committee shall consist, in each 
case, of three members who support the vote of their own board. 
These two committees may meet jointly or separately, and a majority 
of each shall decide its action. 

17. No committee shall enter into any contract with any of 
its members, or purchase, or authorize the purchase of, any article 
therefrom. 

18. No chairman of any committee shall audit or approve any 
bill or account against the city, for any supplies or services which 
shall not have been ordered or authorized by the committee. 

19. All reports and other papers submitted to the City Council 
shall be written in a fair hand, without endorsement, except in case 



6 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

of the introduction of an order. In such case the member introduc- 
ing an order shall subscribe his name at the bottom of the back of 
the order. All other endorsements upon the back of papers shall be 
made by the clerks, and the clerks of the boards respectively shall, 
on seasonable notice, make copies of any papers to be reported by 
committees, at the request of the respective chairmen thereof. 

20. No business shall be transacted by the City Council in 
Convention, except such as shall have been previously agreed on, 
unless by unanimous consent. 

21. After the annual appropriations shall have been passed, no 
subsequent expenditure shall be authorized for any object, unless 
provision for the same shall be made by a specific transfer from some 
of the appropriations contained in the annual resolution, or by ex- 
pressly creating therefor a city debt ; but no such debt shall be created 
unless the resolution authorizing the same pass by the affirmative 
votes of two-thirds of the whole number of each branch of the City 
Council, said votes to be taken by yeas and nays.* 

22. In ballotings in joint convention, blanks shall not be 
counted. 

23. Either board may propose to the other a time to which both 
will adjourn ; and neither shall adjourn without giving notice to the 
other of its intention. 

24. These rules may be suspended for a specific purpose, or 
amended, whenever twenty -two members of a joint Convention of 
the two branches shall so direct, or whenever a joint order to that 
effect shall be passed by the votes of six members of the Board of 
Aldermen and sixteen members of the Common Council. 

* Chapter 165 of the Acts of 1861, relating to appropriations for the providing of armories for 
the use of military companies, for the celebration of holidays, and for other purposes of a public 
nature, requires a vote of two-thirds of the members of each branch of the City Council present and 
voting by yea and nay vote, and limits the amount in any one year to one-fiftieth part of one per 
cent, of the valuation. 



RULES AND ORDERS OF THE BOARD 
OF ALDERMEN. 



1. At the appointed time the presiding officer shall take the 
chair, and on the appearance of a quorum, proceed to business. 

2. The order of business shall be as follows : 

First — Reading the journal, if it be a regular meeting, of the last 
regular meeting and all subsequent special meetings. 

Second — Petitions and similar papers. 

Third — Appointments, elections, &c. 

Fourth — New business, which unless otherwise ordered will take its 
place at the foot of the Orders of the Day. 

Fifth — Orders of the. Day, consisting of unfinished business of the 
last previous meeting, papers from the Common Council and such 
matters as have been introduced as new business. By a vote of 
six members, any matters in the Orders of the Day may at any 
time be taken up for immediate consideration. 

3. The presiding officer shall decide all points of order, subject 
to appeal. He may read while sitting, but must rise to put a ques- 
tion. He shall allow debate on a question until the vote has been 
declared, but not on the verification of a vote ; and on the demand of 
two members shall take every vote by yeas and nays. 

4. When a question is under debate, the presiding officer shall 
receive no motion but to adjourn, to take up a special assignment, to 
lay on the table, to postpone to a day certain, to commit, to amend 
or to postpone indefinitely. These several motions shall have prece- 
dence in the foregoing order, and debate upon any of them shall be 
confined to the actual motion and shall not go into the merits of the 
main question, except on amendment. 

5. When a vote has passed, except for adjournment or to lay 
on the table, any member voting with the majority may move a re- 



O MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

consideration to be acted upon at the same meeting. Any member 
voting with the minority may move a reconsideration to be acted 
upon at the next meeting, which latter motion shall have priority if 
made before the motion first mentioned shall have been decided. 
No motion shall be twice reconsidered. 

6. No member shall be interrupted while speaking but by a call 
to order, or for the correction of a mistake ; nor shall there be any 
conversation among the members while a paper is being read, or a 
question stated from the chair. 

7. When any member is about to speak in debate he shall rise 
in his place and respectfully address the presiding officer, shall confine 
himself to the question under debate, and avoid personality. 

8. In the month of January, the following committees shall be 
appointed : 

A Committee on Bills in Second Reading, 

A Committee on Enrollment, 

A Committee on Licenses, 

A Committee on Lighting Streets, 

A Committee on Police, 

A Committee on Sewers, 

A Committee on Repairs op Streets, 

A Committee on Weights and Measures. 

The Committees on Licenses, on Police, and on Sewers shall 
consist of three members each ; the other committees shall be com- 
posed of two each. 

9. Every member present shall be held obliged to vote on all 
questions, and not to leave without permission if his presence is 
necessary to make a quorum. 

10. The clerk shall prepare for the use of the board a copy of 
the Orders of the Day, to which shall be added a list of matters laid 
on the table or postponed to a day certain. 

11. When a reference is proposed to more than one committee, 
the question shall first be upon a standing committee of the board, 
then a special committee, then a joint standing committee, and last, 
a joint special committee. 

12. These rules may be amended or suspended whenever two- 
thirds of the members present may so vote, but a motion to amend 
shall not be made and finally acted upon at the same meeting. 



RULES AND ORDERS OF THE 
COMMON COUNCIL. 



1. The President shall take the chair precisely at the hour 
appointed for the meeting ; call the members to order, and within 
ten minutes (or sooner if a quorum be present) he shall cause the 
roll to be called and the names of the absentees recorded. Before 
proceeding to business, he shall cause the minutes of the preceding 
meeting to be read. In the absence of the President, the oldest 
member present shall call the Council to order, and preside until a 
President pro tempore be chosen. 

2. He shall preserve order and decorum ; may speak to points 
of order in preference to other members, rising from his seat for that 
purpose, and shall decide questions of order, subject to an appeal to 
the Council by any member. 

3. He shall rise to address the Council, to state facts, or to put 
a question, but may read sitting. 

4. He shall declare all votes ; but if a vote be doubted, the 
President shall, without further debate, require the members voting 
in the affirmative and negative to rise and stand until they are 
counted, and he shall declare the result. 

5. He may call any member to the chair, but such substitution 
shall not extend beyond an adjournment ; and when out of the chair 
the President may express his opinion on any subject under debate, 
and he shall not resume the chair while the same question is pending. 

6. All questions shall be propounded in the order in which they 
are moved, unless the subsequent motion be previous in its nature ; 
except that in naming sums and fixing times, the largest sum and the 
longest time shall be first put. 

7. After a motion is stated by the President, it shall be disposed 
of by a vote of the Council, unless the mover withdraw it before a 
decision or amendment. 

2 



10 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

8. A motion to adjourn shall always be in order ; that and the 
motion to lay on the table, shall be decided without debate. 

9. The previous question shall be in this form : " Shall the main 
question be now put ? " It shall only be admitted when demanded 
by a majority of the members present ; and, until it is decided, shall 
preclude all amendment and further debate of the main question. 

10. The yeas and nays shall be taken on any question upon the 
request of one-third of the members present. 

11. When two or more members happen to rise at the same 
time, the President shall name the member who shall speak first. 

12. When any member is about to speak in debate, or deliver 
any matter to the Council, he shall rise in his place and respectfully 
address the presiding officer, confining himself to the question under 
debate, and avoiding personality. 

13. No member shall be mentioned in debate by his name, but 
may be described by the place he sits in, or such other designation 
as may be intelligible and respectful. 

14. No member speaking shall be interrupted by another, but 
by a call to order or to correct a mistake. It any member, in speak- 
ing or otherwise, transgress the rules ot the Council, the President 
shall, or any member may, call him to order ; in which case the mem- 
ber so called to order shall immediately sit down, until the question 
of order is decided. If the decision be in favor of the member called 
to order, he shall be at liberty to proceed ; if otherwise, he shall not 
proceed without the leave of the Council. 

15. No member shall speak more than twice to the same ques- 
tion, without obtaining leave of the Council. 

16. Whilst the President or any other member is speaking, none 
shall stand up or pass unnecessarily before the person speaking. 

17. Every motion shall be reduced to writing, if the President 
or any member require it. 

18. When a question is under debate, no motion shall be re- 
ceived but to adjourn, to lay on the table, for the previous question, 
to postpone to a certain day, to commit, to amend, or to postpone 
indefinitely ; which several motions shall have j)recedence i E the 
order in which they are arranged ; and no motion to postpone or 
commit shall be allowed twice in the same day, in the same stage of 
the ordinance or proposition. 

19. A motion for the reconsideration of a vote shall be open 
to debate, but such motion shall not be considered unless made by a 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 11 

member voting with the majority, or unless notice thereof be given 
at the meeting at which the vote passed, in which case the motion 
shall be made at the next meeting after ; and only one motion for 
the reconsideration of any vote shall be permitted. 

20. Every member who shall be in the Council when a question 
is put shall give his vote unless the Council, for special reasons* 
excuse him. 

21. No motion or proposition on a subject different from that 
under consideration shall be admitted under color of an amendment. 

22. All motions and reports may be committed or recommitted 
at the pleasure of the Council. 

23. The division of a question may be called for when the 
sense will admit of it. 

24. When the reading of a paper is called for and objected to, 
it shall be determined by a vote of the Council. 

25. No standing order of the Council shall be suspended, unless 
three-fourths of the members present consent thereto, nor shall any 
rule or order be repealed or amended, without one day's notice being 
given of the motion therefor, nor unless a majority of the whole 
Council concur therein. 

26. All committees, except such as the Council determine to 
select by ballot, shall be nominated by the President. 

27. No member shall be obliged to serve on more than two 
committees at the same time, or be chairman of more than one. 

28. All memorials and other papers addressed to the Council, 
shall be presented to the President, or by a member in his place, who 
shall explain the subject thereof, and they shall be taken up in the 
order in which they were presented, unless the Council shall other- 
wise direct. 

29. Standing committees shall be appointed on the following 

subjects : 

On Bills in Second Reading, 

On Enrollment, 

On Elections and Returns. 

30. No committee shall sit during the sitting of the Council 
without special leave, except the Committee on the Second Reading 
of Bills and Ordinances, and the Committee on Enrollment. 

31. The rules of proceeding in the Council shall be observed 
in the Committee of the Whole, so far as they are applicable, except 
the rule limiting the time of speaking. 



12 MUNICIPAL BEGISTER. 

32. When a committee is nominated by the chair, the person 
first named shall be chairman. In election of committees by ballot 
when a chairman is not specially chosen, the person having the 
highest number of votes shall act as chairman, and in case of an 
equality in votes between two or more members of a committee, the 
members thereof shall choose a chairman. 

33. All ordinances and resolutions shall have two several 
readings before they shall be finally passed by this Council. 

34. All ordinances before being read a second time shall be 
referred to the Committee on the Second Reading of Bills and Ordi- 
nances, and after being reported upon by said committee, shall be 
again read, after which second reading, the question shall be on 
passing the same to be enrolled. 

35. No ordinance or resolution imposing penalties, or author- 
izing the expenditure of money, shall have more than one reading 
the same day. 

36. The seats of the Common Council shall be numbered, and 
determined by lot, and no member shall change his seat but by 
permission of the President. 

37. All committees of the Council shall consist of three mem- 
bers, unless a different number be specially ordered. And no report 
shall be received from any committee, unless agreed to in committee 
actually assembled ; and all reports shall be in writing. 

38. It shall be the duty of every committee of the Council, to 
whom any subject may be specially referred, to report thereon within 
five weeks, or ask for further time. 

39. The clerk shall keep brief minutes of the votes and pro- 
ceedings of the Council, entering thereon all accepted resolutions • 
shall notice reports and memorials, and other papers submitted to the 
board, only by their titles, or a brief description of their purport. 

40. All salary officers shall be chosen by written ballots, and 
blanks shall not be counted. 

41. Members of the Council may attend meetings of any of its 
committees, but shall not vote thereat. 

42. The clerk of the Common Council shall keep the record of 
committees who may require that service ; and on the appointment 
of every Standing Committee a book for records shall be provided by 
its chairman, or by said clerk. The clerk shall have the custody of 
all minutes by him kept ; and the records of the several committees 
shall be open to the inspection of the members of the City Council 



WLASTOE 

LOWELL ,MASS. 






Messenger. 



3Iaym*. 



W 



Reporters . 



I .Prang &C° jjm.'Bo 



CHARLES A. STOTT, 

Mayor. 



1 — Albert A. Haggett, 
2 — Jacob Rogers, 
3 — William H. Wiggin, 
4 — Charles P. Belden, 



5 — George E. Stanley, 
6 — Henry A Hildreth, 
7 — Francis Carll, 
8 — John A. Goodwin. 



Samuel A. McPiietres, City Clerk. 
John H. Nichols, Messenger. 



GOVERNMENT OF THE CITY OF 
LOWELL. 1876. 



MAYOB: 

CHARLES A. STOTT 

119 Nesmith. Street. 



ALDERMEN: 
Chairman— JOHN A. GOODWIN. 

JACOB ROGERS, 99 Pawtucket Street. 

JOHN A. GOODWIN, 75 Chestnut Street. 

ALBERT A. IIAGGETT, 28 Hurd Street, 

CHARLES F. BELDEN, 6 Cabot Block, Cabot Street. 

HENRY A. HILDRETH, 98 Bridge Street. 

GEORGE E. STANLEY,. . . 105 Beacon Street. 

FRANCIS CARLL, 107 Westford Street. 

WILLIAM H. WIGGIN, 44 Willie Street. 



14 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

COMMON COUNCIL: 
President— BENJAMIN C. DEAN. 

Ward One. 

John W. Welch, Tremont House. 

Lewis Stiles, 27 Cabot Street. 

Daniel W. Manning, 133 Adams Street. 

John F. Howard, 11 Lowell Machine Shop. 

Ward Two. 

Leavitt R. J. Varnum, Cor. Bridge and Sixth Streets. 

Charles E. Hallowell, 65 French Street. 

Charles Callahan, 50 River Street. 

William A. Read, 74 First Street. 

Ward Three. 

Charles Cowley, 178 Lawrence Street. 

Charles H. Kimball, 287 Central Street. 

Charles Runels, 235 Thorndike Street. 

William H. Grady, 43 Cedar Street. 

Ward Four. 

Edward Stockman, 572 Middlesex Street. 

Gardner W. King, 85 Westford Street. 

Stephen H. Jones, 5 Gates Street. 

Charles D. Starbird, Cor. Branch and Walker Streets. 

Ward Five. 

Orford R. Blood, Riverside Street, "Pawtucketville." 

John F. Kimball, 108 Pawtucket Street. 

Charles H. Hanson, 39 Rock Street. 

M. Gilbert Perkins, 18 Varney Street. 

Ward Six. 

Edwin Sanborn, 124 High Street. 

Benjamin C. Dean, 7 Tyler Street. 

Charles H. Walker, 40 Tyler Street. 

John J. Pickman, 10 Oak Street. 




BENJAMIN C. DEAN, 

President. 



1 — M. Gilbert Perkins, 

2 — John P. Kimball, 

3 — Charles H. Walker, 

■1 — Charles E. Hallowell, 

5— William A. Read, 

6 — Charles H. Kimball, 



7 — Edwin Sanborn, 

8— 

9 — Charles Runels, 
10 — Edward Stockman, 
11 — Charles Callahan. 
12 — Leavitt R. J. Varnum, 



13 — Charles D. Starbird, 
14— Daniel W. Manning, 
15 — William H. Grady, 
10 — Stephen H. Jones, 
17 — Gardner W. King, 
18 — Orford R. Blood, 

David Chase, Clerk. 

John H. Nichols, Messenger. 



19 — Lewis Stii.es, 
20— Charles H. Hanson, 
21 — John W. Welch, 
22 — John J. Pickman, 
23 — John F. Howard, 
24 — Charles Cowley. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 15 

CITY CLERK: 
Samuel A. McPhetres, School, corner Bowers Street. 

Chosen in Convention of the City Council, on the first Monday in January, City Charter § 17. 
An Assistant City Clerk may be appointed by the Mayor or Aldermen, whenever the City Clerk 
desires it. Ordinance passed June 11, 1873. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL : 
David Chase, 15 Fourth Street. 

Chosen on the first Monday in January. City Charter, § 14. 



MESSENGER TO THE CITY COUNCIL: 
John H. Nichols, Corner Bridge and Jewett Streets. 

Chosen by concurrent vote in January. Ordinance passed December 31, 1875. 



MEETINGS OF THE CITY COUNCIL: 

The Regular Meetings of the City Council are held at the City 
Government Rooms, on the Second and Fourth Tuesday of each 
month, at 7£ o'clock in the evening, as follows : 



January 11th and 25th, 

February 8th and 22d, 

March 14th and 28th, 

April 11th and 25th, 

May. . . w 9th and 23rd, 

June 13th and 27th, 



July 11th and 25th, 

September... •. ...12th and 26th, 

October 10th and 24th, 

November 14th and 28th, 

December 12th and 26th. 



COMMITTEES OF THE CITY 
COUNCIL. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Stanley and Belden ; Messrs. J. F. Kim- 
ball, Stockman, and Runels. 

On Board of Health. — The Mayor, and Alderman Wiggin ; Messrs. 
Hanson, Howard, and Welch. 

On Claims. — Aldermen Hildreth and Wiggin ; Messrs. Read, Pick- 
man, and King. 

On Commons. — Aldermen Carll and Haggett; Messrs. Perkins, 
Howard, and Callahan. 

On Finance. — The Mayor, and Alderman Hildreth ; Messrs. Cowley, 
J. F. Kimball, and Dean. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Haggett and Hildreth ; Messrs. 
Hanson, C. H. Kimball, and Welch. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Rogers and Carll ; Messrs 
Stockman, Stiles, and Sanborn. 

On Military Ape airs. — Aldermen Goodwin and Belden ; Messrs. 
C. H. Kimball, Read, and Jones. 

On Printing. — Aldermen Belden and Rogers; Messrs. Blood, 
Hallo well, and Sanborn. 

On Education. — Aldermen Goodwin and Rogers ; Messrs. Cowley, 
J. F. Kimball, and Walker. 

On Streets. — Aldermen Goodwin and Stanley ; Messrs. Varnum, 
Blood, Perkins, Starbird, and Manning. 



George E. Evans, Clerk to Committees on Streets and Sewers. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 



OF THE BO ABB OF ALBEBMEN. 

On Bills in Second Reading. — Aldermen Wiggin and Haggett. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Goodwin and Belden. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Hildreth, Haggett, and "Wiggin. 

On Lighting Streets — Aldermen Carll and Rogers. 

On Police. — Aldermen Haggett, Carll, and Stanley. 

On Repairs op Streets. — Aldermen Goodwin and Stanley. 

On Sewers. — Aldermen Wiggin, Hildreth, and Belden. 

On Weights and Measures. — Aldermen Stanley and Belden. 



OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 



On Bills in Second Reading. — Messrs. Pickman, Perkins and 
King. 

On Enrollment. — Messrs. Howard, Grady, and Hanson. 

On Elections and Returns. — Messrs. Cowley, Starbird, and Stiles. 



CITY OFFICERS, 1876. 



CITY TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 
John H. McAlvin, Office, City Hall. 

Chosen by the City Council in Convention in January. City Charter, Sect. 17. Deputy Collect- 
ors are selected and appointed by the Treasurer. 



AUDITOR OF ACCOUNTS. 
David Chase, Office, City Hall. 

Chosen by concurrent vote in January or February. Ord. passed Dec. 31, 1875. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 
John C. Woodward, Office, at Civil Engineer's Room, City Hall. 

Chosen by concurrent vote in January or February. Ord. passed Dec. 31, 1875. 



SURVEYORS OF HIGHWAYS. 

Alderman John A. Goodwin ; Councilmen Chaelbs D. Starbied, 
and Daniel W. Manning. 

Chosen by concurrent vote in January or February. Ord. passed Dec. 31, 1875. 



CIVIL ENGINEER FOR THE CITY. 
George E. Evans, Office, City Hall. 

Chosen by concurrent vote in January or February. Ord. passed Dec. 31, 1875. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 
George F. Richardson, Office, 55 Central Street. 

Chosen by concurrent vote in January or February. Ord. passed Dec. 31, 1875. 



20 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

LIBRARIAN OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 
Marshall H. Clough, Office at the Library, Masonic Temple. 

Chosen by concurrent vote in January or February. Ord. passed Dec. 31, 1875. 



DIRECTORS OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 

Charles A. Stott, Mayor ) Ex 

Benjamin C. Dean, President of the Common Council, * Officiis. 



Ward 1 — Charles H. Harvey, 
" 2— Frank E. Rice, 
" 3— Charles F. Tilton, 

The last six are chosen by concurrent vote in January or February. Ord. passed Dec. 31, 1875. 



Ward 4 — Abner A. Jewett, 
" 5 — George Smith, 
" 6 — James C. Abbott. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 
Lorenzo G. Howe, Office, City Hall. 

Chosen by concurrent vote in January or February. Ord. passed Dec. 31, 1875. 

CITY PHYSICIAN. 
Hermon J. Smith, Office, 21 Central Street. 

Chosen by concurrent vote in January or February. Ord. passed Dec. 31, 1875. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF BURIALS. 
Hermon J.- Smith, Office, 21 Central Street. 

Chosen by concurrent vote in January or February. Ord. passed Dec. 31, 1875. 



Francis Goward, 
James Marren, 
William W. Read, 



ASSESSORS OF TAXES. 
Office, City Hall, third story. 



Isaac A. Fletcher, 
Levi B. Stevens, 
David Lane. 



Francis Goward, Chairman. James Marren, Secretary. 



Assignment of Wards. 



Ward 1 — James Marren, 
" 2— William W. Read, 



Ward 4 — Francis Goward, 
" 5 — Levi B. Stevens, 



" 3 — David Lane, 1 " 6 — Isaac A. Fletcher. 

Chosen by concurrent vote in January or February. Ord. passed Dec. 31, 1875. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 21 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Office, City Hall, third story. 

Charles A. Stott, Mayor, Ex officio. 

For 1876- '77. 



For 1876. 

John F. McEvoy, 
Jo si ah Butler, 
Charles Cowley. 



Leavitt R. J. Varnum, 
Frederic Holton, 

Resigned February 22, 
Nathaniel C. Sanborn, 

Elected January 11, 

Sullivan L. Ward, 

Elected February 22. 

Chosen for two years in January, one-half retiring annually. City Charter § 29. 

Sub-Committees. 

On Fuel and Out-door Relief. — The Mayor, Messrs. McEvoy 
and Ward. 

On Agriculture. — Messrs. Varnum, Cowley, and Ward. 

On Neat Cattle and Swine. — Messrs. Sanborn, McEvoy and 
Butler. 

On Care and Repairs of Buildings. — The Mayor, Messrs. Var- 
num and Sanborn. 

On Clothing, Bedding and Furniture. — Messrs. Cowley, Var- 
num and Ward. 

On Provisions and Supplies. — The Mayor, Messrs. Butler and 

Cowley. 
On Reform School. — The Mayor, Messrs. McEvoy and Sanborn. 
Charles A. Stott, Chairman. Frederic Holton, Secretary. 

The regular meetings of the Board of Overseers are held at the 
Almshouse on the last day of each month. 



INSTITUTIONS AT THE CITY FARM. 
These consist of the Almshouse, a Workhouse used for the im- 
prisonment of certain convicts, and "The House for the Employ- 
ment and Reformation of Juvenile Offenders in the City of Lowell." 
The farm embraces about one hundred and twenty -five acres, seventy- 
five of which are in a high state of cultivation. 

Lorenzo Phelps, Superintendent. 
William A. Lang, Chaplain. 

There is also one Male Assistant, and one Female Assistant. 
The Superintendent is appointed by the Overseers of the Poor, 
annually, at the last meeting in December. 



22 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

MEMBEBS OF TEE LOWELL WATEB BOABB. 

Office, 39 Merrimack Street. 

Cyrus H. Latham, President. 

/ 
From the City Council. — Alderman Albert A. Haggett, Council- 
men Benjamin C. Dean and Orpord R. Blood. 

From the Citizens at Large. — Cyrus H. Latham, term expires May, 
1878. Earl A. Thissell, term expires May, 1877. 

Superintendent, Samuel P. Grifpin. 
Clerk, James M. Battles. 

The members of the Lowell Water Board are elected under the 
provisions of an Ordinance passed July 11, 1872 [see also Ordinance 
passed January 11, 1876], entitled "An Ordinance providing for the 
care and management of the Lowell Water Works." The Superin- 
tendent is elected by the City Council and the Clerk is appointed by 
the Board. 



POLICE BEPABTMENT. 

Ord. passed Dec. 31, 1875, and Jan. 11, 1876. Act of 1867, Chap. 279. 

The members of this Department are appointed as Police Officers 
and Watchmen with all the powers of Constables, except the power 
of serving and executing civil process, by the Mayor, subject to con- 
firmation Or rejection by the Board of Aldermen, and hold their 
offices during the pleasure of the Board of Aldermen. Under the 
present organization the Police are divided into Day and Night 
Police. The Day Police are stationed at the Police Office, under 
the direction and command of the City Marshal ; and in addition to 
their other duties, are required to serve criminal precepts. 

City Marshal. 
William H. Clemence, . . Office, west end of Market House Building. 

Chosen by concurrent vote in January or February. Ocd. passed Doc. 31, 1875. 

Beputy Marshal. 
Jacob G. Favor, Office, west end of Market House Building. 

Appointed by the City Marshal, and approved by Mayor and Aldermen. Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



23 



Day Police Officers and Watchmen. 



William H. Clemencb, 
Alfred Day, 
William P. Farrington, 
Jacob G. Favor, 
Harrison H. Fuller, 

Night Police Officers and Watchmen. 
Theophilus C. Blaisdell, Captain of the Night Police 



William M. Lee, 
Benjamin G. Moonet, 
Thomas J. Sanborn, 
James E. Webster, 
Levi H. Witham. 



Allen P. Bickford, 
Andrew Blood, 
Levi Brown, 
John Buchanan, 
John Callahan, 
William L. Clark, 
Charles F. Cooper, 
James Crowley, 
Asa F. Estt, 
Henry Farrington, 
Augustus B. Foss, 
Henry Garrison, 
David H. Goodhue, 
Frank Goodwin, 
Daniel Hayes, 
Charles Howard, 



Thomas Ingalls, 
Patrick Kelley, 
Albert E. Libby, 
Isaac L. Libby, 
John F. McCaffrey, 
Frank McQuade, 
John A. Meloy, 
Frank N. Miles, 
Alonzo Page, 
Mason W. Presby, 
John H. Ring, 
Don "C Robinson, 
Frank T. This sell, 
Hermon N. Tilton, 
John W. Tilton, 
Luke Veo. 



Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen, from time to time. Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 

Supernumerary Police Officers and Watchmen. 



William H. Clifford, 
Daniel Crane, 
Thomas Cunningham, 
Moses T. Flanders, 



James McLaughlin, 
Henry M. Thompson, 
Charles F. Urann, 
Thomas Walsh. 



Special Police Officers and Watchmen not Paid by the City. 
Lists of Special Police Officers are kept by the City Clerk, and 
by the City Marshal. 



Constables. 



William H. Clemence, 
Jacob G. Favor, 
Daniel G. Greenleaf, 
James Hopkins, 
Everett W. French, 
John H. Nichols, 



Dexter Symonds, 
Joshua M. Hardy, 
Andrew C. Wright, 
Joseph H. Guillett, 
Henry Kileski, 
Henry J. McAlvin, 



David Fitzgerald. 

City Charter, Sect. 7. Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 



24 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



J 



William H. Clemence, 
Levi Brown, 
Alfred Day, 
Augustus B. Foss, 
Benjamin G. Mooney, 



Tythingmen. 



Harrison H. Fuller, 
John F. McCaffrey, 
Thomas J. Sanborn, 
Wm. P. Farrington, 
Jacob G. Favor, 



James E. Webster. 

Ten or more chosen by concurrent vote commencing in the Board of Aldermen, in January or 
February. Ord. passed January 11, 1876. 



HEALTH COMMISSIONER. 
William H. Clemence. 

Chosen by concurrent vote, commencing in the Board of Aldermen, in January or February. 
Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 



SURVEYORS OF LUMBER. 



Lorenzo G. Howe, 
James 1ST. Morse, 
Joshua M. Hadley, 
Alfred P. Bateman, 
Atis Osgood, 
John F. Bateman, 
Stephen C. Davis, 



Luther Smith, 
Samuel Newhall, 
Henry L. Tibbetts, 
George A. Roper, 
Aaron Blanchard, 
Edward Stockman, 
Charles O. Davis. 



Four or more chosen by concurrent vote, commencing in the Board of Aldermen, in January 
or February. Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 



Lorenzo Phelps, 



FENCE VIEWERS. 



Edward Fifield. 



Joshua M. Hadley, 



Chosen by concurrent vote commencing in the Board of Aldermen, in January or February 
Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 



FIELD DRIVERS. 



William H. Clemence, 
William M. Lee, 
Peter Buckman, 



Thomas J. Sanborn, 
Wm. P. Farrington, 
Thomas Paul. 



Alfred Day. 



Chosen by concurrent vote commencing in the Board of Aldermen, in January or February. 
Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 25 

POUND KEEPER. 
Sylvester Crosby. 

Chosen by concurrent vote, commencing in the Board of Aldermen, in January or February. 
Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK.— SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY 
SCALES— INSPECTOR OF RALE OR BUNDLE HAY. 

Sydney Davis, office at City Scales, rear- of Market House Building. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February. Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK. 
Francis H. Chandler, At Pawtucket Square. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February. Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 



WEIGHERS OF COAL. 



Sydney Davis, 
Augustus W. Weeks, 
Frank E. Bennett, 



Francis Mollahan, 
Darius Whithed, Jr., 
Bernard Riley. 



Appointed by the Mayor .and Aldermen in January or February. Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND. MEASURES. 
J<ftiN A. Knowles, Jr., Office at Mechanics' Mills. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February. Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 



INSPECTOR OF MILK. 
Charles Stearns, Office, 115 Gorham Street. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February. Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 



SURVEYORS OF PLASTERING, BRICK OR STONE WORK, 
AND PAINTING. 

Samuel Newhall, i George E. Evans, 

Richard W. Baker, Joshua M. Hadley, 

Luther Smith, I • William F. Osgood, 

Atis Osgood. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February. Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 
4 



26 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

MEASURERS OF GRAIN. 
James Berry, George W. Tilton. 

Fees 2)4 mills per bushel for measuring. Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or 
February. Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 



WEIGHERS OF HAY AND OTHER ARTICLES. 

Bernard Riley, at Scales, cor. Western Ave. and Fletcher Street. 
Francis H. Chandler,. at Scales in Pawtucket Square. 

Forty per cent, of their fees are payable to the City, quarterly. Appointed by the Mayor and 
Aldermen in January or February. Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 



MEASURERS OF WOOD AND BARK BROUGHT BY WATER OR 
RAILROAD CARS INTO THE CITY. 

Samuel Newhall, | Luther Smith. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February. Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 



INSPECTORS OF PETROLEUM OILS. 
George Hobson, | George B. Root. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen. Chapter 152 of the Acts of 1869. 



CITY CRIER. 
John Harrigan, Office, 2 Commercial Square. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February. Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 



MEASURERS OF UPPER LEATHER. 



Nathan W. Frye, 
Revilo F. Cook, 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in April. Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876. 



John Q. A. Hubbard, 
William H. White. 



JANITOR OF HUNTINGTON AND JACKSON HALLS. 
Warren Fletcher. 

Appointed by the Mayor. 



MUNICIPAL EEGISTEE. 27 

FIRE DEPARTMENT FOR 1876-'77. 

The members of the Fire Department are appointed by the 
Mayor, subject to the confirmation or rejection of the Aldermen, on 
the first Wednesday in April, annually, and hold their respective 
offices for the term of one year from the first day of May next suc- 
ceeding their appointment, provided, however, that vacancies may 
be filled at any time, and the Chief Engineer and the Assistant 
Engineers may be removed at any time by the Mayor and Aldermen. 

Ord. passed Jan. 11, 1876 ; Chap. 63 of the Acts of 1869. 

Chief Engineer. 
Geoege Hobson, 24 Linden Street. 

Assistant Engineers. 

Samuel W. Tayloe, 172 Merrimack Street. 

Hieam N. Hall, Elliott Street. 

Edwaed S. Hosmer, 12 Livermore Street. 

Hieam N". Hall, Clerk of the Board. 

The Clerk is chosen by the Engineers. 

Steam Fire Engines. 

Hope Steam Fire Engine Company, JVb. 1. 

Gorham Street, , 18 Members. 

Josiah W. White, Foreman. Jewett J. Locke, Engineer. 

Weight, 7,575 pounds. Cost, . Built in 1870, by Union 

Machine Company, of Fitchburg. 

Torrent /Steam Fire Engine Company, JVb. 2. 

Middlesex Street, 13 Members. 

Ruel F. Beitton, Foreman. Geoege Maddocks, Engineer. 

Weight, 7,720 pounds. Cost, $4,000. Built in 1868, by Hunne- 
man & Co., Boston. 

Wamesit /Steam Fire Engine Company, No. 3. 

Middle Street, 13 Members. 

Joseph H. Stackpole, Foreman. | Edwaed L. Beown, Engineer. 

Weight, 7,650 pounds. Cost, $4,250. Built in 1866, by Hunne- 
man & Co., Boston. 



28 MUNICIPAL EEGISTEE. 

Relief Steam Fire Engine, No. 4. 

Warren Street, — — , Engineer. 

Weight, 8,300 pounds. Cost, $3,000. Built in 1861, by Silsby, 
Mynderse & Co., Seneca Falls, N". Y. 

Hose Carriages. 

Ocean Hose Company, No. 1, Warren /Street. 

Samuel G. Coopee, Foreman, 12 Members. 

Mechanics^ Hose Company, No. 2, Cross Street. 
James A. Pieece, Foreman, 12 Members. 

Excelsior Hose Company, No. 3, Central Street. 
James F. Nobton> Foreman, 12 Members. 

Mazeppa Hose Company, No. 4, Fayette Street. 
William King, Foreman, 12 Members. 

Wellman Hose Company, No. 5, Fourth Street. 
James Aemsteong, Foreman, 12 Members. 

Hook and Ladder Carriages. 

Franklin Hook and Ladder Company, Middle Street. 

John P. Peaeson, Foreman, 29 Members. 

Hand Engines. 

The Companies connected with the several Hand Engines were 
abolished May 1, 1868. The following Hand Engine was kept as a 
reserve : 

Rocket, No. 2,. Ayer's City. 

Operator of Fire Alarm Telegraph. 
Geoege B. Whitney, Engine House, Middle Street. 

POLICE COURT. 
Nathan Ceosbt, Standing Justice. 

John Davis, \ SpecialJustices. 

Feedeeic T. Geeenhalge, j r 

Samuel P. Hadlet, Clerk. 

Chosen at the Municipal Election, 1871, and every fifth year thereafter, by the people. Gen. 
Stat, and Chap. 169 of the Acts of 1866. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1876. 



Chaeles A. Stott, Chairman. 
Ephraim B. Patch, Vice Chairman. 
Charles Morrill, Secretary. 



NAMES OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Charles A. Stott, Mayor ' > Ms 

Benjamin C. Dean, President of the Common Council,. . j Officiis. 

Ward 1 — William M. Hoar, Term expires 1877 

James W. B. Shaw, " « 1876 

" 2— Robert L. Read, " " 1877 

George H. Pillsbury, " " 1876 

" 3— John J. Green, « « 1877 

Ephralm B. Patch, " « 1876 

« 4— Henry P. Carter, " « 1877 

Charles Kimball, " " 1876 

" 5— John J. Colton, " " 1877 

William G. Ward, " " 1876 

« 6— Lorenzo S. Fox, " « 1877 

George F. Lawton,. " " 1876 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Accounts. — Messrs. Stott, Patch, Ward, Dean, and Shaw. 

On School-houses. — Messrs. Pillsbury, Patch, Fox, Carter, and Hoar. 

On Teachers. — Messrs. Morrill, Kimball, Lawton, Pillsbury, Colton 

and Green. 
On Reports. — Messrs. Lawton, Colton, Read, Green, and Carter. 
On Books. — Messrs. Kimball, Pillsbury, Lawton, Shaw, Green, and 

Hoar. 
On Salaries. — Messrs. Stott, Dean, Patch, Fox, and Hoar. 
On Penmanshd? and Drawing. — Messrs. Ward, Fox, Dean, Read, 

and Pillsbury. 



30 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

On Music. — Messrs. Shaw, Read, Ward, Lawton, and Kimball. 

On Free Evening Schools. — Messrs. Patch, Ward, Carter, Read, 

and Colton. 
On Suspension op the Schools. — Messrs. Stott, Shaw, and Kimball. 



ASSIGNMENT OF SCHOOLS. 

The Mayor. — High School, and Reform School. 

Mr. Dean.— High School, and Primaries 13, 19, 20, 39, 57. 

Me. Hoar. — Green School, and Primaries 36, 38, 32, 26. 

Mr. Shaw.— High School, and Primaries 8, 11, 12, 23, 29, 43. 

Mr. Read. — Varnum School, and Primaries 46, 47, 48, 49, 55. 

Mr. Pillsbuey. — High School, and Primaries 1, 3, 7, 18, 21, 53. 

Mr. Green. — Edson School, and Primaries 4, 24, 31, 54. 

Me. Patch. — Colburn School, and Primaries 27, 33, 42, 56. 

Mr. Caetee. — Franklin School, and Primaries 5, 6, 15, 30, and In- 
termediate No. 2. 

Mr. Kimball. — High School, and Primaries 17, 28, 34, 50, and Inter- 
mediate No. 1. 

Mr. Colton. — Bartlett School, and Primaries 2, 40, 45, 58, and Inter- 
mediate No. 3. 

Mr. Waed. — High School, Mann School, and Primaries 10,22,41,44. 

Me. Fox. — High School, and Primaries 14, 16, 25, 37. 

Me. Lawton. — Moody School, and Primaries 9, 35, 51, 52. 



BEGULAR MEETINGS OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1876. 

January 31, February 28, March 27, April 24, May 29, June 26, 
July 31, August 28, September 25, October 30, November 27, 
December 25. 



Chaeles Moeeill, Superintendent of Public Schools. 
Office in the City Government Building. 

Office Hours. — From March 1st to November 30th, inclusive, one hour after morning session. 
From December 1st to the last day of February, inclusive, one hour after the afternoon session. 
Wednesday and Saturday afternoons, from 2 to 3 o'clock. 



TRUANT AND POLICE OFFICERS. 
Bickpoed Lang, Jesse Huse. 



WARD OFFICERS, 1876. 



WARD ONE. 

Warden, . . Edward F. Slattery. 

Clerk, John Gillon. 

Inspectors, Andrew Collins, 
William Guiney, 
Charles W. Johnson. 

WARD TWO. 

Warden,. .Edward M. Tucke. 

Clerk, William W. Sargent. 

Inspectors, Julian V. Keyes, 

Timothy G. Tweed, 
Henry F. Whittier. 

WARD THREE. 



Warden, . . John J. Mead. 

Clerk, John E. Maguire. 

Inspectors, Everett W. French. 

James Howard, Jr., 

J. H. McDonough. 

Chosen annually at the Municipal Election held on the second Tuesday in December. 



WARD FOUR. 

Warden, . . Asa C. Russell. 

Clerk, Charles E. Carter. 

Inspectors, David Lane, 

Abner A. Jewett. 

Albert F. Nichols, 

WARD FIVE. 

Warden, . . James M. Coburn. 

Clerk, Clarence H. Johnson. 

Inspectors, A. L. Fecteau, 

Baldwin T. Peabody, 
George S. Brock. 

WARD SIX. 



Warden, . .Leroy S. Kimball. 

Clerk, Henry A. Fielding. 

Inspectors,, Major A. Shaw, 
Oscar N. Kyle, 
. John F. Haskell. 



\<\ 



w/- 



t, 



/** 



POPULATION OF LOWELL. 



Year. 


Population. 


Year. 


Population. 


Year. 


Population. 


Year. 


Population. 


1828 


3,532 


1836 


17,633 


1846 


29,127 


1865 


30,990 


1830 


6,477 


1837 


18,010 


1850 


33,383 


1866 


36,878 


1832 


10,254 


1840 


20,981 


1855 


37,554 


1870 


40,928 


1833 


12,963 


1844 


25,163 


1860 


36,827 


1875 


49,688 



POPULATION AND LEGAL VOTERS BY WARDS. 





1865. 


1875, Old "Wards. 


1875, New Wards. 


WARDS. 


Population. 


Voters. 


Population. 


Voters. 


Population. 


Voters. 


1 


4,181 
4,738 
6,132 
6,238 
6,353 
3,348 


693 
711 
836 
1,174 
1,068 
668 


5,761 
8,645 
9,020 
9,842 
11,540 
4,880 


923 
1,528 
1,529 
2,125 
2,071 

885 


10,363 
8,645 
8,765 
6,919 
6,938 
8,058 


1,617 


2 


1,528 
1,484 
1,554 


3 


d 


5 


1,377 


6 


1,501 






Total 


30,990 


5,150 


49,688 


9,061 


49,688 


9,061 







CATALOGUE 



GOVERNMENT OF THE CITY OF LOWELL, 



CRONOLOGICAL ORDER OF SERVICE, 
"FROM ITS INSTITUTION, 1836, TO 1875. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



35 



1 S 3 6. 

Mayor : 

ELISHA BARTLETT 

Aldermen : 



William Austin, resigned Oct. io, 
Joseph Tapley, elected November, 
Seth Ames, 
Aaron Mansur, 

Samuel A. Coburn, City Clerk 



Benjamin Walker, 
Oliver M. Whipple, 
Alexander Wright. 



Common Council : 



John Clark, President, 
Henry J. Baxter, / 
Jonathan Bowers, • 
George Brownell, 
James Cook, 
David Dana, 
Erastus Douglass, 
Josiah B. French, 
Cyril French, 
Samuel Garland, 
Horatio W. Hastings, 
Horace Howard, 

George Woodward, Clerk, died. 



Stephen Mansur, 
John Mixer, 
Thomas Nesmith, 
David Nourse, 
Thomas Ordway, 
James Russell, 
John A. Savels, 
Sidney Spalding, 
Weld Spalding, 
Jonathan Tyler, 
Tappan Wentworth, 
William Wyman. 
Albert Locke, elected. 



1 S 3 Y . 

Mayor : 

ELISHA BARTLETT, t'36. 

Aldermen : 



Seth Ames, * '36, 
John Aiken, 
Seth Chellis, 



Joseph G. Kittredge, 
Joshua Swan, 
Alexander Wright, * '36. 
Samuel A. Coburn, City Clerk. 



Common Council 



Ward i. 
Joshua Abbott, 
James K. Fellows, 
Jesse Phelps, 
Walter Wright. 

Ward 2. 
William Fiske, 
Thomas Nesmith, '36. 
Josiah Osgood, 
Joseph Tyler. 

Ward 3. 
Joseph M. Dodge, 
Elisha Huntington, President, 
William North, 
Joseph Tapley. 

Albert Locke, Clerk 



Ward 4. 
William Baker, 
Elijah M. Read, 
Charles H. Wilder, 
William W. Wyman. 

Ward 5. 
George Brownell, '36, 
Osgood Dane, 
James Russell, '36. 
Tappan Wentworth, '36. 

Ward 6. 
Andrew Bird, 
Benjamin H. Gage, 
Jona. T. P. Hunt, 
Abram Tilton. 



The figures without other marks indicate membership of the Common Council those years, 
t Mayor that year. * Alderman that year. % President of Common Council that year. 



36 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



1 S 3 S. 

Mayor : 

LUTHER LAWRENCE. 



Benjamin F. French, 
Charles L. Tilden, 
Oliver M. Whipple, * '36, 



AJLclermen : 

George H. Carleton, 
George Brownell, '36, '37, 
Seth Chellis, * '37. 



Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



Ward i. 

Jesse Phelps, '37, 
Walter Wright, '37, 
Eliphalet Brown, 
Perez Fuller. 

Ward 2. 
William Fiske, '37. 
Aaron H. Sherman, 
William Upham, 
Henry J. Baxter, '36. 

Ward 3. 
Thomas Hopkinson, 
Elisha Huntington, J '37, 
Horace Howard, '36, 
John Mixer, '36. 



Common Council : 

Ward 4. 
David Dana, '36, 
Perley Hale, 
Benjamin Walker, * '36, 
William Baker, '37. 

Ward 5. 
Garret J. Bradt, 
Benjamin Wilde, 
Erastus Douglass, *'36, 
Rufus Paul. 

Ward 6. 
Eli Cooper, 
President, Thomas L. Randlett, 

James L. Foot, 
Calvin Goodspeed. 
Albert Locke, Clerk. 



1 S 3 O 



Mayor ; 

LUTHER LAWRENCE. — [Died in April.] 
ELISHA HUNTINGTON, +'37, J '38. 

Aldermen : 



Benjamin F. French, ""38, 
John O. Green, 
Charles L. Tilden, * '38, 



George H. Carleton, * '38, 

John Clark, J '36, 

Oliver M. Whipple, * '36, * '38. 



Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



Ward i. 

Walter Wright, '37, '38, 
Harlin Pillsbury, 
Eliphalet Brown, '38, 
Forrest Eaton. 

Ward 2. 
Jonathan Tyler, '36, 
John Nesmith, 
Henry J. Baxter, '36, '38, 
Jefferson Bancroft. 

Ward 3. 
Thomas Hopkinson, '38, 
Jacob Robbins, 
John G. Locke. 



Common Council : 

Ward 4. 
Benjamin Walker, *'36, '38, 
Samuel Horn, 
Stephen Carleton, 
Stephen Mansur, '36. 

Ward 5. 
Tappan Wentworth, '36, '37, 
Lewis Mclntire, died Feb., '40, 
Benjamin Wilde, '38, 
Garret J. Bradt, '38.' 

Ward 6. 

President, Thomas L. Randlett, '38, 

Joseph S. Holt, 
John L. Fitts, 
Daniel Knapp. 
Albert Locke, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



37 



1 S 4 O. 

Mayor : 

ELISHA HUNTINGTON, j'37, £38, f39- 

.A-lclermen : 



Jonathan Tyler, '36, '39, 
John R. Adams, 
Joseph Bedlow, 



Harlin Pillsbury, '39, 
Seth Ames, * '36, * '37, 
Stephen Mansur, '36, '39. 



Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



Common 

Ward i. 
Forrest Eaton, '39, 
Sylvanus Adams, 
Henry Patch, 
R. M. Hutchinson. 

Ward 2. 
Jefferson Bancroft, '39, 
John Nesmith, '39, 
Joseph G. Kittredge, * '37, 
Josiah Osgood, '37. 

Ward 3. 
Pelham W. Warren, Preside?it, 
Abner W. Buttrick, 
Asa Hall, 
Samuel Burbank. 

Albert Locke, Clerk, died October 



Council : 

Ward 4. 

Ferdinand Rodliff, 

Ethan Burnap, 

Edward F. Watson, 

B. Walker, * , t ) 6, '38, '39, died Sept. 
Ward 5. 

Tappan Wentworth, '36, '37/39, 

Samuel W. Brown, 

John J. Crane, 

George Dane. 

Ward 6. 

Daniel Knapp, '39, 

George L. Fitts, '39, 

Joseph Battles, 

Joshua Converse. 
. John G. Locke, elected October. 



1 8 4 1. 

Mayor : 

ELISHA HUNTINGTON, J'37, +'38, t'39, t'4°- 

AJLcLei'men : 



Seth Chellis, * '37, '38, 
Jefferson Bancroft, '39, '40, 
Cyril French, '36, 



George H. Carleton, * '38, * '39, 
John R. Adams, * '40. 
John Aiken, * '37. 



Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



Ward i . 

Henry Patch, '40, 
George Bragdon, 
John W. Holland, 
Arnold Welch. 

Ward 2. 
William Fiske, '37, '38, 
Erasmus D. Leavitt, 
Jonathan White, 
Nathaniel Wilson. 

Ward 3. 
Samuel Burbank, '40, 
Nathaniel Critchett, 
Royal Southwick, 
Edward Winslow. 



Common Council : 

Ward 4. 

Ethan Burnap, '40, 
William Livingston, 
John Morrison, 
Edward F. Watson, '40. 

Ward 5. 
Tappan Wentworth, '36, '37, '39, 

'40, President, 
Samuel W. Brown, '40, 
John J. Crane, '40, 
Phineas Whiting. 

Ward 6. 
Francis H. Bowers, 
Isaac H. Cooper, 
William Potter, 
John Smith. 
John G. Locke, Clerk. 



38 



MUNICIPAL EBGISTEE. 



1 8 4 2 . 

Mayor : 

NATHANIEL WRIGHT, 

Aldermen : 



Nathaniel Thurston, 
Jefferson Bancroft, '39, '40, '41, 
Cyril French, '36, * '41, 



William Livingston, 
Ithamar A. Beard, 
John W. Graves. 



4i. 



Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



Ward i. 
Jeremiah P. Jewett, 
John Hadley, 
James Townsend, 
Edward J. Payne. 

Ward 2. 
John Nesmith, '39, '40, 
Erasmus D. Leavitt, '41, 
Joseph W. Mansur, President, 
James Hopkins. 

Ward 3. 
Nathaniel Critchett, '41, 
Ira Spalding, 
John Mead, 
Asa W. Willoughby. 



Common Council : 

Ward 4. 
John Morrison, '41, 
William Carlton, 
Oliver March, 
Josiah B. French, '36. 

Ward 5. 
James Patterson, 
Isaac Appleton, 
Josiah Seavey, 
Roswell Douglass. 

Ward 6. 
James Russell, '36, '37, 
Jonathan Kendall, 
Varnum A. Shed, 
Isaac N. Fitts. 
John G. Locke, Clerk. 



1 8 4 3 . 



Mayor : 

NATHANIEL WRIGHT, t'42. 



Aldermen 



Harlin Pillsbury, '39, *'40, res'djune, 

Henry C. Johnson, 

Cyril French, '36, *'4i, *'42, 



S. Spalding, '36, resigned in June. 

Joseph Griffin, 

Charles L. Tilden, * '38, '39. 



Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



Common Council : 



Ward i. 
Daniel Bixby, 
Edward J. Payne, '42, 
Hugh Cummiskey, 
Walter Wright, '37, '38, '39. 

Ward 2. 
Henry J. Baxter, '36, '38, '39, 
John P. Simonds, 
Pliny Lawton, 
Ben Osgood. 

Ward 3. 
John Mead, '42, 
Willard Brown, 
Ira Spalding, '42, 
Benjamin J. Gerrish. 



Ward 4. 
Otis Allen, 
Alfred Gilman, 
Oliver March, '42, President, 
William Carlton, '42. 

Ward 5. 
James Patterson, '42, 
David Bradt, 
John L. Tripp, 
Benjamin F. Holden, 

Ward 6. 
John B. McAlvin, 
Cyrus Battles, 
Sewall G. Mack, 
Charles F. Mitchell. 
John G. Locke, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL EEGISTER. 



39 



1 S 4 4. 

Mayor : 

ELISHA HUNTINGTON, J '37, ¥3%> t'39> t'40, t'41. 

AicleiMnen : 

Henry Smith, Edward F. Watson, '40, '41, 

Selwin Bancroft, Joseph Griffin, * '43, 

0. M. Whipple, * '36, * '38, * '39, I John Wright. 

Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



Common Council : 



War© i. 
Forrest Eaton, '39, '40, 
Gilman N. Nichols, 
Hugh Cummiskey, '43, 
David Healey. 

Ward 2. 
John P. Simonds, '43, 
Ben Osgood, '43, 
Amos Merriam, 
John Clark, J '36, ""39, President. 

Ward 3. 
Charles B. Coburn, 
George Choate, 
Isaac Scripture, 
William C. Gray. 

John G. 



Ward 4. 
Asa Wetherbee, 
Abner W. Buttrick, '40, 
Horatio G. F. Corliss, 
Charles H. Wilder, '37. 

Ward 5. 
John L. Tripp, '43, 
David Bradt, '43, 
John Wright, 
Nathaniel Wright, Jr. 

Ward 6. 
Sewall G. Mack, '43, 
James Russell, '36, '37, '42, 
Jonathan Kendall, '42, 
Gilman Gale. 



Locke, Clerk. 



1 S 4 5 . 

Mayor : 

ELISHA HUNTINGTON, J'37' %'& t'39>t'4°, tV> t'44- 

Aldermen : 

Edward F. Watson, '40, '41, *'44, 



Henry Smith, *'44, 

Selwin Bancroft, *'44, 

0. M. Whipple, *'36, *'38, ""39, ="'44, 



John C. Dalton, 
Daniel Knapp, '39. 



Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



Ward i. 
Gilman N. Nichols, '39, 
Danforth P. Brigham, 
Jonathan Adams, 
Willard C. Welch. 

Ward 2. 
John P. Simonds, '43, '44, 
Daniel Balch, 
William Brown, 
Daniel S. Richardson, President. 

Ward 3. 
Isaac Scripture, '44, 
William C. Gray, '44, 
George Choate, '44, 
Hapgood Wright. 

John G. 



44. 



Common Council s 

Ward 4. 
Abner W. Buttrick, '40, '44, 
Asa Wetherbee, '44, 
Charles H. Wilder, '37, '44, 
Josiah Sawtell. 

Ward 5. 
Nathaniel Wright, Jr. 
Amos Hyde, 
Edward Sherman, 
James Fenno. 

Ward 6. 
Gilman Gale, '44, 
John B. McAlvin, '43, 
Samuel Fay, Jr., 
Lorenzo P. Wright. 

Locke, Clerk. 



40 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



1 S 4 6 . 

Mayor : 

JEFFERSON BANCROFT, '39, '40, *'4i, ^42. 

Aldermen : 



Henry Smith, * '44, * '45, 
Selwin Bancroft, '44, * '45, 
William C. Gray, '44, '45, 
Joseph Butterfield, 

Thomas Ordway, City Clerk 



John C. Dalton, '45, 

D. Knapp, '39, * '45, resigned July, 

Isaac Cooper, '41, elected August. 



Common Council 



Ward i. 

Gilman N. Nichols, '39, '45, 
Danforth P. Brigham, '45, 
Willard C. Welch, '45, 
Thomas S. Hutchinson. 

Ward 2. 
Daniel Balch, '45, 
William Brown, '45, 
Daniel S. Richardson, J '45, President, 
Zadock Rogers. 

Ward 3. 
Hapgood Wright, '45, 
Isaac Farrington, 
Joel Powers, 
Franklin Mead. 



Ward 4. 
Josiah Sawtell, '45, 
Solon Stevens, 
David J. Moody, 
William Fletcher. 

Ward 5. 
Amos Hyde, '45, 
Horatio G. F. Corliss, '44, 
Jonathan Bowers, '36, 
Charles M. Short. 

Ward 6. 
Lorenzo P. Wright, '45, 
John L. Fitts, '39, '40, 
Lewis Packard, 
Columbus J. Hubbard. 



John G. Locke, Clerk. 



1 S 4 T . 
Mayor : 

JEFFERSON BANCROFT, '39, 

Aldermen : 



'40, *'4i, *'42, t'46. 



George Bragdon, 
Joseph Butterfield, * '46, 
Linus Child, 
James Fenno, '45, 



Thomas Ordway, 



Elisha Huntington, J '37, J '38, 

t'39> t'4°> t'4i> t'44. t'45> 
Sewall G. Mack, '43, '44, 
Stephen Mansur, '36, '39, * '40, 
Josiah Sawtell, '45, '46. 
City Clerk. 



Ward i. 

William Conihe, 
James C. Crombie, 
David S. Bachelder, 
Jesse Huse. 

Ward 2. 
Samuel W. Brown, '40, 
Hannibal Powers, 
William Newman, 
Otis L. Allen. 

Ward 3. 

Joel Powers, '46, 
Franklin Mead, '46, 
Isaac Farrington, '46, 
Samuel G. Davis. 



4i 



Common Council : 

Ward 4. 
* Joel Adams, President, 
Horatio Fletcher, 
Solon Stevens, '46, 
Stephen A. Coburn. 

Ward 5. 
Ignatius Tyler, 
Edward C. Johnson, 
Elihu Gates, 
Charles M. Short, '46. 

Ward 6. 
Thomas Wentworth, 
Isaac N. Parker, 
j John R. Southwick, 
J Isaiah Morse. 
John G. Locke, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL EEGISTER. 



41 



1 8 4 8. 

Mayor : 

JEFFERSON BANCROFT, '39, '40, *\i, * '42, f '46, f '47. 

Aldermen : 

Gilman N. Nichols, '39, '45, '46, 
Daniel S. Richardson, J '45, J '46, 
Josiah Sawtell, '45, '46, * '47, 



David Dana, '36, '38, 
Erastus Douglass, '36, '38, 
Jacob Graves, resigned in June, 
William Newman, '47, 



Thomas Ordway, City Clerk 



O. M. Whipple, *'36,*'38,*'39,*'45. 



Ward i. 

William Conihe, '47, 
James C. Crombie, '47, 
Jesse Huse, '47, 
Gerry Wilson. 

Ward 2. 
Otis L. Allen, '47, 
William H. Flagg, 
John Nesmith, '39, '40, 
Hannibal Powers, '47. 

Ward 3. 
Alfred Gilman, '43, 
Thomas Hopkinson,'38, 
Ransom Reed, 
Nathaniel Critchett, '41 



Common Council : 

Ward 4. 

John Avery, 

Otis Allen, '43, 

Abiel Rolfe, 

Horace Howard, '36, '38. 

Ward 5. 
Ignatius Tyler, '47, 
Elihu Gates, '47, 
42, Edward C. Johnson, '47, 

Charles M. Short, '46, '47. 

Ward 6. 
Thomas Wentworth, '47, 
'39, President, Isaac N. Parker, '47, 

Jeremiah M. Currier, 
Horace Parmenter. 



James B. Francis, 
Cyril French, '36, * '41 
James H. B. Ayer, 
Daniel D. Crombie, 



'42. 
John G. Locke, Clerk. 

1 8 4 9 . 

Mayor : 

JOSIAH B. FRENCH, 5 3 6, '42. 

Aldermen : 

Daniel Carter, 
'42, * '43, George Brownell, '36, '37, * '38, 

Artemas L. Brooks, 
Joseph Bedlow, * '40. 
Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



Common 

Ward i . 
Jesse Huse, '47, '48, resigned Feb., 
William A. Richardson, elected Mar., 
Gerry Wilson, '48, 
John W. Smith, 
Alfred S. Saunders. 

Ward 2. 
William H. Flagg, '48, 
Ivers Taylor, 
Isaac S. Morse, resigned, 
Ambrose Lawrence. 

Ward 3. 
Alfred Gilman, '43, '48, 
Elisha Davis, 
James Dinsmoor, 
Andrew C. Wheelock. 



y 



Council : 

Ward 4. 
Nathaniel B. Favor, 
Caleb Crosby, 
Ezekiel Wright, 
Waldo A. Fisher. 

Ward 5. 
Maynard Bragg, 
Joshua Decatur, 
Abram T. Melvin, > 
W. W. Morse. / 

Ward 6. 
William Lamson, Jr., 
Jeremiah M. Currier, '48, 
George S. Wright, 
John Aiken, * '37, * '41, President. 



George A. Butterfield, Clerk. 



6 



42 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



JOSIAH B. 

James H. B. Ajer, * '49, 
Joseph Bedlow, * '40, * '49, 
Daniel D. Crombie, * '49, 
James B. Francis, * '49, 



1 8 5 O . 

Mayor : 

FRENCH, '36, '42, t'49. 
Aldermen. : 

Philip Hardy, 
John Mixer, '36, '38, 
Josiah G. Peabody, 
James Townsend, '42. 



Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



Common Council : 



Ward i. 
John W. Smith, '49, 
Daniel R. Kimball, 
James Watson, 
Jonathan Smothers. 

Ward 2. 
Ivers Taylor, '49, President., 
George Gardner, 
Samuel Lawrence, 2d, 
Samuel J. Varney. 

Ward 3. 
Jonathan Page, 
John Tripp, 
Fordyce Coburn, 
Joshua Merrill. 
Geo. A. Butterfield, Clerk, res'd May. 



Ward 4. 
Abner W. Buttrick, '40, '44, '45, 
Caleb Crosby, '49, 
Benjamin Goddard, 
Nathaniel B. Favor, '49. 

Ward 5. 
George P. Elliot, 
William Fiske, '37, '38, '41, 
George W. Worthen, 
Maynard Bragg, '49. 

Ward 6. 
Albert Mallard, 
Stephen P. Sargent, 
George S. Wright, '49, 
Wm. Lamson, Jr., '49, res'd May. 
Wm. Lamson, Jr., elected May. 



1 8 3 1 



Mayor : 

JAMES H. B. AYER, * '49, * '50. 

Aldermen : 



William Fiske, '37, '38, '41, '50, 
Ambrose Lawrence, '49, 
James Townsend, '42, * '50, 
Philip Hardy, * '50, 

Thomas Ordway, 



William North, '37, 
Abiel Rolfe, '48, 
Lucius A. Cutler, 
Joshua Converse, '40. 
City Clerk. 



Common Council : 



Ward i. 

James Watson, '50, 
Jonathan Smothers, '50, 
Charles B. Coburn, '44, 
Stephen Moar. 

Ward 2. 
Linus Child, *'47, 
George Gardner, '50, President, 
Samuel J. Varney, '50, 
Zachariah B. Caverly. 

Ward 3. 

Fordyce Coburn, '50, 
William Twichell, 
Darius C. Brown, 
Benjamin C. Sargeant. 

• William Lamson, 



Ward 4. 

Benjamin Goddard, '50, 
Richard Dennis, 
Holland Streeter, 
Solomon D. Emerson. 

Ward 5. 
George P. Elliot, '50, 
Edward Fifield, 
John N. Ford, 
Theodore H. Sweetser. 

Ward 6. 
George W. Worthen, '50, 
George W. Jones, died Sept., 
Stephen P. Sargent, '50, 
Albert Mallard, '50. 
Jr., Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL KEGISTEE. 



43 



1 S ^ 2 . 

Mayor : 

ELISHA HUNTINGTON, r374^8,f39,tW'4i>t'44>t'45>*'47- 

Aldermen : 



Joseph Bedlow, * '40, * '49, * '50, 
Joseph M. Bullens, 
Samuel Burbank, '40, '41, 
Joseph B. V. Coburn, 



Wm. Fiske, '37, '38, '41, '50, * '51, 
William North, '37, * '51, 
Alpha Stevens, 
Samuel J. Varney, '50, '51. 



Ward i. 
Rufus Rogers, 
John C. Smith, 
Jeremiah Clark, 
Paul Hill. 

Ward 2. 
Paul Perkins, 
Milton Bonnej, 
William Hovey, 
Zachariah B. Caverly, '51. 

Ward 3. 
Darius C. Brown, '51, 
William Twichell, '51, 
Benjamin C. Sargeant, '51, President, 
'Michael B. Caswell. 



Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 

Common Council : 

Ward 4. 
Holland Streeter, '51, 
Elbridge Livingston, 
Abram French, 
Willard Minot. 



Ward 5. 
Edward Fifield, '51, 
Phineas Whiting, '41, 
George W. Patterson, 
Jonathan Kendall, '42, 

Ward 6. 
Leonard W. Jaquith, 
Seth Pooler, 
Caleb G. Weaver, 
William C. Parker. 



William Lamson, Jr., Clerk. 



1 S S 3 



44; 



Mayor : 

SEWALL G. MACK, '43, '44, * '47. 

Aldermen : 



Elisha Huntington, J '37, J '38, f '39: 

t '40, t '4 1 , t '44> t '45) * '47» t '5 2 > 
Samuel K. Hutchinson, 
Stephen Mansur, '36, '39, * '40, * 47, 
Joseph B. V. Coburn, *'52, 

Thomas Ordway 



Ira Spalding, '42, '43, 
Joseph M. Bullens, * '52, 
Alpha Stevens, * '52, 
Joseph White. 

City Clerk. 



Ward 
Rufus Rogers, '52, 
John C. Smith, '52, 
Marcus A. Thomas, 
James Cook, '36. 

Ward 
Paul Perkins, '52, 
Milton Bonney, '52, 
George G. Bumpus, 
George W. Stanley. 

Ward 
Michael B. Caswell, 
Calvin Philbrick, 
Leonard Brown, 
Henry H. Wilder. 



Common Council : 

Ward 4. 

Abram French, '52, 
Henry C. Howe, 
Joseph S. Grush, 
Samuel K. Pickering. 

Ward 5. 
George W. Patterson, '52, 



Wm. A. Richardson, 
Patrick Conlan, 
Jonathan Bowers. 

Ward 6. 
Caleb G. Weaver, '52, 
William C. Parker, '52, 
George F. Woods, 

C. F. Blanchard. 
* 
William Lamson, Jr., Clerk. 



Presid't, 



44 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



SEWALL G 



1 8 5 4. 

Mayor : 

MACK, '43, 

Aldermen : 



'44> *'47» t'53- 



Elisha Huntington, J'37,t'38,t'39,t'4°> 

t'4 1 ^ t'44, t'45» *'47> t'52, *'53> 
J.'B. V. Coburn, ""52, *'53, res'd Jan., 
Samuel K. Hutchinson, * '53, 
Ira Spalding, '42, '43, *'53, 

William Lamson, Jr., City Clerk 



Joseph White, * '53, 
Horatio Fletcher, '47, 
C. F. Blanchard, '53, 
Charles Sperry. 



Ward i. 
John C. Smith, '52, '53, 
Paul Hill, '52, 
Marcus A. Thomas, '53, 
Thomas Lennon. 



Common Council : 

Ward 4. 
Henry C. Howe, '53, 
Joseph S. Grush, '53, 
Samuel K. Pickering, '53, 
Hubbard Wilson. 



Ward 2. 
George W. Stanley, '53, 
William H. Gage, 
Amos A. Taylor, 
William H. Bradley. 

Ward 3. 
Calvin Philbrick, '53, 
Leonard Brown, '53, declined, 
Darius C. Brown, '51, '52, elected, 
Henry H. Wilder,'53, 
Peter O. C. Frawley. 

Leonard Brown, Clerk 



Ward 5. 
William A. Richardson, '49, % '53, 

President, 
Jonathan Bowers, '53, 
Patrick Conlan, '53, 
John C. Woodward. 

Ward 6. 
George F. Woods, '53, 
Charles S. Eastman, 
Levi H. Straw, 
William P. Webster. 



1 8 3 5 . 



AMBROSE 



Mayor : 

LAWRENCE 

Aldermen : 



'49 ? '5i. 



Wm. Fiske, '37, '38, '41, '50, 
Artemas L. Brooks, * '49, 
Daniel Woodward, 
Lorenzo G. Howe, 



XL 



Andrew T. Nute, 
Abner Frost, 
William S. Johnston, 
Shadrach R. Brackett. 



William Lamson, Jr., City Clerk. 



Ward 
Maynard Bragg, '49, 
Aaron B. Young, 
Augustus B. Roby, 
George L. Harris. 

Ward 
'William G. Morse, 
George K. Paul, 
Mark H. Cook, 
Joseph A. Patten. 

Ward 
Alfred Gilman, '43, '4 
Daniel Hurd, 
Theodore Warren, 
Stephen K. Fieldjng. 



5°: 



Common Council : 

Ward 4. 
Joshua W. Daniels, / 
John Bennett, / 

Alanson Folsom, 
Francis H. Nourse. 

Ward 5. 
John C. Woodward, '54, 
Stephen Bartlett, 
Jonathan Johnson, 
Oliver P. Rand. 

Ward 6. 

I, '49, President, Levi H. Straw, '54, 

William T. Whitten, 
Lucien P. Stacy, 
James M. Moore. 
Leonard Brown, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



45 



1 S 5 6 

Mayor : 



ELISHA HUNTINGTON, j'37, j'38, t'39>t'4o,t'4i,t'44> 
t'45, *'47, t'52, *'53, *'54- 



Edwai-d Tuck, 

Samuel Burbank, '40, '41, *'52, 
Chai-les B. Coburn, '44, 
William P. Webster, '54, 
Hapgood Wright, '45, '46, 



AJ.d.eraien 

Charles H. Wilder, '37, '44, '45, 
O. J. Conant, resigned in March, 
James H. Rand, 

Jonathan Johnson, elected in 
June. 



William Lamson, Jr., City Clerk 



Ward i. 
Enos O. Kingslej, 
Abiel Pevey, 
David M. Collins, 
Marshall E. Thompson 

Ward 2. 
Isaac Hinckley, 
Seth Gage, 
Peter Flanders, Jr., 
Leonard F. Jewell. 

Ward 3. 
David Rogers, 
Benj. C. Sargeant, '51, % 
Henry H. Carroll, 
Peter Powers. 



Common Council : 

Ward 4. 
Francis H. Nourse, '55 
Alden B. Buttrick, 
Holland Streeter, '51, 
James Sands. 

Ward 5. 
Frederick Holton, 
Isaac Place, 
Albert Wheeler, 
Abiel Rolfe, '48, * '51. 

Ward 6. 
Eliphalet Hills, 
Jonathan P. Folsom, 
James K. Fellows, '37, 
John K. Chase. 
James J. Maguire, Clerk. 



52, President, 



52, 



1 8 S V 



Mayor : 

STEPHEN MANSUR, '36, '39, * '40 

Aldermen : 

Andrew T. Nute, * '55, John B. Tuttle, 

John C. Woodward, '54, '55, 
Jonathan Smothers, '50, '51, 
Samuel W. Stickney, 



William Lamson, Jr., City Clerk. 



'47, *'53 



Francis H. Nourse, '55, '56, 
Jonathan Johnson, '55, * '56, 
John Nesmith, '39, '40, '42, '4 



Ward i . 

Abie.1 Pevey, 
Stephen T. Stanley, 
Charles A. Welch, 
George F. Scribner. 

Ward 2. 
William G. Morse, '55, 
William D. Vinall, 
Temple Tebbetts, 
James M. Howe. 

Ward 3. 
Benjamin C. Sargeant, 
David Rogers, '56, 
Henry H. Carroll, '56, 
Nathan Allen. 



50, 



Common Council : 

Ward 4. 

Caleb Crosby, '49, 
John F. Howe, 
John C. Jepson, 
Alanson Nichols. 

Ward 5. 
Frederick Holton, '56, President, 
William H. Wiggin, 
William Goodale, 
Charles Hubbard. 

Ward 6. 
Erastus Boyden, 
Jonathan Kimball, 
Robert J. Garrett, 
William Nichols. 
Henry A. Lord, Clerk. 



51, $'52, X '56, 



46 



MUNICIPAL EEGISTEE. 



1 8 S 8. 

Mayor : 

ELISHA HUNTINGTON, t'37, J'38, t*39»t'4o»t W44. 

t'45» *'47> t'52, *'53, *'54> VS& 

_A_l<lermen : 

Sewall G. Mack,'43,'44, * '47, f '53>t '54> Joseph M. Dodge, '37, 



Samuel W. Stickney, * '57, 
Abiel Pevey, '56, '57, 
Jeremiah P. Jewett, '42, 



Harvey Silver, 
Albert Wheeler, '56, 
Edwin A. Alger. 



John H. McAlvin, City Clerk. 



Common 

Ward i. 
Charles Wilkins, 
John M. Maynard, 
John E. Webb, 
William Barnard. 

Ward 2. 
Edward Tuck, * '56, 
William P. Webster, '54, * '56, 
Andrew Blood, 
William F. Salmon. 

Ward 3. 
Benjamin C. Sargeant, '51, J '52, J '56, 

'57, President, 
Hanover Dickey, 
Joseph A. Brabrook, 
Benjamin S. Butterworth. 



Council : 

Ward 4. 
Enoch P. Young, 
Zephaniah Goward, 
Jesse Blake, 
John F. Howe, '57. 

Ward 5. 
Willard Dudley, 
Samuel T. Manahan, 
Isaac Page, 
John Avery, 2d. 

Ward 6. 
William Nichols, '57, 
Alpha B. Farr, resigned in Jan., 
Leonard Brown, '53, '54,elec'd Feb. 
Erastus Boyden, '57, 
James H. Rand, *'56,resign 7 d May, 
Eben'r Burgess, elected in June. 
George Gardner, Clerk. 



'52, 



Lorenzo G. Howe, * '55, 

Samuel J. Varney, '50, '51 

Paul Hill, '52, '54, 

Ambrose Lawrence, '49, '51, t'55? re 

signed in April, 
Darius C. Brown, '51, '52, 

John H 



1 8 3 9 . 

Mayor : 

JAMES COOK, '36, '53. 

Aldermen : 

John F. Howe, '57, '58, 
JoshuaConverse,'40,*'5i,re'd Apr. 
J. P. Folsom,'56, resign'd in April, 
Edward Tuck,*'56,'58,elecf d May, 
Sam'l T. Manahan, '58, elec'd May, 
Jonathan Ladd, elected in May. 
McAlvin, City Clerk. 



Ward i. 

John E. Webb, '58, 
Charles Wilkins, '58, 
William Barnard, '58, 
William D. Blanchard. 
Ward 2. 
W. P. Webster,'54,*'56,'58,.ZVes2Vfe»/, 
William F. Salmon, '58, 
James M. Howe, '57, 
David Nichols. 

Ward 3. 
George Hobson, 
Asahel D. Puffer, 
John Willoughby, 
Benjamin S. Butterworth, '58. 



Common Council : 



Ward 4. ' 
Caleb Crosby, '49, '50, '57, 
Jesse Blake, '58, 
George W. Partridge, 
George W. Young. 

Ward 5. 
Horatio G. F. Corliss, '44, '46, 
Luther B. Morse, J 

Josiah G. Peabody, * '50, 
William Goodale, '57. 

Ward 6. 
Charles A. Stott, 
Levi Sprague, 
Ebenezer Burgess, '58, 
Leonard Brown, '53, '54, '58. 



George Gardner, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



47 



1 8 6 O. 

Mayor : 

BENJAMIN C. SARGEANT, '51, j'52, J '56, '57, J '58 

Aldermen : 

Edward F. Watson, '40, '41, * '44, * '45, Henry H. Wilder, '53, '54, 

Lorenzo G. Howe, * '55, * '59, 
James Watson, '50, '51, 
^/ William G. Morse, '55, '57, 



Abner Frost, * '55, 

Samuel T. Manahan, '58, * '59, 

William S. Gardner. 



John H. McAlvin, City Clerk. 



Common 

Ward i. 
Benjamin S. Ireson, 
Enoch Quimby, 
John P. Slocum, 
Amos H. Foster. 

Ward 2. 
Henry P. Clough, 
Alfred S. Saunders, '49, 
Wm. F. Salmon, '58, '59, President, 
Joseph L. Sargent. 

Ward 3. 
George Hobson, '59, 
Josiah B. Fielding, 
Henry P. Perkins, 
Hocum Hosford. 



Council : 

Ward 4. 
George W. Partridge, '59, 
George W. Young, '59, 
Morrill M. Bohonan, 
Caleb Crosby, '49, '50, '57, '59. 

Ward 5. 
Josiah G. Peabody, * '50, '59, 
Sullivan L. Ward, 
George F. Morey, 
William H. Lamson. 

Ward 6. 
William Nichols, '57, '58, 
Samuel T. Lancaster, 
Charles A. Stott, '59, 
Foster Nowell. 



George Gardner, Clerk. 



1 S © 1 . 



Mayor : 

BENJAMIN C. SARGEANT, '51, J '52, +'56, '57, J '58, f'6o. 

Aldermen. : 



Samuel T. Manahan, '58, * '59, * 
Jonathan P. Folsom, '56, * '59, 
James Watson, '50, '51, *'6o, 
William G. Morse, '55, '57, * '60, 
Hocum Hosford, '60, 



'60, 



Aldis L. Waite, 

David Whitney, declined accept- 
ance, 
Sager Ashworth, elected in May, 
William S. Gardner, * '60. 



Ward i. 

Frank E. Jewett, 

M. Gilbert Perkins, 

Jacob Baron, 

William D. Blanchard, '59. 

Ward 2. 
Alfred S. Saunders, '49, '60, 
Joseph L. Sargent, '60, 
Henry P. Clough, '60, 
Henry S. Orange. 

Ward 3. 
William L. North, President, 
George W. Norris, 
Henry P. Perkins, '60, 
James G. Morrison. 

George 



John H. McAlvin, City Clerk. 
Common Council : 



Ward 4. 

Joseph Cater, 
Joseph B. Keyes, 
Morrill M. Bohonan, '60, 
Abel M. Ayer. 

Ward 5. 
Sullivan L. Ward, '60, 
Samuel Beck, 
William H. Parker, 
George F. Morey, '60. 

Ward 6. 
Samuel T. Lancaster, '60, 
Foster Nowell, '60, 
Elon A. Sanborn, 
George E. Dana. 
Gardner, Clerk. 



48 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



i s e 2 . 

Mayor : 

HOCUM HOSFORD, '6o, *'6i. 

Aldermen : 



Mertoun C. Bryant, 
Edwin A. Alger, * '58, 
James B. Francis, * '49, 
William A. Burke, 



: '5o, 



Isaac F. Scripture, 
Aldis L. Waite, *'6i, 
Albert Wheeler, '56, * '58, 
Jona. P. Folsom, '56, *'59, *'6i. 



John H. McAlvin, City Clerk. 



Ward i. 
Amos D. Wright, 
Frank E. Jewett, '61, 
Horatio G. Burgess, 
Charles F. Hard. 

Ward 2. 
Benedict O.. Carpenter, 
William T. McNeill, 
Lorenzo G. Howe, * '55, 
Henry S. Orange, '61. 

Ward 3. 
George W. Norris, '61, 
Edmund D. Fletcher, 
Everett W. French, 
John Quinn. 



Common Council : 

Ward 4. 
Joseph B. Keyes, '61, 
George Runels, 
John Pettingell, 
Hubbard Willson, '54. 

Ward 5. 
Rollin C. Downs, 
Albert Mallard, '50, '51, 
Edward Fifield, '51, '52, 
Cleveland J. Cheney. 

Ward 6. 
Geo.. F. Richardson, President, 
Albion J. Dudley, 
Elon A. Sanborn, '61, 
Frederick Frye. 
George Gardner, Clerk. 



* '58, * '60, 



1 s e 3 . 

Mayor : 

HOCUM HOSFORD, '60, *'6i, t'62. 

.AJLcLermen : 



James B. Francis, * '49, * '50, * '62, 
Edwin A. Alger, * '58, * '62, 
Abiel Pevey, '56, '57, * '58, 
William A. Burke, * '62, 

John H. McAlvin, 



Isaac F. Scripture, * '62, 
Otis Allen, '43, '48, 
Albert Wheeler, '56, * '58, * '62, 
William Nichols, '57, '58, '60. 
City Clerk. 



Ward i. 
Charles F. Hard, '62, 
Amos D. Wright, '62, 
John Cosgrove, 
William A. Wright. 

Ward 2. 
George F. Sawtell, 
Henry S. Orange, '61, '62, 
Hugh McEvoy, 
Nathaniel Stearns. 

Ward 3. 
Everett W. French, '62, 
Fordyce Coburn, '50, '51, 
Edmund D. Fletcher, '62, 
John Quinn, '62. 



Common Council : 

Ward 4. 

Atwell F. Wright, 
Josiah Gates, 
William Stafford, 
John McCann. 

Ward 5. 
James C. Ayer, 
Charles W. Saunders, 
Cyrus H. Latham, 
John E. Downs. 

Ward 6. 
Geo. F. Richardson, J '62, Pres., 
Albion J. Dudley, '62, 
Benedict O. Carpenter, '62, 
Frederick Frye, '62. 



George Gardner, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



49 



1 8 6 4 



Mayor : 

HOCUM HOSFORD, ? 6o, *'6i, t'62, f/63. 

Ald.eraa.en : 



William S. Southworth, 

James B. Francis, * '49, * '50, * '62, * '63, 

Dana B. Gove, 

William T. McNeill, '62, 



George W. Norris, '61, '62, 
George Runels, '62, 
Cyrus H. Latham, '63, 
George F. Richardson, J '62, J '63. 



John H. McAlvin, City Clerk. 



Common Council : 



Ward i. 
Alden B. Watson, 
Lewis L. Perrin, 
Frederick S. Tukey, 
John Cosgrove, '63. 

Ward 2. 
George Ripley, President, 
Andrew F. Jewett, 
Artemas S. Young, 
Hoyt W. Hilton. 

Ward 3. 
Samuel N. Wood, 
Charles W. Dodge, 
Joseph S. Pollard, 
James G. Morrison, '61. 



George 



Ward 4. 

Atwell F. Wright, '63, 
Daniel Churchill, 
William W. Sherman, 
Francis Jewett. 

Ward 5. 
John E. Downs, '63, 
Thos. G. Gerrish, res'd June 14, 
Charles Hubbard, '57, 
Cleveland J. Cheney, '62. 

Ward 6. 
Levi Sprague, '59, 
Tobias L. P. Lamson, 
Addison Putnam, 
Albion J. Dudley, '62, '63. 
Gardner, Clerk. 



JOSIAH G 



1 8 6 5 . 

Mayor : 

PEABODY, *'5o, '59, '60. 

Aldermen : 



Ew'd F.Watson, '40, '41, *'44, *'45, *'6o, 
George W. Norris, '61, '62, * '64, 
Dana B. Gove, * '64, 
William T. McNeill, '62, * '64, 



Henry H. Wilder, '53, '54, * '60, 
Josiah Gates, '63, 
Cyrus H. Latham, '63, * '64, 
William Brown, '45, '46. 



John H. McAlvin, City Clerk. 



Common Council : 



Ward i. 
Alden B. Watson, '64, 
Lewis L. Perrin, '64, 
George N. Osgood, 
John R. Southwick, '47. 

Ward 2. 
George Ripley, % '64, President, 
Andrew F. Jewett, '64, 
Julian V. Keyes, 
Chester W. Rugg. 

Ward 3. 
Joseph S. Pollard, '64, 
Charles W. Dodge, '64, 
EWward C. Rice, 
Frederick T. North. 

George 



Ward 4. 

Francis Jewett, '64, 
Benjamin Walker, 
Benjamin L. Googins, 
John Pearson. 

Ward 5. 
Charles Hubbard, '57, '64, 
James Kent, 
Simeon D. Osterhoudt, 
James Foster. 

Ward 6. 
Tobias L. P. Lamson, '64, 
Luke C. Dodge, 
Gustavus A. Gerry, 
James M. Moore, '5$. 
Gardner, Clerk. 



50 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



1 8 6 6. 

Mayor : 

JOSIAH G. PEABODY, 

Aldermen : 



'50, '59, '60, t'65. 



Samuel A. Brown, 
Albert B. Plimpton, 
John R. Southwick, '47, '65, 
Joseph L. Sargent, '60, '61, 



Charles W. Dodge, '64, '65, 
Josiah Gates, '63, * '65, 
Henry M. Hooke, 
Albion J. Dudley, '62, '63, '64. 



John H. McAlvin, City Clerk. 



Ward i. 
William A. Hodge, 
William A. Wright, '63, 
Jacob Baron, '61, 
Rollin C. Downs, '62. 

Ward 2. 
Andrew F. Jewett, '64, '65, 
George H. Whitmore, 
Julian V. Keyes, '6$, 
Chester W. Rugg, 6$. 

Ward 3. 
Edward C. Rice, '65, 
Frederick T. North, '65, 
James N. Pinkham, 
Oliver W. Smith. 



Common Council : 

Ward 4. 
Benjamin L. Googins, '65, 
Alfred Scott, 
Thomas F. Burgess, 
Benjamin Walker, '65. 

Ward 5. 
Robert H. Butcher, 
John T. Lee, 
George L. Huntoon, 
Jonathan Johnson, '55, * '56, * '57. 

Ward 6. 
Gustavus A. Gerry, '65, President, 
Luke C. Dodge, '65, 
Charles A. Kimball, 
Alfred H. Chase. 



George Gardner, Clerk. 



1 8 6 V . 

Mayor : 

GEORGE F. RICHARDSON, j'62, ^63, *'6^. 

Aldermen 

Charles B. Coburn, '44, '51, *'$6, 
Hocum Hosford, 6o,*'6i,t'62,t'63,t'64, 
John R. Southwick, '47, '65, *'66, 
Joseph L. Sargent, 60, '61, *'66, 
Edward C. Rice, '65, '66 : 



John H. McAlvin, City Clerk 



Common Council 1 



Abner W. Buttrick, '40, '44, '45, '50; 

died June 29, '67. 
Wm. E. Livingston, el. Sept. 9/67 . 
Wm. H. Parker, '61, 
Albion J. Dudley, '62, 63, 64, *'66. 



Ward i. 
John Shepard, 
Calvin Sawtell, 
Foster Wilson, 
M. Gilbert Perkins, '61. 

Ward 2. 
Gustavus A. Gerry/65, % '^President 
Ruel J. Walker, 
William Dobbins, 
Silas Tyler, Jr. 

Ward 3. 
Jona. P. Folsom, '56, ^'59, *'6i, *'62, 
Frederick T. North, '65, '66, 
Samuel D. Prescott, 
Nathan M. Wright. 



Ward 4. 
John B. Hunt, 
John Q^ A. Hubbard, 
Alfred Scott, '66, 
Thomas F. Burgess*, '66. 

Ward 5. 
George L. Huntoon, '66, 
George S. Cheney, 
James Foster, '65, 
John T. Lee, '66. 

Ward 6. 
Alfred H. Chase, '66, 
James Lawton, * 

John N. Peirce, Jr., 
Foster Nowell, '60, '61, resigned 

May 14, '67. 
Wm. Kittredge, elected Sept. 9/67. 
George Gardner, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



51 



1 S 6 8 . 

Mayor : 

GEORGE F. RICHARDSON, J '62, t'63, #'64, f6>j. 

Aldermen : 



Charles B. Coburn, '44, '51, ="='56, *'67 
Francis Jewett, '64, '65, 
John M. Pevey, resigned in July. 
Charles L. Hildreth, elected in Sept 
Silas Tyler, Jr., '67. 



Edward C. Rice, '65, '66, * '67, 
William E.Livingston, *'67, 
Frederic Frye, '62, '63, 
Albion J. Dudley, '62, '63, '64, *'66, 
*67- 



John H. McAlvin, City Clerk. 



Common Council: 



Ward i. 
Calvin Sawtell, '67, 
John Shepard, '67, 
John F. Merrill, 
Frederic T. Greenhalge. 

Ward 2. 
Francis D. Munn, 
Joseph A. Patten, '55, 
Ruel J. Walker, '67, 
Henry S. Orange, '61, '62, '63. 

Ward 3. 
George W. Badger, 
Samuel D. Prescott, '67, 
William Walker, 
Albert A. Haggett. 

George 



Ward 4. 
William H. Anderson, 
John Q^ A. Hubbard, '67, 
Charles T. Crane, 
John B. Hunt, '67. 

Ward 5. 
Edwin Lamson, 
George S. Cheney, '67. 
William Kelley, 
Ethan N. Spencer. 

Ward 6. 
John N. Peirce, Jr., 
James Lawton, '67, 
Francis Brown, 
Alfred H. Chase,'66,'67, President. 

Gardner, Clerk. 



'67, 



18 6 9. 



Mayor : 

JONATHAN P. FOLSOM, '56, *'$ 9 , *'6i, *'6z, '6^. 

A_ld.ermen : 



Francis Jewett, '64, '65, * '68, 
Henry H. Wilder, '53, '54, * '60, *'6$, 
Charles L. Hildreth, * '68, 
Cyrus H. Latham, '63, *'64, *'65- 

John H. McAlvin, City Clerk 



Hapgood Wright, '45, '46, *'56, 
John Q^ A. Hubbard, '67, '68, 
George S. Cheney, '67, '68, 
Charles A. Stott, '59, '60. 
Resigned March 15, 1869. 



Samuel A. McPhetres, City Clerk. Elected March 15, 1869. 



Ward i. 
Frederic T. Greenhalge, 
John H. Durgin, Jr., 
Patrick Keyes, 
Benjamin Patch. 

Ward 2. 
Joseph A. Patten, '55, '68, 
Phineas Jones, 
Francis D. Munn, '68, 
Amos Sanborn. 

Ward 3. 
George W. Badger, '68, 
Albert A. Haggett, '68, 
William Walker, '68, 
George E. Pinkham. 



68, 



Common Council : 

Ward 4. 
William H. Anderson, '68, Pres., 
Simeon G. Lj'ford, 
Henry P. Carter, 
Epaphras A. Hill. 

Ward 5. 
William Kelley, 68, 
Willard A. Brown, 
William O. Fiske, 
Edwin Lamson, '68. 

Ward 6. 
Francis Brown, '68, 
Alpha B. Fan-, '58, 
Lucian P. Stacy, '55, 
William Kittredge, '67. 
George Gardner, Clerk. 



52 



MUNICIPAL REGISTEK. 



1 8 V O. 

Mayor : 

JONATHAN P. FOLSOM, '56, **&, *'6i, *'6a, '67, t'69. 

Aldermen : 



Edward F. Sherman, 

Frank F. Battles, 

Charles L. Hildreth, * '68, * '69. 

Amos B. French, 



Hapgood Wright, '45, '46, * '56, * '69. 
John Q^A. Hubbard, '67, '68, *'69- 
Addison Putnam, '64. 
Charles A. Stott, '59, '60, * '69. 



Samuel A. McPhetres, City Clerk. 



Ward i. 
John H. Durgin, Jr., '69, 
Benjamin Patch, '69. 
Patrick Keyes, '69. 
Samuel G. Ladd. 



Common Council: 

Ward 4. 
Epaphras A. Hill, '69. 
Henry P. Carter, '69. 
Simeon G. Lyford, '69. 
Michael Corbett. 



Ward 2. 
Phineas Jones, '69. 
John L. Moulton, 
Patrick Cummiskey, 
David G. Skillings, 

Ward 3. 
Albert A. Haggett, '68, '69, President. 
Henry P. Perkins, '60, '61. 
Hocum Hosford, '60, *'6i, f '62, f '63, 

f '64, * '67, declined. 
Matthew Donovan, 
John L. Meadowcroft, elected Jan. 24. 



Ward 5. 
William O. Fiske, '69. 
Willard A. Brown, '69. 
James D. Hartwell, 
Jeremiah Crowley. 

Ward 6. 
Alpha B. Farr, '58, '69. 
William Kittredge, '67, '69. 
Lucian P. Stacy, '55, '69. 
John Stott. 



George Gardner, Clerk. 



1871. 



Mayor : 

EDWARD F. SHERMAN, *'7o. 

Aldermen : 

Albert A. Haggett, '68, '69, J'70, 



Frank F. Battles, * '70, 
William F. Salmon, '58, '59, % '60, 
John W. Smith, '49, '50, 
Amos B. French, * '70, 

Samuel A 



Henry C. Howe, '53, '54, 
Frederick Ayer, 
Addison Putnam, '64, * '70. 
McPhetres, City Clerk. 



Common Council: 



Ward i. 
John H. Durgin, Jr., '69, '70, 
Samuel G. Ladd, '70, 
Francis N. J. Haviland, 
Joel Knapp. 

Ward 2. 
William Dobbins, '67, 
John L. Moulton, '70, 
Patrick Cummiskey, '70, 
Amos A. Blanchard. 

Ward 3. 
Henry P. Perkins, '60, '61, '70, Pres. 
John L. Meadowcroft, '70, 
Horace Ela, 
Julius C. Jockow. 



Ward 4. 
Benj. Walker, '65, '66, 
Michael Corbett, '70, 
Francis H. Chandler, 
Charles T. Goddard. 

Ward 5. 
Jeremiah Crowley, '70, 
Crawford Burnham, 
Henry C. Church, 
Patrick Lynch. 

Ward 6. 
Leonard Brown, '53, '54, '58, '59, 
John Stott, '70, 
Abel T. Atherton, 
Nathaniel C. Sanborn. 



George Gardner, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



53 



1 8 V 2. 

Mayor : 

JOSIAH G. PEABODY, *'5o, '59, '60, t'65, f'66. 

A-lcLermen : 



Henry C. Howe, '53, '54, *'7i, 
Alexander G. Cumnock, 
Benjamin Patch, '69, '70, 
Gustavus A. Gerry, '65, J '66, J '67, 



Frederick T. North, '65, '66, '67, 
Benj. Walker, '65, '66, '71, 
William Kelley, '68, '69, 
Alpha B. Farr, '58, '69, '70. 



Samuel A. McPhetres, City Clerk. 



Common Council! 



Ward i. 



/John E. Webb, '58, '59, 
/ Alonzo F. Caswell, 



Southwell Farrington, 
True P. Jordan. 

Ward 2. 
Leonard Brown, '53, '54, '58, '59, '71, 
Amos A. Blanchard, '71, 
Joseph S. Brown, 
Earl A. Thissell. 

Ward 3. 
Henry P. Perkins, '60, '61, '70, J '71, 
Horace Ela, '71, [Pres. 

Julius C. Jockow, '71, 
Charles F. Tilton. 



Ward 4. 
Nathaniel P. Favor, 
Nathan W. Frye, 
Henry A. Lord, 
Alonzo L. Russell. 

Ward 5. 
Crawford Burnham, '71, 
Charles F. Belden, 
Luther J. Eames, 
William Shepard. 

Ward 6. 
Abel T. Atherton, '71, 
Nathaniel C. Sanborn, '71, 
Samuel M. Chase, 
Julian Talbot. 



George Gardner, Clerh. 



1873. 
Mayor : 

FRANCIS JEWETT, '64, '65, *'68, *'6g. 

Aldermen : 



Jonathan P. Folsom, '56, *'S9, *'6i, 

* '62, '67, f '69, t'7o, 
George Runels, '62, * '64, 
Edward Tuck, *'56, '58, *'59, declin'd, 
Isaac Farrington, '46, '47, declined, 
William Dobbins, '67/71, elec. Jan. 14, 

Samuel A. McPhetres, City Clerk 



Charles A. F. Swan, elected Jan. 14, 
Jacob H. Sawyer, 
Jeremiah Crowley, '70, '71, 
Alpha B. Farr, '58, '69, '70, * '72, 
George Stevens. 



Ward i. 

John E. Webb, '58, '59, '72, 
Alonzo F. Caswell, '72, 
Frank Brady, 
Stephen J. Smiley, 

Ward 2. 
Joseph S. Brown, '72, 
Earl A. Thissell, '72, 
Daniel Stickney, 
Edward P. Woods. 



Common Conncil: 



[Pres. 



Ward 3. 
Albert A. Haggett, '68, '69, J '70s * '71, 
Charles F. Tilton, '72, resig'd Mar. 1, 
William Bass, 
James Owens, 
James A. Loughlin, elected April 8. 

George Gardner, Clerk. 



Ward 4. 
Atwell F. Wright, '63, '64, 
Nathaniel P. Favor, '72, 
Nathan W. Frye, '72, 
Henry A. Lord, '72. 

Ward 5. 
Robert H. Butcher, '66, 
Charles F. Belden, '72, 
Jared P. Maxfield, 
George Smith. 

Ward 6. 
Nathaniel C. Sanborn, '71, '72, 
Samuel M. Chase, '72, 
George W. S. Hurd, 
Artemas S. Tyler. 



54 



MUNICIPAL EEGISTEE. 



1 8 7" 4. 

Mayor : 

FRANCIS JEWETT, '64, '65, 

Aldermen : 



S,*'6 9 ,t'73- 



Jeremiah Crowley, '70, '71, * '73, 
Benj. Walker, '65, '66, '71, *'72, 
Alonzo F. Caswell, '72, '73, 
Joseph S. Brown, '72, '73, 



Jonathan Kendall, '42, '44, '52, 
George L. Huntoon, '66, '67, 
Nathaniel C. Sanborn, '71, '72, '73, 
George Stevens, * '73. 



Samuel A. McPhetres, City Clerk. 



Ward i. 
Charles A. Welch, '57, 
Frank Brady, '73, 
Stephen J. Smiley, '73, 
Charles H. Harvey. 

Ward 2. 
Daniel Stickney, '73, 
Edward P. Woods, '73, 
Charles J. Eastman, 
Edward E. Reed. 

Ward 3. 
Julius C. Jockow, '71, '72, 
James Owens, '73, 
James A. Loughlin, '73, 
George W. Tilton. 



Common Council: 

Ward 4. 
Charles T. Goddard, '71, 
Nathan W. Frye, '72, '73, President, 
Jacob H. Sawyer, *'73, 
Julian A. Richardson. 

Ward 5. 
Jared P. Maxfield, '73, 
John B. Lyford, 
Samuel P. Marin, 
John Scott. 

Ward 6. 
George W. S. Hurd, '73, 
Joel A. Abbott, 
Thomas Carolin, 
Jason Fuller. 



George Gardner, Clerk, died May 29. 
David Chase, Clerk, elected June 4. 



187 5. 



Mayor : 

FRANCIS JEWETT, '64, '65, *'6S, *'6 9 , f '73, t'74. 

Aldermen : 



Benj. Walker, '65, '66, '71, *'72, * '74, 

Jacob Rogers, 

John A. Goodwin, 

Joseph S. Brown, '72, '73, * '74, 



Hapgood Wright, '45, '46, * '56, * '69, 
James Owens, '73, '74, 
Alden B. Richardson, 
Samuel A. Chase. 



Samuel A. McPhetres, City Clerk. 
Common Council: 



Ward i 
Charles A. Welch, '57, '74, 
Charles H. Harvey, '74, 
John F. Howard, 
John W. Welch. 

Ward 2. 
Earl A. Thissell, '72, '73, 
Edward E. Reed, '74, 
William A. Read, 
Leavitt R. J. Varnum. 

Ward 3. 
Albert A. Haggett, '68, '69, % '70, *'7i, 
George W. Tilton, '74, [J '73, Pres. 
Charles Cowley, 
Thomas R. Garity. 



David Chase, Clerk. 



Ward 4. 
Josiah Butler, 
Francis Carll, 
Edward P. Dennis, 
Edward Stockman. 

Ward 5. 
James D. Hartwell, '70, 
John B. Lyford, '74, 
Orford R. Blood, 
Charles W. Sleeper. 

Ward 6. 
Joel A. Abbott, '74, 
Thomas Carolin, '74, 
Jason Fuller, '74, 
Albert p. Wright. 



ORDINANCES 



OF THE 



CITY OF LOWELL, 



PASSED SINCE THE PUBLICATION OF THE 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER OF 1875. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



59 



CITY OF LOWELL. 



In the year Eighteen Hundred and Seventy-Five. 



An Ordinance relating to Sales in Streets and Public 

Places. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Lowell, as follows : 

First. No person shall sell, or expose for sale, from any stand, 
booth, stall, cart, wagon, sleigh, or other vehicle, in any street, square, 
or public place within said city, any goods, chattels, or merchandise, 
unless licensed therefor by the Mayor and Aldermen, and paying for 
said license such sum as may be fixed by the Board of Aldermen ; 
provided that this Ordinance shall not be construed to apply to 
dealers in hay, straw, wood, or bark, who may sell, or offer for sale, 
the same from any established hay or wood stand, or to persons who 
may sell or offer for sale the products of farms, gardens, nurseries, 
and orchards, in places where it will not interfere with public travel. 

Second. Any person violating the provisions of this Ordinance 
shall, for each offence, forfeit the sum of twenty dollars. 

In Common Council, December 14, 1875. 
Passed to be ordained. Albert A. Haggett, President. 

In Board of Aldermen, December 20, 1875. 
Passed to be ordained. Francis Jewett, Mayor. 

Approved December 22, 1875. Francis Jewett, Mayor. 



60 MUNICIPAL EEGISTER. 



CITY OF LOWELL 



In the year Eighteen Hundred and Seventy-Five. 



An Ordinance relating to the Election op Officers of 

the City. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Lowell, as follows : 

Section 1. There shall be chosen annually, in the month of 
January or February, and whenever a vacancy occurs, by concurrent 
vote of both branches of the City Council, a City Marshal ; a City 
Solicitor ; a Superintendent of Streets ; an Auditor of Accounts ; a 
Superintendent of Public Buildings ; a Civil Engineer for the City ; 
a Librarian of the City Library ; six Directors of the City Library, 
from the citizens at large, one from each Ward ; a Messenger to the 
City Council ; a City Physician ; a Superintendent of Burials ; three 
Surveyors of Highways ; and five Assessors of Taxes. 

Section 2. All Ordinances or parts of Ordinances inconsistent 
herewith are hereby repealed. 

In Common Council, December 31, 1875. 
Passed to be ordained. Albert A. Haggett, President. 

In Board of Aldermen, December 31, 1875. 
Passed to be ordained. Francis Jewett, Mayor. 

Approved December 31, 1875. Francis Jewett, Mayor. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 61 



CITY OF LOWELL. 



In the year Eighteen Hundred and Seventy-Six. 



An Ordinance relating to the Election of Officers of 

the City. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Lowell, as follows : 

Section 1. There shall be chosen annually, in the month of 
January or February, and whenever a vacancy occurs, by concurrent 
vote of both branches of the City Council, six Assessors of Taxes. 
No Assessor of Taxes shall assess in the same ward for more than 
two consecutive years. Said Assessors shall hold their offices until 
their successors are chosen, or they are removed, and they shall be 
removable at the pleasure of the City Council. 

Section 2. There shall be chosen annually, in the month of 
January, by concurrent vote of both branches of the City Council, 
one member of the Board of Aldermen and two members of the 
Common Council, to be members of the Lowell Water Board, to 
hold office during the remainder of the municipal year in which they 
are elected, and until others are elected in their place, unless sooner 
removed. 

In the month of March or April, annually, there shall be chosen 
by concurrent vote of both branches of the City Council, one mem- 
ber of the Lowell Water Board from the citizens at large, to hold his 
office for two years from the first Monday in May in the year of his 
election, and until another is elected in his place, unless sooner re- 
moved. Said members elected from the City Council, and from the 
citizens at large, shall at all times be subject to removal from office 
by the City Council for cause ; and vacancies from any cause may 
be filled at any time, for the unexpired term, in the same manner as 
the original appointment. Provided, however, that any existing 



62 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

vacancies in said Board may be filled by tbe City Council at any 
time. 

In the month of March or April, annually, there shall be chosen 
by concurrent vote of both branches of the City Council, a Superin- 
tendent of the Water Works, to hold his office from the first Monday 
in May in the year of his election, and until another is elected in his 
place, unless sooner removed. 

Section 3. A Board of Health shall be elected, annually, in 
the month of January or February, or at any time when a vacancy 
shall occur, consisting of the Mayor ex officio, and one member of 
the Board of Aldermen, provided, however, that in case the Mayor 
declines to serve, there shall be chosen two members of the Board of 
Aldermen, to be elected by the Board of Aldermen, and three mem- 
bers of the Common Council, to be elected by said Council, with all 
the powers and duties assigned to Boards of Health by the Statutes 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Section 4. There shall be chosen, annually, in the month of 
January or February, by concurrent vote of both branches of the 
City Council, by nomination commencing in the Board of Aldermen, 
four or more Surveyors of Lumber, three Fence Viewers, four or 
more Field Drivers, one Pound Keeper, one or more Health Com- 
missioners, and ten or more Tythingmen. All officers named in this 
Section shall hold their offices until their successors are chosen, or 
they are removed. Any officer named in this Section shall be re- 
movable at the pleasure of the City Council. 

Section 5. The Mayor and Board of Aldermen shall annually, 
in the month of January or February, and at such other times as they 
deem expedient, appoint a Superintendent of the City Scales, two or 
more Measurers of Wood and Bark, two or more Weighers of Hay 
and other articles, one or more Weighers of Coal, a Sealer of Weights 
and Measures, an Inspector of Milk, an Inspector of Bale or Bundle 
Hay, a City Crier, four or more Constables, four or more Surveyors 
of Plastering, Brick or Stone Work, and Painting, t two or more Mea- 
surers of Grain, two or more Measurers of Wood and Bark brought 
by water or railroad cars into the city, and in the month of April, an- 
nually, two or more Measurers of Upper Leather, and on the first 
Wednesday of April, annually, the Chief and Assistant Engineers of 
the Fire Department, and on said day, or as soon thereafter as may 
be, the other members of the Fire Department. Said Engineers and 
Members shall hold their respective offices for the term of one year 
from the first day of May next succeeding their appointment, or un- 
til they are removed. All other officers named in this Section shall 



MUNICIPAL REGISTEK. 63 

hold their offices until their successors are appointed, or they are re- 
moved. Any officer named in this Section shall be removable at the 
pleasure of the Board of Aldermen. 

Section 6. The Mayor and Board of Aldermen may appoint, 
from time to time, such Police Officers and Watchmen as they may 
think necessary, with all the power of Constables, except the power 
of serving and executing civil process, and shall appoint from said 
Police Officers and Watchmen one or more Deputies, to be designated 
by the City Marshal, and said Deputies may act for the City Marshal, 
in his absence, by consent of the Mayor. Any Officers appointed 
under the authority of this Section, may be removed at any time by 
the Board of Aldermen. 

In Common Council, January 11, 1876. 
Passed to be ordained. Benjamin C. Dean, President. 

In Board of Aldermen, January 11, 1876. 
Passed to be ordained. John A. Goodwin, Chairman. 

January 11, 1876 ; approved. Chas. A. Stott, Mayor. 



64 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



CITY OF LOWELL. 



In the year Eighteen Hundred and Seventy-Six. 



An Ordinance to amend Chapter One, Section One, of the 
Ordinances op the City op Lowell. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Lowell, as follows : 

That Chapter One, Section One, of the Ordinances of the City 
of Lowell, be amended by striking out the word "joint" in the first 
line of said Section, and by striking out, after the word " Mayor," 
the words " on the part of the Board of Aldermen," and inserting in 
place thereof the words " one member of the Board of Aldermen, to 
be elected by said Board, by ballot." 

In Common Council, January 11, 1876. 
Passed to be ordained. Benjamin C. Dean, President. 

In Board of Aldermen, January 11, 1876. 
Passed to be ordained. John A. Goodwin,. Chairman. 

January 11, 1876; approved. Chas. A. Stott, Mayor. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 65 



CITY OF LOWELL. 



In the year Eighteen Hundred and Seventy-Six. 



An Ordinance relating to the Committee on Appropriations. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Lowell, as follows : 

Section 1. The Committee on Appropriations shall hereafter 
consist of the Mayor, the Chairman of the Joint Standing Committee 
on Streets, the Chairman of the Joint Standing Committee on Lands 
and Buildings, the Chairman of the Standing Committee on Sewers, 
the member of the Lowell Water Board elected from the Board of 
Aldermen, and four members of the Common Council : one from the 
Joint Committee on Education, one from the Joint Committee on 
Fire Department, one from the Joint Committee on Commons, and 
one from the Joint Committee on Printing, to be appointed by the 
Common Council. 

Section 2. Any Ordinance or part of any Ordinance incon- 
sistent herewith is hereby repealed. 

In Common Council, February 8, 1876. 
Passed to be ordained. Benjamin C. Dean, President. 

In Board of Aldermen, February 8, 1876. 
Passed to be ordained. John A. Goodwin, Chairman. 

February 8, 1876 ; approved. Chas. A. Stott, Mayor. 



66 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



CITY OF LOWELL 



In the year Eighteen Hundred and Seventy-Six. 



An Ordinance Amending an " Ordinance Providing for the 
Care and Management op the Lowell Water Works," 
Passed July 11, 1872. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Lowell, as follows : 

That Section 12, sixth line, after the word " that " be amended 
by striking out the following words, " in cases of specific supplies or 
for fractional parts of the year, where the water has been let on, it 
may be cut off immediately after notice given at the place that the 
rent is not paid, and may be let on again upon the condition before 
mentioned," and inserting the following words, " in any case where 
the water may have been let on by mistake or otherwise before pay- 
ment of the water rate, and contrary to Section 11, it may be cut off 
without notice." That Section 15, ninth line, after the word " Board " 
be amended by striking out the following words, " or by authority 
of the Mayor and Aldermen," and inserting the word, " Superintend- 
ent," and in the tenth line, after the word "Department," by insert- 
ing the following words, " who may open them for Fire Department 
purposes." That Section 20, tenth line, after the word " each " be 
amended by striking out the word " person," and after the word 
"additional" by inserting the word "person," in the thirteenth line, after 
the word " two," by inserting the word " set," in the fifteenth line, after 
the word " all " by inserting the word " set," in the twenty -sixth line, 
after the word " assessed, by striking out the words " seventy-five," 
and by inserting the word " fifty," in the twenty-eighth line after the 
word " three " by striking out the word " dollars " and inserting the 
words " or more than eight dollars," in the thirty-first line, after the 
word " each," by inserting the following words, " if supplied with city 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 67 

water either by faucet, hose or spout," in the thirty-fifth line, after 
the word " children " by striking out the word " and," after the word 
" servants" by inserting the words " and lodgers," in the forty -third 
line, after the word " cents," by inserting the following words, '' club 
stables, for each horse, owned by different persons, four dollars ; for 
each additional horse, owned by such persons, two dollars," in the 
forty-fifth line, after the word " windows," by inserting the word 
" and," after the word " gardens," by striking out the following words, 
" or for use in stables in addition to the charge for other uses not less 
than," and by inserting the words " shall be," in the forty-seventh 
line, after the word " dollars," by striking* out the following words, 
" the use of the same shall be limited to one hour per day," and by 
inserting the following words, " per year or fractional part thereof, 
and where the same connection is also used for washing carriages, 
charge shall be made for such double use, provided, stable rates are 
not charged." The use of water through hose shall be limited to one 
hour per day ; and is prohibited on the public streets, between the 
hours of eight a. m. and six p. m. 

Churches, first faucet, six dollars ; each additional faucet, three 
dollars ; water closet, four dollars ; each additional water closet, two 
dollars ; baptistery, two dollars ; hose, three dollars ; urinal, three 
dollars. 

Apothecaries, ten dollars. 

Photograph galleries, fifteen dollars. 

Saloons, ten to twenty-five dollars. 

Bar-rooms, five to twenty-five dollars. 

Meat markets, six to fifteen dollars. 

Fish markets, six to fifteen dollars. 

Tumbler washers, three dollars each. 

Private fountains, three to ten dollars each. 

Portable fountains, three to ten dollars each. 

Aquaria, three dollars each. 

Barber shops, four chairs or less, six dollars ; each additional 
chair, one dollar. 

Bakeries, for the average daily use of flour, for each barrel, the 
sum of three dollars per annum, provided that in no case shall any 
bakery be charged less than six dollars per annum. 

In the fifty-ninth line, after the word " hotels," by striking out 
the word " taverns," in the sixty-second line, after the letter " a," by 
striking out the word " sufficient," after the last line, in Section 20, by 
adding the following words, " where two or more takers draw from 



68 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

the same service, the water shall be charged to the owner of the 
service." 

Fire services shall not be used for supplying water for any pur- 
pose except in case of fire, or in testing the service. 

"New services shall be charged one family rate at least, for one 
year from the time such service is put in, whether the water is taken 
or not." 

" The water rates established by this section permit the use of the 
water only upon the premises for which such rates are charged." 

In Common Council, March 14, 1876. 
Passed to be ordained. Benjamin C. Dean, President. 

In Board of Aldermen, March 14, 1876. 
Passed to be ordained. John A. Goodwin, Chairman. 

Approved March 14, 1876. Chas. A. Stott, Mayor. 



FIFTIETH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



CITY OF LOWELL, 



TOGETHER WITH THE 



TWELFTH ANNUAL EBPORT 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

1875. 




LOWELL, MASS.: 

STONE, HUSE & CO., STEAM BOOK AND JOB PRINTERS, No. 130 CENTRAL STREET. 

18*76. 



CITY OF LOWELL. 



In School Committee, / 
January 1, 1876. ) 

Benj. J. Williams, Esq., Chairman of the Committee on Eeports, 
having presented the subjoined Eeport this day, it was unanimously adopted 
as the Eeport of the School Committee, for 1875. 

The Superintendent having at the same time submitted his Annual 
Eeport, it was unanimously accepted. 

It was voted that four thousand copies of the above Eeports be printed 
and distributed, under the direction of the Committee on Eeports and the 
Superintendent. 

CHAELES MOEEILL, Secretary. 



EEPOET. 



In reviewing the work which has been accomplished 
in the public schools of the City of Lowell during the 
past year, the School Committee do not propose to enter 
into the details and particulars of the same, because they 
will be found fully set forth in the accompanying Report 
of the Superintendent, hereby referred to for such details 
and particulars. The # Committee, therefore, will confine 
themselves to such general remarks and suggestions as 
seem to them most urgent concerning the state of our 
schools, whether with respect to their merits or defects. 
And, in the beginning, the Committee desire to assure 
their constituents of the certain and steady improvement, 
upon the whole, manifest during the past year as in 
previous ones, in the character of our school manage- 
ment and accommodation. This improvement is especially 
shown in a more general diffusion of intelligent and 
kindly methods of instruction and government, with greater 
consequent sympathy between teachers and scholars, and 
all its advantages to both : in better and more comfort- 
able school-houses and furniture, and in better and more 



4 SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S EEPORT. 

healthful means of warming and ventilating the school- 
houses. But while the Committee recognize and assert 
the growing improvement in these respects, they at the 
same time are profoundly impressed by the still existing 
lamentable defects in these very things in so many of 
our schools. 

The wise and humane rule of the Board which pro- 
hibits corporal punishment in the schools excepting when 
other means fail, though, as the Committee believe, gen- 
erally recognized and followed by the great body of our 
teachers, yet the Committee feel obliged to declare, that 
there are still too many cases in the Grammar and 
Primary Schools of the ignoring of this rule by teachers, 
and the infliction by them, in sudden haste or passion, 
of corporal punishment without first resorting to other 
means of control. The cruel and unjust practice, too, of 
punishing scholars for failing in recitations, no matter how 
hard they may have studied and toiled not to fail, still 
exists, in exceptional instances, in these schools, a linger- 
ing relic of a barbarity once generally prevalent. Further, 
the Committee fear, that we have still too many teachers 
wandering in the old error, that their only duty is to 
keep order and hear recitations, quite forgetful of the 
chief and ultimate object of their vocation, to teach and 
instruct the mind of the scholar, and to assist it in 
overcoming the difficulties attendant upon its develop- 
ment and its progress in the acquisition of knowledge. 
The Committee, however, while thus briefly referring to 
certain of the faults still existing to some extent in the 
practice of some teachers, yet recognizing the many trials 



t 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S KEPORT. 5 

and difficulties with which teachers are called to contend, 
the reference is made in the kindest spirit towards them, 
and in full confidence that every teacher who, upon self- 
examination, is convinced of having erred in any of the 
respects mentioned, will earnestly seek to correct the 
error. Certainly as a class no public servants are more 
conscientious or devoted in their labors than the teachers 
in the public schools, and it is feared that they are all 
too little appreciated by the general public. It is often 
said, that their hours of employment are less than in 
most* other occupations, and this is true ; but it is for- 
gotten that they are obliged to go to their labors at 
stated times in all weather; that in governing and con- 
trolling their schools they are performing the work of a 
presiding officer — a work always regarded as peculiarly 
onerous and exhausting, and which can with difficulty 
be followed more than a limited time each day — and 
teachers are presiding over children, who, from their 
comparative lack of reason and self-restraint, are much 
more difficult of control in schools than men in parlia- 
mentary assemblages. Then, when it is considered, that 
while presiding and maintaining order, the teacher is also 
required to be employed in the delicate and troublesome 
work of developing and drawing forth the faculties of 
the immature mind of the scholar, the truth must become 
apparent, that no human employment can be more wear- 
ing and destructive to the whole bodily, mental and 
nervous systems than that of school-teaching. They who 
follow this employment — precarious in its character, because 
dependent upon annual elections, in which whim and 



I 

6 SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 

prejudice may prevail against justice — certainly deserve 
all the compensation, and whatever honor they receive. 

With all that has been done during the past year, 
and in the years immediately preceding, in the improve- 
ment of our school-houses, and their furniture, warming 
and ventilation, still very much more remains to be done 
in simple regard to the health and lives both of teachers 
and scholars. In many of our schools there are now from 
fifty to eight} 7 children crowded into a single room without 
proper space, considering the imperfect ventilation, for 
more than half the number, no regard apparently feeing 
had for those common and well-known laws of health 
which require for it as a first requisite an abundance of 
pure and fresh air. And in most of our school-houses 
to-day there are not really fair and tolerable means of 
ventilation. More, perhaps, has been done to advantage 
in recent years in removing old and uncomfortable school 
furniture and substituting modern and comfortable kinds, 
than in the matter of ventilation, but there is still ample 
opportunity for improvement in this regard. In the matter 
of the means of warming our school-houses there is very 
much yet to be desired. Stoves, still employed in most 
of our Primary Schools, ought not to be used where it 
is practicable to substitute other means of warmth, as 
they consume the air of the rooms in which they are in 
use. The best and only truly proper methods of warming 
are those which are united with the means of ventilating, 
blending the two together in one system, calculated to 
secure a uniform and. proper temperature of the' air, and 
at the same time to keep it constantly pure. The sys- 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 7 

tern of heat and ventilation employed in the Green 
School-honse substantially accomplishes these objects. 
The Committee deeply regret that the same cannot be 
fully said of any other school-house in the city. 

But whatever may be wanting in or concerning our 
school-houses, the Committee, notwithstanding, would not 
think of urging, in this time of general depression and 
stagnation of business, any great or unusual expendi- 
tures concerning the same. They do, however, suggest 
that much may be done in the vital matters in question 
by expending hereafter more upon them, and less upon 
objects of mere superficial appearance. The Committee 
highly estimate the importance of artistic effects, so far 
as practicable, in the construction of our school buildings, 
but true art is not necessarily expensive ; money does 
not create it ; it comes from taste and culture, and 
without any sacrifice of its just claims, something, cer- 
tainly, may be spared from its extravagant and oftentimes 
meretricious expression in our new school-houses, to be 
applied in the practical lessening of the actual suffering, 
sickness and death produced by the over-crowding, ill- 
ventilating and imperfect warming of all the old ones. 
For instance, it cannot be doubted, that little more than 
one-half of the money expended in the construction and 
furnishing of the Green School-house might have been 
made to build and equip a school-house substantially as 
good as the present one, with just as pure though not 
so showy architecture, and the balance of the expendi- 
ture upon it would have been more than sufficient to 
properly warm and ventilate, according to the most 



8 SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S EEPOET. 

approved systems, all the other Grammar School build- 
ings in the city, still in sore want of such advantages. 

With reference to all these defects in our public 
schools, thus alluded to in this Report, and the many 
others which may exist in them, much, very much, may 
be done for their removal by the earnest and constant 
effort of this Board, and of its Standing and Sub- 
Committees. The Sub-Committees, especially, too often 
accustomed, since the establishment of the office of 
Superintendent, to quite neglect their duty frequently 
to visit the schools under their charge, and observe their 
condition, conduct and wants, by the exercise of their 
authority and influence at all times in a faithful watch- 
fulness of the schools in their keeping, will be enabled, 
while cheering, encouraging and directing the Superin- 
tendent in the discharge of his duties as the executive 
officer of the Board, to have a real, intelligent and living 
control of the school interests committed by the people 
to their guardianship, such as they do not now enjoy, 
and to the great and manifest improvement and advance- 
ment of these interests. 



ORGANIZATION 



OF THE 



School Committee, 18^5 



FRANCIS JEWETT, Chairman. 
JOSIAH G. PEABODY, Vice-Chairman. 
CHARLES MORRILL, Secretary. 



MEMBERS OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

FRANCIS JEWETT, Mayor, ) 

> Ex-OMciis 

ALBERT A. HAGGETT, President of Common Council, . ) ' M 

Ward 1— JOHN W. SMITH, ...... Term Expires 1875. 

JAMES W. B. SHAW, " " 1876. 

,« 2— CYRUS H. LATHAM, ....." « 1875. 

GEORGE H. PILLSBURY, . . . . " " 1876. 

" 3— GEORGE E. PINKHAM, " " 1875. 

EPHRAIM B. PATCH, " " 1876. 

" 4— WILLIAM H. ANDERSON, . . . . " " 1875. 

CHARLES KIMBALL, " " 1876. 

" 5— JOSIAH G. PEABODY, .,...." " 1875. 

WILLIAM G. WARD, " " 1876. 

« 6— BENJAMIN J. WILLIAMS " " 1875. 

GEORGE F. LAWTON. . . '. . , '< " 1876. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Accounts — Messrs. Jewett, Haggett, Shaw, Ward and Peabody. 

On School-Houses— Messrs. Shaw, Pinkham, 'Kimball, Pillsbury and Smith. 

On Teachers — Messrs. Kimball, Anderson, Pillsbury, Pinkham and Lawton. 

On Reports — Messrs. Williams, Anderson, Lawton, Latham and Patch. 

On Books — Messrs. Anderson, Kimball, Shaw, Williams, Lawton and Haggett. 

On Salaries — Messrs. Jewett, Haggett, Peabody, Williams and Pinkham. 

On Penmanship and Drawing — Messrs. Ward, Pillsbury, Latham, Lawton 

and Smith. 
On Music — Messrs. Haggett, Ward, Pinkham, Latham and Shaw. 
On Evening Schools — Messrs. Latham, Peabody, Ward, Patch and Smith. 
ON Suspension of Schools — Messrs. Jewett, Pillsbury and Patch. 



CHARLES MORRILL, Superintendent of Public Schools. 
Office in City Government Building. 



ORGANIZATION 



School Committee, 1876. 



CHARLES A. STOTT, Chairman. 
EPHRAIM B. PATCH, Tice-Chairman. 
CHARLES MORRILL, Secretary. 



MEMBERS OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

CHARLES A. STOTT, Mayor, . . . . 
BENJAMIN C. DEAN, President of Common Council, 
"Ward 1— JAMES W. B. SHAW, 
WILLIAM M. HOAR, 
. " 2— GEORGE H. PILLSBURY 
ROBERT L. READ, . 
" 3— EPHRAIM B. PATCH, 

JOHN J. GREEN, . 

" 4— CHARLES KIMBALL, 

HENRY P. CARTER, 

" 5— WILLIAM G. WARD, 

JOHN J. COLTON, . 

" 6— GEORGE F. LAWTON, 

LORENZO S. FOX, . 



> Ex-Officiis. 

Term Expires 1876. 

1877. 
1876. 
1877. 
1876. 
1877. 
1876. 
1877. 
1876. 
1877. 
1876. 
1877. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Accounts — Messrs. Stott, Patch, Ward, Dean and Shaw. 

On School-Houses — Messrs. Pillsbury, Patch, Fox, Carter and Hoar. 

On Teachers — Messrs. Morrill, Kimball, Lawton, Pillsbury, Colton and Green. 

On Reports — Messrs. Lawton, Colton, Read, Green and Carter. 

On Books — Messrs. Kimball, Pillsbury, Lawton, Shaw, Green and Hoar. 

On Salaries — Messrs. Stott, Dean, Patch, Fox and Hoar. 

On Penmanship and Drawing — Messrs. Ward, Fox, Dean, Read and 

Pillsbury. 
On Music — Messrs. Shaw, Read, Ward, Lawton and Kimball. 
On Free Evening Schools — Messrs. Patch, Ward, Carter, Read and Colton. 
On Suspension of the Schools — Messrs. Stott, Shaw and Kimball. 



CHARLES MORRILL, Superintendent of Public Schools, 

Office in City Government Building. 



TWELFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

1875. 



Superintendent's Report. 



To the School Committee of Lowell : 

In conformity with your rules, I submit the following 
report : 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 

Value of real and personal property, i $38,694,555 

Population, 49,677 

Number of polls, 11,250 

Increase for the year, 124 

Number of^ children in the city between five and fifteen years of 

age, May 1, 1875, as returned by the Truant Officers, . 7,344 

In Ward One, 647; Ward Two, 1,091; Ward Three, 1,646; 
Ward Four, 1,305; Ward Five, 1,782; Ward Six, 873. 

Increase for the year, 773 

Number of public schools in the city, 70 

One High, nine Grammar, fifty-eight Primaries and two 
Mixed. 

Increase for the year, ........ 1 

Number of teachers employed in them, 133 

High School, three males and seven females. 

Grammar Schools, seven males and fifty-four females. 

Primaries, fifty-eight females. 

Mixed, two females. 

One teacher of penmanship and drawing for the High and 
Grammar Schools. 

One teacher of music for all the schools. 

Increase for the year, 3 

Average number of scholars belonging to all the schools, . . 5,533 

High, 297; Grammar, 2,337; Primary, 2,853; Mixed, 46. 

Increase for the year, 8? 

Average attendance in all the schools, 5,031 

High, 292; Grammar, 2,119; Primary, 2,580; Mixed, 40. 

Increase for the year, . . . •• i 99 

1 



14 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



Average number belonging to each teacher, ..... 42.2 

High, 29.7; Grammar, 38.8; Primary 5 49.2; Mixed, 23. 

Average per cent, attendance, 90.9 

High, 98; Grammar, 90.6; Primary, 90.4; Mixed, 87. 
Average cost of each scholar for tuition only, calculated on the 

average number belonging, $16,265 

High, $39,331; Grammar, $18,863; Primary, $11,602; Mixed, 
$23,478. [The salaries of the teachers of penmanship 
and drawing and of vocal music are divided among the 
different grades of schools in proportion to the time 
spent in them.] 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1875, $ 14,909.59 

Appropriated and assessed for 1876, 125,000.00 

Received from various sources, 985.55 



Total amount standing to the credit of schools, 



$140,895.14 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid for instruction : 
















Grammar Schools — 




Bartlett School, 6,024.51 




Colburn School, 








4,765.72 




Edson School, 








5,754.29 




Franklin School, . 








3,915.89 




Green School, 








6,287.97 




Mann School, 








3,270.00 




Moody School, 








6,010.00 




Sherman School, . 








1,000.00 




Varnum School, . 








4,941.70 




» 


41,970.08 


Pi'imary Schools (including Mixed), 


33,416.50 


Teacher of penmanship and drawing, i 


1,500.00 


Teacher of vocal music, 


• 


■ 


i 


* 


1,696.43 



Total paid for instruction in day schools, . * t 

There were also paid for 

Evening Schools, including tuition, rent, fuel, 

gas, janitors, police and incidentals, . . $4,880.48 

Evening Drawing Schools, including tuition, di- 
agrams, &c, janitors, gas and incidentals, . 3,715.81 

Drawing and writing books to July, . . . 1,115.06 

Books, &c, furnished indigent children, $795.26, 
and books, charts, &c, furnished schools^ 
$245.92, 1,041.18 



$S9,944.67 



Amounts carried forward, $10,752.53 $89,944.67 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 15 



Amounts brought forward, . ... • , . $10,752,53 $89,944.67 
Janitors of day schools, including those teachers 

who take care of their own rooms, . . 5,341.44 

Superintendent of Streets' bill (mostly for fuel), 6,243.30 
Superintendent of Public Buildings' bill for 

labor, ......... 1,659.00 

Water, 634.50 

Heating High School-house, .... 500.00 
Superintendent of Schools and Secretary of the 

School Committee, 2,500.00 

Two Truant Officers, 2,000.00 

Miscellaneous, ....... 7,164.41 

— . 36,795.18 

Total expenditure, . . . . . $126,739.85 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1876, . , 14,155.29 



$140,895.14 
SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1875, .... $ 2,575.59 

Appropriated and assessed, 36,000.00 

Received from various sources, 9,469.64 

$48,045.23 

Expenditures, $42,312.76 

Transferred to Appropriation for Repairs of Public 

Buildings, 5,000.00 

$47,312.76 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1876, 732,47 



$48,045.23 



SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

Excellent accommodations have been furnished by 
the city for the Primaries on Cross, Adams and Salem 
Streets. The lot upon which the new house stands includes 
the lot occupied by Primary No. 32 on Adams Street and 
the land adjoining in the rear as far as Common Street. It 
contains about fifteen thousand square feet. It was, origin- 
ally, the intention to have the house face on Adams Street, 
but this could not be done without seriously discommoding 
the school in the old building by moving it to other quarters. 
The advantages of its present location are more light and a 
pleasant play-ground on the east, which perhaps counter^ 



16 SUPEKINTENDENT'S EEPOET. 

balance those of a fine view and the larger common on the 
west. 

The building, including the basement and the mansard 
roof, is four stories high. In the basement are a large play- 
room, boiler-room, coal-room, water closets, stairways and 
two narrow passage ways leading from the Common Street 
entrances to the play-room. On one side of each passage 
way is the boiler-room, on the other side are the water 
closets and the stairways. There are, also, two entrances 
to the play-room from the yard on the Adams Street side. 
A flight of eleven stone steps leads up to the main entrance 
to the building on the west side. Through a small vestibule 
you pass into a corridor which extends on either side to the 
stairways and in front through the centre of the building to 
the rear entrance which, in structure, is similar to the front. 
On each side of this latter passage way are a school-room and 
wardrobe. There is the same arrangement of rooms above 
except that there is no central passage way. The rooms are, 
therefore, about four feet wider than those below. A hall 
occupies all the room on the third floor except that taken 
up by stairways and landings. All the rooms from the 
basement to the roof are spacious, well arranged, ventilated 
and lighted, heated by steam conducted through pipes around 
the room, and well furnished. The cost of the building was 
about $32,000. It is by far the best Primary school-house 
in the city, and the people accommodated are very proud 
of it. 

It would give me great pleasure to be able to give a 
description of another building which the committee hoped 
to see erected on Kirk Street on the lot purchased for the 
purpose three years ago and which has been deferred on 
account of the greater need of accommodations for the 
Primaries near Common Street. Although the case was 
declared one of urgency the city council did not think it 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 17 

best to appropriate money enough to erect both, and re- 
newed efforts must be made for the better accommodations 
of Primaries 1 and 3. The only step taken in this direction 
was the making of a school-room of the parlors and entries 
of the two tenements in the north end of the building to 
accommodate the upper classes of Primary No. 3, which now 
form Primary No. 1. Seats were placed there for about 
forty-five scholars, and we may say they are as comfortable 
as could be expected under the circumstances. 

I think that that part of the resolution asking accom- 
modations for the School Committee and their officers caused 
the request of the Board to be looked upon with disfavor. 
I suggest that a resolution, setting forth the necessity of 
further and better accommodations for the Primary Schools 
1 and 3, for the Art Schools now occupying Green School 
Hall, and possibly to relieve the High School at no distant 
day, would be regarded with more favor, especially if ac- 
companied with the proper statistics. 

Besides the expenditures on Common Street, $200 were 
spent in altering over the Colburn School-house ; $500, for 
shingling, painting, changing the seats and renovating the 
house at Pawtucketville, besides grading and fencing the 
lot ; $200, on the house at Middlesex Village ; $250, in 
making alterations in the High School-house; and $75, on 
the house on Varnum Avenue. 

In May an order was passed by the Board requesting 
the city council to furnish a primary school-house for the 
accommodation of pupils in the vicinity of Coral and Walker 
Streets, and another, earnestly requesting the same body to 
furnish additional primary school accommodations for the 
citizens of Ward Three. 

The reason urged for the former, was the distance of 
the scholars from the nearest school-house, and for the 
latter, insufficient accommodations. Both orders were trans- 



18 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 

mitted to the city council and referred to the Committee on 
Public Instruction. On conferring with the chairman of 
that committee, I learned that probably the reason urged 
against the erection of the building on Kirk Street, "viz: 
economy, would prevent favorable action of the council on 
both requests of the Committee. 

I suggest that the incoming Board renew their requests 
to the city council at their first meeting. Sufficient statis- 
tics can be furnished to show their reasonableness. 

FARM SCHOOL. 

By the revised city charter it is made " the duty of 
the School Committee to exercise the same supervision and 
control over any institution of instruction and house of re- 
formation established by the city council, as they are by 
law required to exercise over the public schools, as far as 
practicable." 

It has been agreed by the Board and the Overseers of 
the Poor that their duties will have been performed in rela- 
tion to the House of Reformation at the Farm when they 
have visited said school, prescribed the studies to be pur- 
sued, and the text books to be used. 

I have visited the school but twice, but I am able to 
say that its excellent teacher, William A. Lang, seems es- 
pecially adapted to the position he occupies. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

Including the School at Pawtucketville, the number of 
primaries is fifty-eight. Old No. 1 formerly located on 
Middle Street was disbanded in 1872, and its scholars sent, 
some to No. 8 on Worthen Street, some to No. 12, then on 
Tilden Street. Last September, No. 3 on Paige Street, 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 19 

being very large, was divided, and the three upper classes 
were moved into the temporary accommodations arranged 
for them on Kirk Street. Miss Hattie H. Eaton was ap- 
pointed teacher, and the school was designated as No. 1. 
The number belonging to the two schools, at the close of 
the last term, was eighty-one. During the last half of the 
term, No. 3 was under the charge of a temporary teacher, 
Miss Watson being absent on account of sickness. These 
two primaries are the only ones in Ward Two this side of 
Merrimack River. 

The number of primaries in Ward One is seven, 
three of which are in the Mann School-house, and the 
others in the Worthen Street house. Those in the Mann 
School-house are always full, especially No. 41. The 
average number of scholars belonging to the three schools 
during the year is one hundred and sixty-seven — five more 
than the number of seats. The average number belonging 
to the four Worthen Street schools, with far better accom- 
modations, is, one hundred and eighty-three — thirty less than 
the number of seats. One of the causes of this latter con- 
dition of things is, doubtless, the unwillingness of some 
parents on the corporations to send their children across 
Merrimack and Market Streets, preferring rather to send 
them to Cabot Street. 

The three schools on Cabot and Race Streets, in Ward 
Five, graded together last year, have increased in numbers, 
are working together very well, and are excellent schools. 

Primaries 11 and 43 on Cross Street, 32 on Adams 
Street and 26 on Salem Street moved into the new building 
on Common Street in October. No change was made in 
the grading. No. 32 remains an ungraded school, and the 
others are graded into schools of two classes each. The 
average number belonging for the year to No. 32, Miss 



20 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 

Coughlan. teacher, is seventy-five; to the other three schools, 
forty-nine each. They are all good schools. 

Indeed I may say that all the primaries in this ward, in- 
cluding those on the Dracut side, are in excellent condition. 

The schools in Centralville are crowded, the average 
number belonging being greater than the number of seats, 
and in Primaries 47 a»ncl 55 largely in excess. 

Miss Ella S. Stanwood, teacher of No. 55, resigned in 
April, and Miss Nellie S. Danforth was appointed her suc- 
cessor. This school is the largest in Centralville, the num- 
ber belonging at the close of the term being sixty-seven — 
thirteen more than the number of fixed seats. Miss Dan- 
forth had had no experience, but was favored in receiving an 
excellent school, and she has succeeded quite well. 

The number of primaries in Belvidere is six, the same 
as last year. At the commencement of the May term, the 
number reported as present, the first week, in the schools of 
the three lower grades was two hundred and eight — forty- 
six more than the number of seats. To accommodate this 
large number a' new department was opened in the hall of 
the High Street primary school-house, which was placed 
under the charge of Miss Nellie M. Brown, who had admir- 
able success. The number reported as belonging at the 
close of the term was two hundred and twenty-seven. 

At the beginning of the last term, and after the usual 
promotions had been made, there were in the three lowest 
grades, Nos. 14, 16 and 35, one hundred and ninety-three 
scholars — an average of ten more than the number of seats 
in each school. As the number of applicants for admission 
to the schools was constantly increasing, on consultation 
with the proper sub-committees, another promotion to the 
Moody School was made from the upper grade of primaries, 
and a consequent promotion to the upper grade from the 



SUPEKINTENDENT'S EEPOKT. 21 

lower. This course was deemed advisable in order to avoid 
the necessity of continuing the branch school of the lower 
grade in the hall of the High Street primary. There was 
plenty of room in the Moody School for the classes from the 
primaries, as there were more than one hundred unoccupied 
seats there, and teachers and sub-committee favored the 
arrangement. The effect of this action was, of course, to 
lower the standing of all the schools, even those of the 
lowest grade, and consequently less will be expected of 
those schools for some time. The primaries, however, are 
doing remarkably well, and even now will not suffer in com- 
parison with some other schools that were not depleted. 

The number of primaries in Ward Three is seventeen, 
all of which are graded into schools of three classes each, 
except those at the Bleachery, which have two classes each. 
With an exception or two they are excellent schools. Miss 
Rice, of Primary No. 7, on Chapel Street, resigned in No- 
vember, and Miss Williams, of Primary No. 9, on Church 
Street, was transferred to the place made vacant, and Miss 
McLaughlan was placed in charge of No. 9. ' Both Miss Bice 
and Miss Williams were experienced and successful teachers, 
the latter having been elected in 1854. No teacher, how- 
ever, is less wedded to her own ways or more ready to carry 
into practice any orders or suggestions of committee or 
superintendent. Miss McLaughlan has taught less than 
seven weeks, and it is too early to speak confidently of her 
future. She is very pleasant with her charge, keeps good 
order, and promises to succeed. Of the seventeen schools 
in this ward eight are of the upper grade, and one hundred 
and thirty-two scholars were promoted from them to the 
grammar schools — the Colburn receiving sixty-seven, and 
the Edson the remainder, with about fifty more from the 
primaries on Elliott and Howard Streets, in Ward Four. 



22 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPOET. 

Four primaries on Elliott Street, No. 24 on Howard 
Street, No., 28 on Grand Street, three in the Franklin 
School-house, and No. 31 in the Sherman School, are all 
the primaries in Ward Four, and they have, generally, been 
good schools. 

In the schools on Ames Street, both of the lower 
grade, and in the two lower grades in the Franklin School- 
house, Dr. Leigh's system of learning to read is followed. 
The teachers of those schools meet with much better success 
in teaching reading than in most other schools of the same 
material, and they express themselves as admirers of the 
system and would very unwillingly return to the old method. 
The enunciation of scholars taught by this method is very 
clear and is observed in every stage of their progress after 
hating laid down their primers and taken up the books 
printed in common letters. In some schools, however, a 
return to the old system has been found advisable. 

Geography has been stricken from the course of study 
in these schools, chiefly because for small children ,more 
attention should be paid to reading, spelling, writing and 
drawing. Of these last subjects many pleasant things 
could be written. Suffice it to say that specimens of writ- 
ing and drawing from the primary schools could be exhibited 
that- would do credit to quite advanced classes in some of 
the grammar schools. 

MIXED SCHOOLS. 

There are only two of this class of schools now, that 
at Pawtucketville being reckoned among the primaries. 
Both of the schools are doing very well, though there is 
some impatience at Middlesex Village, probably in conse- 
quence of being within the sound of the Franklin School 
bell. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 23 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

An attempt has been made during the year to make 
these more than merely preparatory schools to the High 
School, by granting diplomas of graduation to all those 
scholars who satisfactorily complete the course of study 
laid down for them. Heretofore, and to some extent even 
now, the grammar schools have been ranked by the number 
of scholars sent to the High School. It is believed that 
this tendency may be overcome, and the High School sup- 
plied with a better class of scholars, if the standard of 
qualification is raised in the grammar ^schools. When the 
time comes* that a grammar master is chagrined by the low 
rank of his own school in order and scholarship, rather than 
by his failure as a crammer for the High School, then we 
shall hear fewer complaints of the meagre attainments of 
graduates from either grade of schools. 

Business men, indeed, cannot be made in a school, but 
business habits can be formed there, and the rudiments of 
knowledge may be so taught, and the minds of the scholars 
so disciplined, as to help to make them successful in apply- 
ing what they learn, whatever occupation they may follow. 

The grammar schools should be highly cherished. Pa- 
rents should visit them often and should co-operate with 
the teachers in their efforts to improve the minds and man- 
ners of their children. Let them show by their frequent 
visits to the school their appreciation of the labors of the 
teachers in every department, and a stronger interest will 
soon be manifested by the principal to make the school an 
institution valuable in itself, and not as a means to an un- 
worthy end. 

At the close of the term in July diplomas were given 
to scholars who had gone through the course of study. 
The examination preparatory was not as thorough as it will 



24 SUPEKINTEKDENT'S REPORT. 

hereafter be expected to be. It is hoped, however, that a 
step has been taken in the right direction. 

Another valuable practice has obtained in nearly 
all the schools : that of monthly written examinations. In 
the Bartlett, Edson and Varnum Schools, especially, they are 
regularly held, and the results show that they are highly 
appreciated by teachers and scholars. Such examinations 
require much time and labor on the part of the teachers, 
but they have not been sparing of either. 

The duty of a careful supervision of all the depart- 
ments, too, has been devolved upon the principals who have 
assistants in their *ooms, and the good effect of* a faithful 
discharge of this duty is very marked. 

The Colburn School-house was altered in the summer 
vacation, for the purpose of introducing the 'system into 
that school. 

The Franklin and Mann retain the recitation-room, and 
thorough supervision by the principal is in them with more 
difficulty accomplished. 

The Edson is the largest of the grammar schools, and 
is now suffering from the large number of scholars that have 
been forced into the school from the primaries. This year 
and last it received two hundred and twenty-seven scholars. 
The principal, Calvin W. Burbank, is a very methodical man 
and an excellent teacher and manager, but he is sometimes 
at his wits' end to know what is the best course for him 
to pursue. This summer the gates will have to be closed, 
for it will be impossible to make room for half of those who 
will seek admission to the school. A partial remedy for 
this state of things could be found in fitting up a room in 
the attic of his school-house, or in erecting a primary school- 
house, as asked for in Ward Four, and moving two of the 
primaries in the Franklin School-house into it, and devoting 
the rooms vacated to grammar school purposes. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 25 

The Sherman School presents a problem to be solved. 
The teacher, Miss Davis, has resigned her charge, and it is 
a proper time to make a change. It never has been a 
grammar school in anything bnt name. With less than fifty 
scholars, of the ages and attainments of the eight classes in 
the other grammar schools, unaided the teacher has been 
expected to teach all the grammar school studies and fit a 
proper number of scholars for the High School every year. 
She has faithfully labored for the good of the school, but no 
teacher could satisfy the demands made upon her. From 
the origin of the school there has been trouble. Many of 
the parents insisted upon having a grammar school that 
should be like the other grammar schools and under the 
charge of a master. But where were the scholars to be 
found ? and where were the primary schools to fit scholars 
for it ? West of a line drawn from Carter Street to the 
Franklin School-house there is but one primary school-house 
in all Ward Four, that in the Sherman School-house. Under 
these circumstances, I feel compelled to advise that the 
scholars in the first, and perhaps second, classes be trans- 
ferred to the Edson and Franklin Schools as soon as there 
may be room for them, and the remainder formed into an 
intermediate school. 

With the exception of the Sherman I am able to report 
favorably upon the condition of all the grammar schools. 

Of the old teachers who are well known and suitably 
appreciated by you I need not speak. Of Mr. Burbank, I 
feel it my duty to say that he is an excellent teacher and 
that his school would be a credit to any community. He 
has the confidence of the parents of his scholars, as well as 
of his teachers, and is universally respected as a man as well 
as a teacher. Mr. Fisk of the Green and Mr. Bacheller of 
the Colburn have improved upon last year's experience and 
are doing well. Miss Gallagher of the Mann School has 



26 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 

had a very prosperous year. The salaries paid to all the 
teachers in the building are honestly earned. The patrons 
of the school are to be congratulated upon their good 
fortune in having such a corps of teachers. 

The Moody School is badly accommodated for yard 
room, and the scholars resort to the streets at recess. It 
ought not to be endured much longer. A member of the 
city council says that the ward can furnish twenty men that 
would make good mayors. Will one of them look at the 
yards and out-houses belonging to the Moody School-house ? 

The Varnum School has never contained as many 
scholars as during the last term. From the census of school 
children, taken in May, it appears that there were two hun- 
dred and twenty more children in Ward Two than in any 
previous year. Only sixteen of this number were in newly 
annexed territory. By next summer another school-room 
will be needed in Centralville. On Fourth Street, there is a 
room now occupied by the fire department which may be 
used for that purpose. I commend this matter to your at- 
tention. 

Judging by the past, there will be as large a number of 
applicants for admission to the High School next July as last. 
A great pressure will be brought to bear upon the Committee 
to admit the largest number possible, at least, enough to fill 
every seat in the building. When prosperous times return, 
the population will increase and with it the demand for 
school privileges. The High School building is already too 
small for the school. What remedy shall be applied ? 
Adding another year to the grammar school course will not 
answer the purpose unless additional rooms are provided in 
them for the advanced classes. I make, therefore, the fol- 
lowing suggestions : Enlarge the present High School 
building by adding a wing on the Anne Street side ; or, call 
upon the city council to erect a building on the Kirk Street 



SUPEPJNTENDENT'S REPORT. 



27 



lot purchased for primary and art school purposes, and 
arrange for accommodations there; or, establish a school 
intermediate between the Grammar and High School ; or, 
finally, erect another High School building in Ward Four, 
somewhere near the residence of the late Sidney Spalding, 
and establish there a High and Normal School for girls, 
leaving the old building to the boys exclusively. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 



Mr. Frank T. Benner served as assistant teacher in the 
school until Mr. Chase resumed his duties in April. Mr. 
Benner was a very successful teacher, and highly esteemed 
by both scholars and teachers. 

The services of the special teacher of the French lan- 
guage were dispensed with in July. His residing in New* 
ton rendered it impossible for him to be constant in his 
attendance on his classes. 

The school closed the work of the year on the evening 
of July 3rd, with the usual exhibition by the graduating 
class in Huntington Hall. The attendance was much larger 
than at any previous graduating exercises. The school ap- 
peared to appreciate the honor, and every exercise was 
creditable alike to scholar and to teacher. 

Diplomas were presented by the superintendent to the 
following graduates : 

FOUR TEAKS' COURSE. 



William Alonzo Burch, 
Frank Albert Christie, 
James Joseph Foley, 
James Arthur Gage, 
Harry Varney Huse, 
Walter Moody Lancaster, 
Theodore Edson Parker, Jr., 
Nellie Boardman Abbott, 
Bertha Augusta Baron, 
Martha Bradford Bartlett, 



Belle Frances Batchelder, 
Ettie Marie Carll, 
Frances Mary Dennett, 
Mary Catherine Eno, 
Alice French, 
Agnes Gordon, 
Elizabeth Harris Stevens, 
Lizzie Sarah Swan, 
Ida Belle Taylor, 
Mary Isabelle A. Tibbetts. 



28 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 

THREE TEAKS' COURSE. 

Albion Sager Ashworth, Walter Robie Willey, 

Henry Eugene Bean, Hattie Vivia Ames, 

James Henry Carmichael, / Martha Hanford Baron, 

Frederic Cameron Church, \f Esmarelda Brooks, 

James Henry Connor, * Hattie Anna Carle, 

Willard Bloss Goddard, ; • Ella Cyrene Green, 

Fred Russell Going, \y Eva Maria Hardy, 

Alanson Gray, Alice Hilton, 

William Bradford Goodwin, Rose Anna Jordan, 

Theodore Henry H. Peabody, Henrietta Melissa Ramsdell, 

Henry Ambrose Plimpton, Lucy Larcom Spalding, 

Joseph Lawrence Pinder, Nellie Grace Taylor, 

Fred Arthur Richardson, Julia Maria Wilson. 
Thomas Joseph Sparks, 

The Carney Medals were presented by Geo. F. Lawton, 
Esq., to 

Fred G. Daly, Addie L. Gibson, 

Willard B. Goddard, Lucy L. Spalding, 

Walter M. Lancaster, Rose A. Jordan. 

Honorable mention was made of Edwin E. Chase., 
Gerard Bement and Louise J. McCoy. 

At the examination of applicants for admission to the 
school there were present one hundred and eighty-three 
candidates from the grammar schools. One hundred and 
twenty-three of them were admitted on the standard of last 
year. The number belonging to the school at the close of 
the term being two hundred and sixteen, exclusive of the 
graduates, it was deemed necessary to add to the seating 
accommodations. This was done by fitting up two rooms 
in the hall. They contain forty seats each. The east room 
in the lower story was made into a recitation room for the 
large classes in mathematics under the instruction of Mr. 
Russell. The number of seats in the building is three 
hundred and twenty-seven. The principal of the High 
School thinks that these will suffice for all scholars who 



SUPERINTENDENT'S EEPOET. 29 

shall really be fitted for the High School for several years to 
come. 

In consequence of dispensing with a special instructor 
of French, two additional female teachers have been elected 
to supply his place and to meet the increased demands for 
instruction occasioned by the increased number of inhabi- 
tants in our city. Of these teachers, Miss Julia S. Bennett 
is a graduate of Vassar College, and Miss Helen L. Ham, of 
the Salem Normal School. Both are graduates from our 
own High School and recipients of Carney Medals. They 
come highly recommended for scholarship and ability. To 
Miss Bennett has been assigned a portion of the classes in 
mathematics, and to Miss Ham all the classes in French. 

In answer to certain inquiries made of him, the princi- 
pal of the school, Mr. Chase, replied as follows : " How to 
meet the increasing demands of Harvard University, in its 
requisitions for admission, has become in all High Schools, 
a somewhat serious question. This institution now numbers 
in its academical department nearly eight hundred students, 
and is in such a commanding position that it can dictate its 
own terms, and raise at pleasure its standard of scholarship, 
regardless of the loss in numbers of those who may seek 
admission. The candidate is now examined, in writing, 
through three entire days and upon sixteen different branches 
of study. In addition to the requisitions of most colleges, 
he must be qualified also in Physical Science, French or 
German, English Composition (to be written on the spot, 
including punctuation, &c), Modern Geography, Physical 
Geography, Ancient History, Ancient Geography, the 
Metric System, Logarithms, and a large amount of Greek 
and Latin not generally required in other colleges. To 
meet these demands in many, perhaps most, large High 
Schools, a special male classical teacher, corresponding with 



30 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 

the teachers of science and of mathematics in our own High 
School, has been employed. 

" The principal of our High School, who has for several 
years past instructed the 'college boys,' is not able, to- 
gether with his other duties, to assume the labor of fitting 
scholars for Harvard in these special studies ; and to meet 
the emergency the School Committee have assigned these 
special duties to Miss Webster, who, of the lady teachers, 
has been longest connected with the school, and whose 
ability and experience render her well qualified for the task. 
It is believed that by putting boys who design to enter 
Harvard University upon the studies indicated above, as 
soon as they enter the High School, and demanding of 
them to proceed more rapidly than other classical scholars, 
our course of four years will be sufficient to fit them for an 
honorable admission to this institution." 

During the summer vacation a small laboratory was 
constructed in the basement of the High School adapted to 
accommodate classes engaged in the actual work of chemical 
analysis. The class of young men pursuing this study, in 
the autumn and winter terms, under the charge of Mr. Lord, 
has engaged in the work of the practical chemist with un- 
flagging enthusiasm, and it is now proposed to form a class 
of young ladies, also, in this interesting study. The labor- 
atory, however, is scarcely half large enough to accommo- 
date all the scholars who desire to avail themselves of its 
privileges. 

Notwithstanding the increase in the number of teachers 
in the High School, there are thirty scholars to a teacher, a 
number sufficiently large when the great amount of labor 
consequent upon frequent examinations and reviews is con- 
sidered ; and we believe no High School possesses a more 
laborious and faithful corps of teachers. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 31 

A rule was adopted in July not to admit any appli- 
cants hereafter who failed to answer fifty per cent, of 
the questions on any paper. Should this rule be strictly 
adhered to, the number admitted will be less than at 
former examinations, or the successful candidates will be 
much better qualified. 

CHANGES IN THE SCHOOLS. 

BESIOHSTED. 

Mary C. Gardner, assistant Bartlett School, 
Olive W. Beane, assistant Edson School, 
Emma L. Pevey, assistant Green School, 
Cornelia Davis, teacher Sherman School, 
Elizabeth A. Stearns, teacher Primary No. 5, 
Mary J. Rice, teacher Primary No. 1, 
Ella S. Stanwood, teacher Primary No. 55. 

TEAISTSFEBEED. 

Martha S. Williams, from Primary No. 9 to Primary No. 7. 



Edith A. Gove, assistant Bartlett School, 
*Mary A. Hammill, assistant Colburn School, 
Josephine A. Panlint, assistant Edson School, 
*Maria W. Roberts, assistant Yarnum School, 
Ellen A. Stillings, teacher Primary No. 5, 
Nellie S. Danforth, teacher Primary No. 55. 

ATTENDANCE. 

The average number of scholars attending school this 
year is eighty-four larger than last year, and four hundred 
and forty-eight larger than the year before. The per cent, 
of attendance in some of the schools is surprisingly large ; 
at Nos. 36 and 38 for instance, which was last year eighty- 
five and ninety-three per cent., this year, the teachers 
report an attendance of ninety-six and ninety-five per cent. 

* New departments. 



32 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 

Six other primaries report an attendance of ninety-four per 
cent, and over. The per cent, of attendance generally is a 
little higher than last year. 

From the Truant Officers I have received the following 
Report : 

The whole number of cases investigated and recorded by us for 
the year was one thousand four hundred and fifty-six, of whom one 
hundred and forty were found to be truants, forty-three were new 
scholars, and one thousand two hundred and seventy-three were ab- 
sentees. Of the truants forty-seven were arrested, and thirty of them 
were sentenced to the House of Enrployment and Reformation for 
this city for terms varying from three months to two years, and seven- 
teen were bailed and returned to school on probation. Included in 
the forty-seven arrested as truants are ten who at the time of their 
arrest were not members of any school in the city, but were children 
under sixteen years of age, who were found spending their time on 
the streets and not engaged in any lawful occupation. The new 
scholars were those who had never before been members of any 
school in this city. Of those put down as absentees one hundred and 
twenty-four were found employed in the different manufacturing 
establishments in the city. These with the exception of thirty-two 
were returned to school. The name, age, residence and where em- 
ployed, of the thirty -two not so returned, as also the reason for not 
returning them, will be found on a schedule marked " A" herewith 
submitted. The reasons given us for the absence of children are 
various : Such as sickness, poor clothes, bad shoes, to mind house, to 
go errands, &c. But we think much of it is owing to the fact that 
the parents of these children do not use their best endeavors to have 
them constant ; ninety-four of this class we have called upon the 
second, and thirty-one the third time, in our endeavors to have them 
more constant. 

The extension of the city limits has increased our duties materi- 
ally, especially in the amount of travel. The taking the census of 
the school children and recording them alphabetically has also occu- 
pied a good deal of our time. And the strike of the operatives in 
the mills, by letting loose upon our streets a large number of chil- 
dren of school-age — quite a number of whom we succeeded in getting 
into school — have all tended to make our duties more arduous. But 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 33 

on the whole we congratulate ourselves with the belief that the at- 
tendance, under the circumstances, has been good. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Whole number of cases investigated, 1456 

Absentees, . . . 1273 

Truants, 140 

New scholars, 43 

Misdemeanors investigated, 16 

Returned to school second time, 94 

Returned to school third time, 31 

Arrested, 47 

Truants, 37 

Wanderers, 10 

Sentenced, 30 

Bailed and returned to school, 17 

Signed, JESSE HUSE, 

BICKFORD LANG, * 

Truant Officers of Lowell. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

By section Seven, chapter One, of the Rules, the Com- 
mittee on Teachers are required to examine annually in the 
month of February, and at such other times as the Board 
may direct, applicants for schools who are over eighteen 
years of age, and recommend to the Board suitable persons 
to receive certificates. 

At the examination held this year, sixty applicants 
appeared, nine of whom were excused from the examina- 
tion, as they were at the time serving as substitutes in the 
public schools. Subsequently, five others were examined 
who were unable to be present in February. Certificates of 
qualifications to teach were granted to fifty-six of these 
applicants, the names of forty-seven of whom, in the order 
of the rank attained, with the age, experience, place of 
education and residence, form the " List of approved can- 
didates for situations as teachers," for the year ending 
February, 1876. Twenty-four of these candidates received 



34 SUPERINTENDENT'S EEPOET. 

certificates last year. Six of these only have been elected 
to schools (three of whom were substitutes as mentioned 
above), and four are now serving as temporary teachers. 
On inspection of the list we find in the column headed 
" Educated at " Salem Normal School at the head, at the 
foot, and at intervals between. Among the sixteen who 
attained the highest rank, ten are graduates of that school. 
It is fair to suppose that the others who hailed from the 
school are not graduates. 

On further inspection, we find that perfect rank is 120 ; 
that the highest rank attained was 114.45, and the lowest, 
86.10 ; that twenty had had no experience in teaching, 
nine others, experience in the evening schools only, that the 
rest -had had experience of from six weeks to ten years, and 
that all but two reside in Lowell, and all but nine have at- 
tended one or more of the Lowell schools. From the list 
nothing can be learned of those qualifications which are 
absolute requisites for success in the school-room. 

The sub-committee, with whom is the appointing power, 
is left to follow the dictates of his own judgment, and how- 
ever pure his motives are, he may, with no other helps than 
what the printed list and a slight acquaintance with a few 
candidates afford, make, innocently, an appointment not 
only unsuitable, but unjust to the claims of others who have 
spent time and money, and taken great pains, to prepare 
themselves for the business of teaching. Appointments are 
made upon no principle by which applicants for schools can 
govern themselves. Graduates from the Normal School at 
Salem point to the fact, that of the seven ladies elected as 
teachers the past year, only one ever attended a normal 
school. There has been no design in all this, but the feeling 
is a strong one among applicants and their friends that there 
should be a system of appointments adopted that will 
relieve them from the necessity of continually importuning 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 35 

members of the committee. I commend this subject to the 
Board. 

DRAWING. 

As a misapprehension exists in the minds of many 
regarding this study in the schools, it may be well to say 
that in the lowest classes in the primary schools it is re- 
garded more as an amusing occupation than a study. In 
the other classes it is an exercise, and in some of the 
schools where special attention is paid to it, great progress is* 
made. With the help of the manual the teachers endeavor to 
pursue a uniform system, and in no case have I heard any 
unfavorable opinion expressed against its being in the course 
of study. 

In the grammar schools the study is taught by Mr* 
Harrison, who is also teacher of penmanship. He visits 
each room at stated intervals and gives what instruction he 
thinks the pupils most need. As there are so many rooms 
to visit the lessons are necessarily short. The upper classes 
have only one lesson in two weeks, the others one a week. 
When we consider that all the lessons are in the writing 
and the drawing books, and that the regular teacher has, 
or ought to have, listened to the teaching of the special 
teacher for several years, and that the manual is at hand, 
we have not to seek far for reasons of dissatisfaction against 
the special teacher. The schools that exhibit the best work 
are those that make the least complaint. At the examina- 
tion of the schools in July many excellent specimens of 
drawing were exhibited, which reflected great credit upon 
both teachers and pupils. 

The Art Schools were conducted through the winter 
upon the plan marked out and reported upon last year. 
The number attending the free-hand class was nearly 



36 SUPEKtNTENDENT'S EEPOKT. 

double that of the previous year, and a marked improve- 
ment was shown in the work done. 

The class under the charge of Mr. Whitaker was quite 
large. He was aided by several able assistants, and all 
aimed to make their teaching practical. Professor Walter 
Smith offered fifty dollars in prizes for the best original 
designs for any goods made in Lowell ; Mr. Howe, directly 
in charge of the advanced class in architecture, and Mr. 
Whitaker, offered prizes amounting to seventy dollars for 
work of various kinds by scholars of the other classes. 

As the local papers gave a full account of the award- 
ing of the prizes at the time, I will not do more than to 
refer to it here. 

The best of the work done in these schools was ex- 
hibited in Horticultural Hall, Boston, and afterwards in 
Huntington Hall, Lowell. I take pleasure in copying 
entire the following from the report of the State Board of 
Examiners : 

" The whole exhibit of the City of Lowell stands out in strong 
prominence. Wfe thought it necessary to express our high apprecia- 
tion of the thoroughness of the instrumental courses by awarding 
the recognition of ' Excellent' to both the architectural and mechan- 
ical sections, and 'Honorable mention' to the free-hand section. 
In the latter, it is gratifying to observe a very decided advance on 
last year's works. Some designs which were offered in competition 
for prizes, for goods capable of being manufactured in Lowell, were 
highly creditable as being work in the right direction, if not all that 
could be desired in quality of color. 

" The Committee are convinced that such systems of instruction 
as appear most conspicuously perhaps in the Lowell school, viz : the 
logical training of the hand and eye by copying from good examples, 
the familiarizing the mind to observation and analysis by the devel- 
opment of correct and grammatical detail, are better fitted to accom- 
plish the legitimate and practical objects of such schools, than the 
flattery of the pupils into an exaggerated confidence in their capacity 
and resources by encouraging the production of original works." 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



37 



The following table gives an exhibit of the awards of 
the Board of Examiners to the Lowell schools : 



I. Tan Tassel, 


Flat copy. 


Honorable mention (for set). 


Architectural. 


L. T. Moody, . . 


do. 


do. 


do. 


F. E. Foster, . . 


do. 


do. 


do. 


G. L. Mansfield, . 


do. 


Excellent (for set). 


Machine drawing. 


Geo. D. Corey, . 


do. 


Honorable mention (for set). 


do. 


Frank Lord, . . 


Object. 


Excellent. 


Free-hand. 


H. J. Leavitt, . . 


do. 


Honorable mention. 


do. 


John Riney, . . 


Flat copy. 


do. 


do. 


Ella C. Green, . 


Original. 


do. 


do. 


Helen Whittier, . 


do. 


do. 


Free-hand, design 


Helen Whittier, . 


do. 


Excellent. 


do. 


Mrs. Rhodes, . . 


do. 


do. 


do. 


Mary E. Hardman, 


do. 


do. 


do. 



Also for the full display of Architectural Drawings, Excellent. 
Also for the full display of Mechanical Drawings, Excellent. 
Also for the Free-hand display, Honorable mention. 



The expenditures on account of the Drawing Schools 
for the winter of 1875-6, were as follows : 



To sundry persons, labor and materials, 

To sundry persons, advertising, printing and posting bills, . 

Lowell Gas Light Company, gas, 

Janitor, 

Bertram Harrison, services teacher free-hand classes, and for sundries, 
Isabella Coburn, assistant in free-hand department, .... 
Helen W. Wright, assistant in free-hand department, .... 
Channing Whitaker, services as teacher of machine and architectural 

department, 

Channing Whitaker, cash paid assistants, and for diagrams, . 



$ 39.11 
60.75 

150.48 
85.75 

628.30 
74.00 

212.00 

790.00 
1,299.79 



Total, 



$3,340.18 

CHARLES MORRILL, 

Superintendent of Public Schools. 



Evening Schools. 



The Free Evening Schools for the winter of 1874-5 were opened 
November 5, 1874, and closed March 2, 1875, having continued sixty- 
four evenings. They were held in the same apartments as in the 
previous year as follows : 

In Howard Mission Chapel, Centralville, under charge of Miss 
Ida Wilson and seven assistants ; in the Ward Room, Church Street, 
under charge of Mrs. J. B. Bradt and eight assistants ; in the Hall of 
Primary School-house, High Street, under charge of Mrs. H. G. 
Crosby and three assistants ; in the basement of Green School-house 
under charge of Misses Sheldon, Robbins and Hill, and twenty-two 
assistants ; and in the vestry of Zion's Primitive Methodist Chapel } 
Gorham Street, under -charge of Miss Fanny M. Talbot and thirteen 
assistants. 

Each of these schools has been under the direct personal super- 
vision of some one member of this Committee, who had been assigned 
to its charge, and he has had a constant care that the best means of 
promoting its efficiency might be adopted. 

These schools were established mainly for the benefit of those 
who in early life have not had an opportunity to obtain a rudimen- 
tary education, and who are now debarred by their age or circum- 
stances from attending the public day schools. 

The attendance upon these schools for the term we now report 
— the winter of 1874-5 — was greatly in excess of the previous year 
the whole number having been one thousand seven hundred and 
eighty-seven against one thousand three hundred and fifty-eight, and 
the average attendance five hundred and ninety-five against four 
hundred and ninety-nine for the term of 1873-4. 

This statement of the very low average attendance compared 
with the full membership, being but a fraction more than thirty-three 
per cent., will doubtless surprise those who have not given any 



40 EEPOKT ON EVENING SCHOOLS. 

special attention to this educational interest, and here will be found 
one of the most fruitful reasons why the expenses per scholar are so 
large : Very often, for successive evenings, some of the classes will 
be very small, and then for a while they will be overflowing. Conse- 
quently, to give efficiency to the schools, the average number of 
scholars taught by each teacher is necessarily less than would be the 
case if there was greater regularity in the attendance. 

The expenses per scholar for the whole membership for the term 
was but $2.69, while the cost per scholar for sixty-four evenings, 
based on the average attendance, was $8.07 against $3.40 and $9.25 
for corresponding items for the previous year. 

While this great disparity exists between the full membership 
and the average attendance of the schools, it will be readily under- 
stood that the results attained cannot be so satisfactory as could be 
desired, and your Committee, while realizing the great value of these 
schools to those who attend constantly and avail themselves of 
the inestimable advantages they afford, cannot overlook the fact 
that to those who are irregular and inattentive, as very many are, 
very little benefit is gained for the time and money spent in their 
education. 

There has been considerable improvement in discipline since 
four years ago, when it was necessary to have one or more police 
officers at each of these schools to preserve order. It is hoped that 
soon such helps may be prudently wholly dispensed with, as has 
already been done in part. 

Still another source of difficulty tending toward making these 
schools less efficient than they ought for the expenditures made upon 
them is the unsuitable accommodations provided for them. We 
trust the time will come when permanent accommodations for all of 
the Evening Schools, as is now done to a small extent, will be pro- 
vided ; and when this is accomplished, a very marked improvement 
will readily be attained. In the mean time they should receive the 
nurturing care of the School Board, for there is a germ here which 
if properly encouraged and cultivated will yet bear goodly fruit in 
the elevation of our people and the maintenance of our institutions. 

Annexed is a tabular statement showing the attendance and the 
details of the cost of maintaining those schools for the winter term 
of 1874-5, from which it appears that the average cost for instruc- 
tion per scholar tor actual attendance was nine and fifty-seven one 
hundredths cents (9^^) per evening against ten and twenty-two one 
hundredths cents (10 T 2 D %) for the previous year ; and all other ex- 



REPORT ON" EVENING SCHOOLS. 



41 



penses three and nineteen one hundredths cents (.3-^) against four 
and seventy-one one hundredths cents (4 T Vo) last year; making a 
total of twelve and seventy-six one hundredths cents {12^%) per 
evening for each scholar against fourteen and ninety-three one hund- 
redths cents (14 T 9 o 3 o), and a total expense, as before stated, of eight 
dollars and seven cents ($8.07) for each scholar in attendance for the 
full term of sixty-four evenings against nine dollars and twenty-five 
cents ($9.25) for the previous year. 

This Report is not intended to cover the workings of the schools 
for the present winter of 1875-6, but we may say, that the present 
attendance is very large— beyond the proper capacity of the school- 
rooms. The schools are well organized, and we are hoping the 
results will show that improvements are still being made. Certainly 
we shall be disappointed if the reports, when made up for the winter's 
operations, do not show more satisfactory advance than for any pre- 
vious year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. H. LATHAM, 
J. G. PEABODY, 
WM. G. WARD, 
JOHN W. SMITH, 
E. B. PATCH, 
Lowell, Dec. 27, 1875. Committee on Evening Schools. 

SUMMARY. 



LOCATION OF SCHOOL. 


H 
6 


'Hi 
> 


No. of 

D iff 'nt Scholars. 


Average 
Attendance. 


§ a 

K ^ ^ 




Male. 


Fem. 


Total. 


Male. 


Fern. 


Total. 


Ao 3 


Mission School-house, First St., Cen., 
Ward Room, Church Street, . . . 
Hall Primary School-house, High St., 
Basement Green School-house, . . 
Zion Prim. M. Yestry, Gorham St., . 


8 

9 

4 

25 

14 


64 

62 
64 
63 
64 


84 
249 

445 

292 


89 

109 

411 
108 


173 
249 
109 

856 
400 


35 

98 

142 
102 


39 
40 

98 
41 


74 

98 

40 

240 

143 


.109 

.088 
.087 
.095 
.097 


Total, 1874-5, 

Total, 1S73-4, 


60 

55 


64 
62 


1070 
839 


717 
519 


1787 
1358 


377 
309 


218 
190 


595 
499 





Increase, 


5 


2 


231 


198 


429 


68 


28 


96 









42 



EEPOKT ON EVENING SCHOOLS. 



on Church Street, 



EXPENDITURES. 

Eent of Zion Primitive Methodist Vestry, including heating, light and 

janitor, 

Eent of Howard Mission Chapel, 

Fuel for Howard Mission Chapel and Ward Eoom 

Heating Green School-room (estimated), 

Heating High Street Hall (estimated), 

Gas, Howard Mission Chapel, . 

Ward Eoom, Church Street, . 

High Street Hall, 

Green School-rooms, 



Ellis patent gas burners, High Street, 
Four bracket lamps, .... 
Janitors, Howard Mission Chapel, . 

Ward Eoom, Church Street, 

High Street Hall, 

Green School-rooms, . 

Zion Primitive Methodist Vestry, 



Police, 

Advertising, printing and posting, . 

Books and stationery, 

Paid to teachers, Howard Mission Chapel, 

Ward Eoom, Church Street, 

High Street Hall, . 

Green School-rooms, . 

Zion Primitive Methodist Vestry, 

Sundries, 

Total, . . „ . 



$16.16 
33.82 
28.59 
98.44 



$48.00 
41.25 
48.00 

125.75 
35.00 



$ 519.00 
533.50 

223.75, 

1,442.25 

884.25 



200.00 
15.45 
23.81 
50.00 
10.00 



177.61 

18.50 

5.00 



304.00 

131.08 

28.55 

232.36 



- 3,602.75 
6.85 

$4,805.91 



Report on Music. 



The Committee on Music beg leave to present the following 
tReport of this branch of education in the public schools, for the past 
year : 

The number of pupils, whose musical instruction has been under 
the general charge of the teacher of music, is five thousand four 
hundred and forty-six (5,446), arranged into one hundred and fifteen 
(115) classes, taught by one hundred and thirteen (113) of the regular 
teachers in the High, Grammar and Primary Schools. 

The pupils are now given a thorough and systematic course of 
musical instruction, beginning with the children of five years of age 
when they enter the primary schools, and ending with the upper 
class of pupils in the High School. 

In the Primary School they are first taught to imitate the sounds 
as given by the teacher, then songs of the most simple and easy kind 
are learned by rote. The cultivation of the voice, at this early stage, 
is given its proper attention, by the pupils being taught to sing 
smoothly, and to avoid a harsh and noisy tone ; then follow simple 
forms of musical notation, intermingled with practical exercises upon 
the sounds of the first five and six tones of the scale, and so well 
trained does the ear become with these exercises, that young children 
will go to the black-board and write the scale-name of any of these 
tones, as given by the voice of the instructor, or the musical instru- 
ment used in connection with the lesson. Many of these young 
pupils have, in this way, written from twenty to thirty of these tones 
upon the board, without a mistake. 

They are also taught the different kinds of notes and rests, the 
staff, and the manner of beating double, triple, quadruple and sextuple 
measures. 

The " First Series of Music Charts " are in daily use in these 
schools, and have proved to be a valuable aid, both to teacher and 



44 EEPORT OaS" MUSIC. 

pupil, and shown the wisdom of our predecessors in thus providing 
this valuable aid in musical instruction — giving a uniformity to the 
lessons and teachings, which, before their introduction, was sadly 
needed. 

The pupils are all supplied with the " First Music Reader," which, 
also, has proved to be very valuable in producing similar results as 
have the Charts. The lesson for practice is first given by the teacher 
of music, and is then left for the teacher of the class to practise daily 
with the jmpils until learned. It is then recited to the teacher of 
music at his next visit, receiving such suggestions, criticisms, and 
commendations as may be deemed proper. The regular teachers 
have, so far as we have noticed, manifested a commendable disposi- 
tion to teach and train their pupils in this branch of education, with 
an earnest desire to cooperate with the teacher of music, and although 
many of them cannot themselves sing, yet having an "aptness to 
teach," coupled with a desire for the success of this most useful 
branch of education, their efforts have been productive of the best 
results. For their kindly cooperation we desire to thank them, one 
and all, and earnestly hope that the same may be continued in the 
future. 

During the past year, at the suggestion of the Committee on 
Music, the teacher of music met the teachers of the schools, on the 
first Wednesday of each month, and gave then a " talk " or lesson 
in music, at which several classes of pupils were present to show the 
results of their training in this department. These meetings, we 
believe, have been productive of much good to all who have availed 
themselves of them, and we trust will be continued. 

The teacher of music is required to devote the entire time of 
each school session in the discharge of his duties, and so perfectly 
has he arranged his lessons, that only eleven minutes of school-time, 
each day, are taken in travelling to the several schools. The other 
travel is before and after school, and at recess time. 

The expense of teaching in the musical department is about 
thirty-six cents per year for each pupil, or less than one cent per week 
for each — an insignificant sum in comparison with the beneficial 
results produced. 

We are, finally, happy to report a decided progress in all the 
schools — High, Grammar and Primary — during the past year, there 
being a more general and comprehensive knowledge of the practice 
and theory of vocal music, than in any previous year. 



REPORT ON MUSIC. 45 

Before closing our Report we desire to call attention to the con- 
tinued success of the annual examination of music, held in Hunting- 
ton Hall. This year the* attendance nipon the same was largely- 
increased over previous years, and all who were present were amply 
repaid, in witnessing the splendid results shown by Mr. Willey, our 
excellent teacher of music. The exhibition, in the evening, by the 
pupils of the High and Grammar Schools, still maintained its high 
position of former years, and was fully enjoyed by the large and ap- 
preciative audience gathered on that occasion. 

That the city may long be blessed in this department with the 
excellent services of Mr. Willey, and this study receive the fostering 
care of our successors in office, is the best wish we can offer in closing 
this Report. 

A. A. HAGGETT, 
WM. G. WARD, 
GEO. E. PINKHAM, 
C. H. LATHAM. 
Lowell, Dec. 27, 1875. Committee on Music. 



APPENDIX. 



A. 

SALARIES OF TEACHERS, BILLS, &c. 

Section 1. The salaries of teachers for each school-year are established 
as follows: 



HIGH SCHOOL, 

Principal, 

First male assistant, 

Second male assistant, . 

First female assistant, 

Other female assistants, first year, 
" " " second year, 

" " " after second year, 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

Principal (males), 

" of the Mann School (female), 
Assistants, first year, 

" . second year, . 
third year, . 

" after third year, 

Teacher of penmanship, 
Teacher in vocal music, . 



$2,500.00 
2,000.00 
1,700.00 
850.00 
650.00 
700.00 
750.00 



$1,700.00 

1,000.00 

400.00 

450.00 

500.00 

600.00 

1,500.00 

1,700.00 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 



Teachers, first year, 

" second year, . 

" third year, 

" after third year, 



TEMPORARY TEACHERS 



Male teachers, for every school-day's service, 
Female teachers in High School, for every school-day's service, , 
Female teachers in other schools, for every school-day's service, 
And after three months' continuous service, .... 



$400.00 
450.00 
500.00 
600.00 



$3.00 
1.75 
1.00 
1.25 



48 APPENDIX. 



B. 

TEXT-BOOKS USED IN THE PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

Hillard's Third Reader; Hillard's Second Reader; Hillard's Primer ; Wal- 
ton's Primary Arithmetic; Smith's Drawing Cards. 

TEXT-BOOKS USED IN THE GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

Greenleaf's and Eaton's Common School Arithmetics; Greene's Grammar; 
Guyot's Elementary Geography; Guyot's Intermediate Geography; Anderson's 
Grammar School History of the United States; Hillard's Franklin Fifth Reader; 
Hillard's Intermediate Reader ; Hillard's Third Reader; Worcester's Pronounc- 
ing Speller; Colburn's First Lessons in Arithmetic; Payson, Dunton & Scrib- 
ner's Writing Books; Smith's Drawing Books; Hooker's Child's Book of 
Nature permitted as a reading book. 

TEXT-BOOKS USED IN THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

Harkness' Latin Grammar; Harkness' Latin Reader; Harkness' Latin Com- 
position; Harkness' Caesar; Frieze's Virgil; Andrews' Latin Lexicon; Good- 
win's Greek Grammar; Goodwin's Greek Reader; Boise's Homer; Liddell & 
Scott's Greek Lexicon; Eaton's Arithmetic; Eaton's Algebra; Davies' Legen- 
dre's Geometry; Davies' Legendre's Trigonometry; Davies' Surveying; Magill's 
French Grammar; Fasquelle's French Course; College Plays, by Bocher; 
Spier's French Dictionary; Berard's History of England; Pennell's Ancient 
Greece; Swinton's Outlines of History; Martin's Civil Government; Greene's 
English Grammar; Hart's Composition and Rhetoric; Underwood's Hand- 
book of English Literature; Alden's Science of Government; AVinslow's Intel- 
lectual Philosophy; Wayland's Moral Science; Hooker's Natural History; 
Quackenbos' Natural Philosophy; Steele's Chemistry; Kiddle's Astronomy; 
Tenney's Geology; Wood's Botany; Dalton's Physiology; Warren's Physical 
Geography; Mitchell's Ancient Geography; Fourth Music Reader; Webster's 
and Worcester's Dictionaries; Otto's German Grammar and Reader. 



c. 

COURSE OF STUDY FOR THE PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Sixth Class — * First Reader to page 30. Commence by using letter and 
word cards, and Hillard's Reading Charts, Nos. 1, 2, 8 and 4. 
Spell the words in columns, by letters and by sounds. 

* Leigh's Sound Charts, and Pronouncing edition of Hillard's Primer and Second Reader are 
recommended for the Sixth and Fifth Classes. 



APPENDIX. 49 



Develop the idea of number to ten, by the use of objects. Count to one 
hundred on the numeral frame. 

Teach the construction of letters and figures critically, using slate and 
blackboard. 

Fifth Class— First Reader completed. Spell as in Sixth Class, using Charts 
Nos. 2, 5, 6, 7 and 8. 

Teach Roman numerals to L. 

Print words and figures. 

Add and subtract small numbers, using the numeral frame. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Fourth Class — Second Reader, to Page 57. Practice " Enunciation Exer- 
cises " daily. 

Spell, by letters and by sounds, words in columns and in reading lessons. 
Teach the simplest form of script letters. 
Teach Arithmetic orally, to page 20. 

Third Class — Second Reader completed, and Third Reader commenced. 
Practice "Enunciation Exercises" as in the Fourth Class. Table of numbers 
on page 11, and marks used in printing on page 12, to be learned. 

Teach the simplest form of script letters. 

Teach Arithmetic to page 40, and the Multiplication Table to 6 x 6. 

THIED YEAR. 

Second Class — Third Reader to page 57. Daily practice of exercises in 
enunciation to " Terminal Combinations." Spell words in columns and in 
reading lessons, by letters and by sounds. Teach the meaning of the words 
found in the reading lessons, and require scholars to use their own language in 
defining. Correct all faults in expression. 

Teach all the script letters, and require short words to be written from 
dictation. 

Review the Arithmetic and go to page 61. 

First Class — Third Reader, to page 125. Exercises in enunciation, spelling, 
definitions, &c, as in second class. 

Write three words of each spelling lesson, and criticise carefully the form 
of each letter; also, encourage the writing of short sentences. 

Review and complete the Arithmetic, omitting from the 74th to the 87th 
page, inclusive. 

Drawing should be taught in all the classes except the sixth. 

In each school a few minutes should be devoted, at every session, to singin°- 
physical exercises, lessons on objects, and repeating verses and maxims. 



50 APPENDIX. 



D. 
COURSE OF STUDY FOR THE GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

FIRST YEAE. 

Eighth Class — Hillard's Third Reader. Especial attention should be given 
to the Introductory Exercises, and to the lessons in Spelling and Defining at the 
beginning of each reading lesson. 

Worcester's Pronouncing Speller to page 50. 

Guyot's Elementary Geography commenced; oral teaching of Geography 
from wall maps. 

Colburn's First Lessons in Arithmetic to sec. 4, page 63, omitting the last 
52 questions in sec. 3, C. 

Written Arithmetic, from dictation, Numeration and Notation, Addition 
and Multiplication ; amounts not to exceed a million. 

Seventh Class — Hillard's Intermediate Header; Introductory Exercises, 
Spelling and Defining as in eighth class. 

Worcester's Pronouncing Speller to page 60. 

Guyot's Elementary Geography continued. 

Colburn's First Lessons, sections 4, 5 and 6, and 50 questions in sec. 3, C. 

Written Arithmetic, from dictation, Numeration and Notation, Addition 
and Multiplication, Subtraction and Long Division, not to exceed three periods. 
In Subtraction not more than two figures in the minuend to be less than the 
figures below them, and in Division the divisor not to exceed 25. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Sixth Class — Hillard's Intermediate Reader,* Spelling and Defining, and 
Introductory Exercises, as far as Inflection. 

Worcester's Pronouncing Speller, from page 60 to 78. 

Guyot's Intermediate Geography, from South America to Africa, and Exact 
Geographical Position on pages 85, 86 and 87. 

Colburn's First Lessons, from C, in sec. 6, to sec. 9, page 94, with 70 ques- 
tions in C, sec. 3. 

Eaton's Common School Arithmetic to Reduction, omitting Numeration 
and Notation of Numbers above units of billions, and Numeration and Nota- 
tion after the English method. 

Fifth Class — Hillard's Intermediate Reader* continued to page 32, with daily 
drill on the Introductory Exercises. 

Worcester's Pronouncing Speller, from page 78 to page 95. 

Guyot's Intermediate Geography, Africa, Australia and Asia, to page 43, 
with review as needed. 

Colburn's First Lessons, sections 9, 10 and 11, and C, sec. 3. 

Eaton's Common School Arithmetic to Common Fractions. 

* Child's Book of Nature permitted as a reading book to alternate with the Intermediate 
Reader, in the Sixth, Fifth, Fourth and Third Classes. 



APPENDIX. 51 



THIRD TEAR, 

Fourth Class — Hillard' s Intermediate Reader* continued. Daily drill as in 
Fifth Class. 

Worcester's Pronouncing Speller from page 95 to page 120; oral and written 
exercises. 

Guyot's Intermediate Geography, Europe and United States to page 57, and 
Exact Geographical Position on pages 85, 86 and 87. 

Colburn's First Lessons, sections 12, 13, 14 and C, sec. 3. 

Greenleaf's Common School Arithmetic, from Properties of Numbers, page 
130, to page 165, and review of Miscellaneous Questions on page 119, or Eaton's 
from Common to Decimal Fractions. 

Greene's Introduction to the Study of English Grammar, to Part II, page 
54. 

Third Glass — Hillard' s Intermediate Reader* completed and thoroughly 
reviewed. 

Worcester's Pronouncing Speller, from page 120 to page 131; oral and 
written exercises. 

Guyot' s Intermediate Geography, from page 57 to page 71 ; review preceding 
maps, and Exact Geographical Position. 

Colburn's First Lessons, B and C, sec. 4; A and B, sec. 7; miscellaneous 
examples in sections 6, 11 and 12, and review sec. 14. 

Greenleaf's Common School Arithmetic, from page 165 to page 205, omitting 
sections 167, 168, 173 and 174, or Eaton's, from Decimal Fractions to Percent- 
age. 

Greene's Grammar", from Part II, page 54, to Syntax, page 131. 

Anderson's Grammar School History, as a reading book, and to be taught 
"by reading and familiar conversation," to page 53; few dates to be memorized, 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Second Class — Hillard' s Franklin Fifth Reader; systematic teaching of the 
Introductory Treatise, and reading lessons to XLY, page 177. 

Worcester's Pronounch*; Speller, from page 131 to page 137, and review 
select lessons to page 100. 

Guyot's Intermediate Geography completed, and maps of the New England 
and Middle Atlantic States reviewed. 

Colburn's First Lessons, discretionary in reference to sec. 15; review of 
the book as required by the Rules. 

Greenleaf's Common School Arithmetic, from page 165 to page 225, sec. 
224, omitting sections 167, 168, 173, 174, 201 and 202; or Eaton's from Percent- 
age to Ratio, omitting the same as omitted in Greenleaf's. 

Greene's Grammar, from page 131 to the end. 

Anderson's Grammar School History, from the beginning to the close of 
the Revolutionary War, on page 106. 

* Child's Book of Nature permitted as a reading book to alternate with the Intermediate 
Reader, in the Sixth, Fifth, Fourth and Third Classes. 



52 APPENDIX. 



FIFTH YEAR. 

First Class — Hillard's Franklin Fifth Header completed and reviewed. 

Worcester's Pronouncing Speller; the whole book reviewed. 

Guyot's Intermediate Geography thoroughly reviewed; the drawings of 
maps to be rapid as well as accurate. 

Colburn's First Lessons; daily exercises as required by the Rules. 

Greenleaf's or Eaton's Common School Arithmetic finished and reviewed; 
omit Custom-house Business, Assessment of Taxes, Equation of Payments, 
Currencies, Exchange, Duodecimals, Progression, Alligation, Permutation, and 
Mensuration of Solids. 

Greene's Grammar finished and reviewed. 

Anderson's Grammar School History finished and reviewed. 

Composition, Writing, Drawing and Music through the whole course. 

Declamation by the boys in the first and second classes once a month. 



E. 

COURSE OF STUDY FOR THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

ENGLISH COTJKSE. 

Fibst Teak. First Half — Algebra, Mental Arithmetic, Ancient History, 
Natural History. Second Half — Algebra, English History, Natural Philosophy. 

Second Year. First Half— Geometry, Physical Geography, Natural Phi- 
losophy. Second Half — Geometry, Chemistry, English Grammar, English Lit- 
erature. 

Third Year. First Half — Geology, Arithmetic, Physiology. Second Half 
— Astronomy, Political Science, Rhetoric or Botany. 

Fourth Year. (Optional.) First Half— -Intellectual Philosophy, English 
Literature, and either French, German or Latin. Second Half — Botany, Moral 
Philosophy, English Literature, and either French, German or Latin. 

Composition, Declamation, Reading, Drawing and Music through the 
course. French, German, Latin, Trigonometry and Surveying are optional in 
the Three Years' Course. 

CLASSICAL COURSE. 

First Year. First Half — Latin Grammar and Reader, Algebra. Second 
Half— Latin Grammar and Reader, Algebra and Natural Philosophy. 

Second Year. First Half — Caesar, Geometry, Natural Philosophy* 
Second Half — Csesar, Greek Grammar and Reader. 

Third Year. First Half— Virgil, Greek Reader. Second Half— Virgil, 
Greek Reader. 

Fourth Year. First Half— Cicero, Ovid, Homer. Second Half— CicerOj 
Homer, and review of the course. 

Optional Studies. French through the course. Trigonometry and Sur- 
veying in the third year. 



APPENDIX. 53 



F. 

SERIES OF QUESTIONS PROPOSED FOR THE 

EXAMINATION OF APPLICANTS TO 

ENTER THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

QUESTIONS IN HISTORY. 

1. What was the exact extent of the territory granted to the Plymouth Com- 

pany by King James, in 1606 ? 

2. Under what name were the two settlements of Khode Island united in 1644? 

3. What were the chief causes of King Philip's War ? 

4. Where was the " Albemarle County Colony " situated ? The " Clarendon 

County Colony "? 

5. State what you know of William Penn's treaty with the Indians. 

6. Who was sent from England, in 1755, as Commander-in-chief of the royal 

forces, and what expedition did he head ? 

7. What effect did the " surrender of Burgoyne " have in France ? 

8. State what you know of the battle of Saunders' Creek. 

9. What executive departments were created by Congress, the heads of which 

formed Washington's first cabinet ? 

10. What famous duel occurred in 1804 ? What did it grow out of ? How 

did it result ? 

11. For what was the 50th anniversary of American Independence remarkable? 

12. By whom was the bill for the annexation of Texas signed ? 

13. What was the effect of the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska bill ? 

14. Give the names of the three political parties, each of which nominated a 

candidate for the presidency in 1854. 

15. What is a civil war ? 

16. Mention five great battles in the civil war in the United States. 

17. What General commanded the union forces at the battle of Antietam ? 

18. With how large an army did Lee invade Maryland in 1S63 ? And what 

battle was fought on the 1st, 2nd and 3rd of July ? 

19. In what year was slavery declared constitutionally abolished in the United 

States ? 

20. What did the national debt amount to in 1865 ? 

QUESTIONS IN GEOGRAPHY. 

1. State what you know of the Atlantic coast of the United States. 

2. What State lies wholly in the plateau between the Rocky Mountains and 

the Sierra Nevada ? 

3. Into how many groups may the States of the Union be divided? Name 

them. 

4. Locate and describe the position of Lowell. 

5. Name the largest of the rivers composing the Mississippi system. 

6. What are parallels of Latitude, and what is their use ? 

7. What is meant by Longitude ? 

8. What are the most important countries of Western Asia ? 

9. What are the principal countries composing the Malay Peninsula ? 



54 APPENDIX. 



10. Which is the longest river of Asia, and in what direction does it flow? 

11. What can you say of the surface of Africa? 

12. What strait and gulf connect the Red Sea to the Indian Ocean? 

13. What countries surround Bolivia? 

14. What stream flows from the south end of the Rocky Mountains into the 

Gulf of Mexico? 

15. What large river flows into Lake Winnipeg? 

16. What two countries compose the Scandinavian peninsula, and for what 

are they famous? 

17. Where is Switzerland, and for what is it celebrated? 

18. What is the most noted city of southern Europe, and where is it situated? 

19. Name the "Five Great Powers" of Europe. 

20. Draw a map of New England and locate Portland, Boston, Burlington, the 

White Mountains, Providence and Hartford. 

QUESTIONS IN GKAMMAK. 

1. What is meant by objects in Grammar? Give examples. 

2. Write the plural of berry, elf, fife, folio, handful, axis and son-in-laiv. 

3. What does case denote in Grammar? Give an example of each case. 

4. What two uses has a relative pronoun ? Give an example. 

5. In the sentence, " He gave me what books I needed," what part of speech 

is what f 

6. When is that a relative? 

7. In the sentence, " I think that that machine that you examined, will suc- 

ceed," what part of speech is each that ? 

8. What is the conjugation of a verb? 

9. Write the principal parts of the verbs hurt, reply, see, saio, shut, ring and 

wring. 

10. What are modal adverbs? Give examples. 

11. Into what classes are all connectives divided? 

12. Name the four different kinds of sentences, and give an example of each. 

13. What is it to analyze a sentence? 

14. Give an example of a compound sentence ; of a simple sentence ; and of a 

complex sentence. 

15. What is the rule for the use of adverbs ? 

16. Write a sentence containing an irregular transitive verb, in the passive 

voice, potential mode, past perfect tense, first person, singular number. 
17 — 18 — 19. Give the part of speech of each word italicised in the following 
stanza, and its connection with other words : 
Ay, call it holy ground, 

The soil where first they trod ; 
They have left unstained what there they found, 
Freedom to worship God. 

20. Write a composition, five lines in length, upon any subject you please. 

QUESTIONS IN ARITHMETIC. 

1. How do simple numbers differ from compound numbers? 

2. What effect is produced upon a number by moving the decimal point three 

places to the left? 



APPENDIX. 55 



3. Express 7020004.000006 in words. 

4. What is the sum of four thousand, and four thousandths ; one, and one 

billionth ; and seven hundred seventy thousand and seven, and seven- 
teen hundred-thousandths? 

5. From one million and one millionth, take nine hundred ninety-nine thou- 

sand, and nine hundred ninety-nine thousandths. 

6. Multiply .4 by 8000, and prove your answer. 

7. Find the sum of x 5 2 and --g-, and the difference between the same two 

numbers. 

8. Divide f by jo, giving a reason for each step in the process. 

9. Add together 1 mile 44 rods 12 feet, and 6 furlongs 35 rods 4£ feet. 

10. If A can do a piece of work in 4 days, B in 6 days, and C in 3 days, how 

long would it take them together to do the work ? 
4 

11. Reduce =-|i of an hour to minutes. 

12. What per cent, of a number is one-eighth of the number? 

13. When a dollar in gold is worth $1.17i in currency, how much gold will one 

dollar in currency buy? 

14. What will be due August 1, 1874, on a note of $900, dated September 4th, 

1870 — interest being reckoned at 5 per cent.? 

15. If 15 men can harvest a field of wheat in 12 days, how many men can 

harvest it in 5 days? 

16. A merchant owning 1 of a ship, sells f of his share for $16,800; what is 

the value of the whole ship, at tbis rate, and what part of the ship 
has he left? 

17. Divide 2£ by 3-J-, and multiply the quotient by .85 • 

18. For what sum must a note, payable in 60 days, be drawn, to produce $493, 

discounted at a bank at 8 per cent. ? 

19. A cubical box contains 262144 inches; what is the depth of the box? 

20. If 4 men can dig a ditch 72 rods long, 5 feet wide, and 2 feet deep, in 12 

days, how many men can dig a ditch 120 rods long, 6 feet wide, and 
li feet deep, in 9 days? 

SPELLING. 

Mere, lapel, covet, mongrel, incurred, festivity, guise, vivacious, pallid, 
colonnade, confectionery, austere, venom, delicacy, coercion, inclement, deci- 
sion, turbulent, musky, probability. 



56 



APPENDIX. 



G. 

LIST OF APPROVED CANDIDATES FOR SITUATIONS 
AS TEACHERS, EXAMINED FEB. 22, 1875. 



NAME. 



Grace L. Sargent, . 
*Helen L. Ham, . . 

Sara Swan, .... 

Sarah E. Stevenson, 

Emma Davenport, . 

Belle F. Batchelder, 

Josephine Drach, . 

Ella L. Wright, . . 

Alice M. Clark, . . . 

E. Mary Schelenger, 

Bertha A. Baron, 
J Viola A. Hamblett, . 
. Adelaide Baker, . . 

Leona C. Kyle, . . 

Ella A. Howe, . . . 

Florence L. Lovett, . 

Jennie C. Boardman, 

M. Annie Cooledge, . 

Lizzie M. Dowling, . 

Agnes I. Meldrum, . 

Mercena F. Whitehorn 
*Ellen A. Stillings, . 

Elizabeth F. Webster, 

Emma J. Miller, . . 

Katie G. Jones, . . 

Mary E. Rogers, . . 



EXPERIENCE. 



( 2 terms ) 
( Eve'g School, \ 

None, . . 



None, . . 

6 weeks,4mos 
Eve'g School, 

None, . . 

None, . . 

None, . . 

None, . . 

None, . . 

1 year, . . 

None, . . 

3 months, . 

6 months 
Eve'g School, 

None, . . , 

j 4 months 
I Eve'g School, 

None, . , 

j 4 mos. Acad. 
} Hartland, Me 
\ 2t'msDis.Sch 
j 4 m. Lowell do 
j 10 weeks 
j Eve'g School, 

1 year, . . 
6 months, . 
6 months, . 

None, . . 

j 4 months 
I Eve'g School 

1 year, . . 
9 years, . . 



EDUCATED AT 



Salem Normal School. 

Lowell Schools and 

Salem Normal School. 
N. Eeading H. S., 9 mos., 

Green G. S., Salem N. S. 
Lowell Schools and 

Salem Normal School. 
Lowell Schools and 

Salem Normal School. 

Carthage, 111., & Lowell Schools. 

Lowell Schools. 

Lowell Schools and 

Salem Normal School. 

Lowell Schools. 
Salem Normal School. 

Lowell Schools. 

\ Lowell Schools and 

\ Salem Normal School. 

Lowell Schools. 

Lowell Schools and 

Salem Normal School. 

Lowell Schools, 

Lowell Schools and 

Salem Normal School. 

Boston and Lowell Schools. 
Lowell Schools. 
Lowell Schools. 

Lowell Schools. 

Lowell Schools and 

Salem Normal School. 

Lowell High School. 
Lowell Schools. 
Lowell Schools. 
Lowell Schools. 
Framingham Normal School. 



* Elected to schools during the year. 



APPENDIX. 



57 



LIST OF APPROVED CANDIDATES— Continued. 





NAMES. 


EXPERIENCE. 


• EDUCATED AT 


Minnie C. Smith, . . 


None, . . 




Lowell Schools, 


*Nellie S. Danforth, . . 


None, . . 




Lowell Schools. 


Mary E. Thompson, 


10 years, 




Howe Academy, Billerica. 


Minnie F. Wing, . . . 


18 months, . 




Lowell Schools. 


Nellie A. Kimball, . . 


5 years, . . 




j Littleton Schools and 

j App. Acad., N. Ipswich, N. H. 


Lizzie A. Nolan, . . . 


None, . . 




j Lowell Schools and 

(• Salem Normal School, 


Ella M. Plumado, . . 


( 4 months 
( Eve'g School, 


'] 


Lowell Schools. 




C Lowell Schools and Academy of 
< Notre Dame. Now attending 
( Salem Normal School. 


Katie G. McLaughlin, . 


None,' . . 










Sarah W. Paige, . . . 


6 years, . . 




Lowell Schools. 
( Georgetown Academy, Texas ; 


Mary F. Talbot, . . . 


11 months, . 




< Abbott Academy, Andover; 


Harriette H. Eaton, . . 


( 4 months 
} Eve'g School, 


} 


( and B. N. S. 
Lowell Schools. 


*Mary A. Hammill, . . 


None, . . 




Lowell Schools. 


Anna Kohawn, . . . 


( 4 months 
( Eve'g School, 


! 


Lowell Schools. 


H. Eugenie Thompson, 


None, . . 




Lowell Schools. 


Ada L. Miles, .... 


None, 




( Lowell Schools and 

( 1 year Salem Normal School. 








Hannah P. Wright, . . 


{ 1 term in New 
( Hampshire, 


I 


Lowell Schools. 


Ida T. Hardy, .... 


2 terms, . . . 




( Lowell High and 

( Salem Normal Schools. 


Frances M. Talbot, . . 


2 years, 3mos., 




Bridgewater Normal School. 


Delia T. Brady, . 


Eve'g School, . 




Lowell Schools. 


Lizzie J. West, . . . 


None, . . . 




Concord, N. H, and 

New Hampton. 


S. Lizzie Healey, . . . 


None, . , . 




Lowell Schools and 

Salem Normal School. 



Certificates of Qualifications were also granted to the following, who at the 
time of the examination were serving as substitutes in the Public Schools : 



*Edith A. Gove, Nellie Kohawn, 

*Josephine A. Paulint, Maria L. Trask, 
Nellie M. Brown, Clementine H. Bowers, 



*Maria W. Roberts, 
Imogene F. Thomas, 
Frances E. Morrill. 



* Elected to schools during the year. 



58 



APPENDIX. 



H. 

NAMES OF HIGH AND GRAMMAR SCHOOL TEACHERS, 

THEIR SCHOOLS, DATE OF ELECTION, SALARIES AND RESIDENCES. 



Jan. 1, 1876. 

SCHOOLS. 



High. 



Grammar Sch'. 
Bartlett 



TEACHEKS. 



Chas. C. Chase, Principal, 

Edwin H. Lord 

James S. Russell 

Mary A. Webster 

Marietta Melvin 

Elizabeth McDaniels... 

Harriet C. Hovey 

Charlotte E. Draper.... 

Julia S. Bennett 

Helen L. Ham 



Colburn. 



Edson . 



Franklin. 



ELECTED. SALARIES 



Green 



Mann. 



Moody. 



Sherman 
Varnum . 



Samuel Bement, Principal 

Marianne B. Kent , . 

Abbie E. French 

Mary E. Pike 

Cemantha R. Nichols.. . 

M. Ida Howe 

Edith A. Gove 

Sophia P. YVetherbee . . 

Caroline E. Holt 

Albert L. Bacheller, Prin. 

Elizabeth W. Frost 

Sarah J. Crosby 

Susan M. Andrews 

Mary A. Hammill 

Emma C. Sawyer 

Arvilla L. Reader 

C. W. Burbank, Principal, 

Mary E. Stone 

Helen A. Bowers 

Maria C, R. Swan 

Anna A. Sargent 

Mary F. Carleton 

Fannie A. Scripture 

Mary A. Balch 

Josephine A. Paulint 

Perley Balch, Principal . . 

Sarah E. French 

Abbie F. Woodward. 

Luella A. Wardwell 

Fannie M. Clark 

Albert L. Fisk, Principal,. 

Ida A.Hill 

Annie E. Richardson 

Net tie E . Carleton 

Ruth B. Bailey 

Ellen S. Burrill 

Ida Sheldon 

Annie C. Howe 

Vacancy. 

Nellie M. Gallagher, Prin 

Frances M. Webster 

Laura F. Howe 

Celestia P. Chase 

Julia M. Healey 

Joseph Peabody,Princip' 

Mary E. Way..." 

Helen A. Haggett 

Mary E. Hardman 

Cora V. Barnard 

Laura J. Pindar 

Sarah E. Bailey 

Frances E . Hard man 

Frances E. Garrity 

Cornelia Davis, Principal 

D. P. Galloupe, Principal 

GeorgianaF. Vinton 

Harriet Bradley 

Sarah F. Dillingham 

Sarah A. Bradley 

Clara A. Hannaford 

Maria W. Roberts 

*B. Harrison 

fGeprge F. Willey 



1845 
1873 
1835 
1860 
1859 
1868 
1870 
1870 
1875 
1875 

1851 

1859 
1874 
1848 
1867 
1873' 
1875 
1S47 
1856 
1874 
1857 
1868 
1864 
1875 
1867 
1871 
1872 
1874 
1873 
1862 
1864 
1856 
1873 
1865 
1875 
1845 
1867 
1S69 
1870 
1874 
1374 
1870 
1871 
1867 
1871 
1860 
1871 
1874 

1868 

1S73 

1856 

1867 

1870 

1856 

1858 

1S65 

1873 

1874 

1856 

1856 

1873 

1874 

1873 

1853 / 

1872 

1854 

1870 

1857 

1869 

1875 

1865 

1S66 



$2,500 
2,000 
1,700 
850 
750 
750 
750 
750 
650 
650 

1,700 
600 
450 
600 
600 
600 
400 
600 
600 

1,700 
600 
600 
600 
400 
600 
600 

1,700 
450 
500 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
400 

1,700 
600 
600 
600 
450 

1,700 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
450 

1,000 

500 

600 

600 

600 

1,700 

600 

600 

600 

450 

600 

600 

500 

450 

1,000 

1,700 

600 

600 

600 

600 

600 

400 

1,500 

1,700 



RESIDENCES. 



11 Ne smith street. 

10 Nesmith street. 

39 Nesmith street. 
45 Myrtle street. 

381 Merrimack street. 
260 Stackpole street. 

12 Fourth street. 

150 Worthen street. 

60 Chestnut street. 
9 Seventh street. 

428 Merrimack street. 
428 Merrimack street. 

40 Marion street. 
53 Third street. 

399 Merrimack street. 
28 Third strert. 

11 Appleton Corporat'n. 
23 Kirk street. 

430 Merrimack street. 

11 Bridge street. 
290 Central street. 

151 Gorhnm street. 
42 Walnut street. 

2 Carpet Corporation. 
2 Blanchard place. 
106 Appleton street. 
4 Coral street. 

13 Cottage street. 
56 Tyler street. 

35 Adams street. 
260 Gorham street. 
42 Chapel street. 
269 Central street. 
8 Favor street. 
S9 Westford street. 
8 Favor street. 
2 Butterfleld street. 
73 Branch street. 
30 School street. 
375 Middlesex street. 
126 Fairmount street. 
7 Cabot street. 
399 Merrimack street. 

42 Chapel street. 
200 Moody street. 

1 Lawrence Corporat'n. 
35 Howard street. 
26 Third street. 

70 Bartlett street. 
45 Myrtle street. 
166 Stackpole street. 

61 Tilden street. 
45 Worthen street. 

152 Appleton street. 
22 Tyler street. 

28 High street. 

158 Stackpole street. 

43 E. Merrimack street. 
35 Tvler street. 

88 High street. 

158 Stackpole street. 
42 High street. 
32 Willow street. 
84 Methuen street. 
32 Fourth street. 
38 Fourth street. 
131 Bridge street. 
145 Bridge street. 

89 Bridge street. 

12 Richardson street. 
Arlington street. 

32 Appleton street. 



* Teacher of Penmanship and Drawing 



t Teacher of Vocal Music. 



APPENDIX. 



59 



NAMES OF PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS, 

THEIR SCHOOLS, DATE OF ELECTION, SALARIES AND RESIDENCES. 



SCHOOLS. 


TEACHERS. 


ELECTED. 


SALARIES. 


RESIDENCES. 


Primary No 


. 1.... 








7 Favor street. 




2.... 




1873 


$500 


23 Pawtucket street. 




3.... 




1869 


600 


19 Chelmsford street. 


* 


4.... 




1855 


600 


42 Chapel street. 




5.... 




1875 


400 


Ill Howard street. 




6.... 




1873 


600 


152 Appleton street. 




7.... 


Martha S, Williams... 


1854 


600 


276 Central street. 




8...0 


Mariha A. Franklin. . . 


1866 


600 


67 Vernon street. 




9 


*Kate G. McLaughlin. 






62 Suffolk street. 




10.... 




1847 


600 


14 Dodge street. 




11.... 


Isabella V. McAnulty 


• 1867 


600 


7 Hurd street. 




12.... 




1838 


600 


129 Moody street. 




13.... 


Cornelia M. Davis .... 


1871 


600 


40 Rock street. 




14. . . . 


S. Augusta Haggett. . . 


1870 


600 


28 High street. 




15.... 


Abbie K. Worthley 


1871 


600 


94 South street. 




16. .. 




1870 


600 


46 Fairmount street. 




17.... 




1866 


600 


134 Appleton street. 




18.... 




1857 


600 


178 Lawrence street. 




19.... 




1871 


600 


74 Lawrence street. 




20.... 




1871 


600 


20S Gorham street. 




21.... 




1872 


600 


34 Adams street. 




22.... 




1871 


600 


4 Mt. Washington st. 




23.... 




1873 


500 


20 Princeton street. 




24.... 




1S57 


600 


281 Central street. 




25.... 


Aurelia L. Howe.... . 


1844 


600 


166 Stackpole street. 




2(5.... 


Charlotte E. Brown. . . 


1870 


600 


158 Fletcher street. 




27.... 




1868 


600 


28 Wamesit street. 




28.... 


Emily M. Warren. ... 


1842 


600 


68 Chelmsford street. 




29.... 


Jennie F. Woodward . 


1871 


600 


73 Branch street. 




30.... 




1873 


600 


33 Tanner street. 




31.... 


Elizabeth A. Balch.... 


1873 


600 


133 E. Merrimack street. 




32.... 


Ellen F. Coughlan 


1853 


600 


15 Austin street. 




33.... 


Amanda M. Hadley. . . 


1870 


600 


281 Central street. 




34.... 




1857 


600 


3 Nichols street. 




35.... 


Clara A. Emerson .... 


1869 


600 


84 Andover street. 




36.... 




1844 


600 


Cor. Coral and Grove st. 




37.... 




1861 


600 


274 Central street. 




38... 




1865 


600 


143 Moody street. 




39.... 




1873 


500 


110 Stackpole street. 




40.... 




1866 


600 


94 South street. 




41.... 


Lilla J. Greenhalge . . . 


1871 


600 


6 Ash street. 




42.... 




1869 


600 


86 Tremont street. 




43.... 




1865 


600 


158 Fletcher street. 




44.... 


Mary L.Hill 


1858 


600 


126 Worthen street. 




45.... 


Ellen M.White 


1863 


600 


6 Coral street. 




46.... 




1869 


600 


32 Third street. 




47. . . . 


Miranda W. Bradley.. 


1852 


600 


38 Fourth street. 




48.... 




1870 


eoo 


21 Eleventh street. 




49. . . . 


Marcella M. Patten . . . 


1868 


600 


98 First street. 




50.... 




1873 


500 


18 Bleachery street. 




51 




1868 


600 


7 Oak street. 




52.... 




1870 


600 


12 High street square. 




53.... 




1845 


600 


15 S. Highland street. 




54.... 




1854 


600 


15 S. Highland street. 




55.... 


Nellie S. Danforth 


1875 


400 


11 Sixth street. 




56.... 

57.... 

1.... 




1873 

1873 

1874 


500 
500 
500 


141 Grand street. 




Belle T. Vinal 


219 Thorndike street. 


Mixed No 




Linden avenue. 




2.... 




1874 


600 


Varnum avenue. 




3.... 


Jenny M. Nesmith . . . 


1874 


600 


899 Middlesex street. 



* Temporary teachers. 



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CITY DOCUMENT 1875. 



AUDITOR'S 



^ks 



Receipts and Expenditures 



CITY OF "LOWELL, 



Together with the Treasurer's account for the financial year ending 
December 31st, 1875. 




LOWELL, MASS.: 
WARDEN & ROWELL, PRINTERS, MUSEUM BUILDING, MERRIMACK STREET. 

1&76. 



CITY OF LOWELL. 



In Common Council, January 1], 1876. 
Bead and sent up to the Board of Aldermen. 

DAVID CHASE, Clerk. 
In Board of Aldermen, January 11, 1876. 
Received and read. 

SAMUEL A. McPHETRES, City Clerk. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



f\ecei<pt$ kr|(! I^x:pe:qditttfe$ 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1875. 



AUDITORS REPORT. 



City of Lowell, | 

Auditor's Office, January 11, 1876. \ 

Gentlemen of the City Council : 

In accordance with the requirements of the Ordinances of the 
City, the Auditor herewith presents the Fortieth Annual Report of 
the Receipts and Expenditures of the Cit}- of Lowell, showing the 
financial transactions for the year which terminated on the 31st day 
of December, 1875, with the details under the separate heads. 

Annexed are schedules of Real and Personal Property belong- 
ing to the City, a statement of the City Debt, and debts due the 
City. 

RECEIPTS. 

The whole amount of money received into the Treasury 
from all sources, from December 31st, 1874, to 
December 31st, 1875, as by the account of the 
Treasurer, was $ 1,039,729 59 

Of this amount there was received 

For Taxes of 1873 $ 7,172 10 

Taxes of 1874 '16.117 10 

Taxes of 1875 650,333 65 

Schools 985 55 

School Houses 9,469 64 

Roads and Bridges 41,134 54 

Reserved Fund 63,807 64 

Paupers 7,446 53 

Police 6,211 45 

Fire Department 3,097 49 

Sewers and Drains 9,421 79 

Amount carried forward, $815,197 48 



auditor's report. 



Amount brought forward, $815,197 48 

Received 

For Commons • 432 50 

Lighting Streets and Public Buildings 57 21 

Repairs of Public Buildings 216 79 

City Library • 3,610 65 

Health Account 13 00 

Water Works 94,908 14 

State Aid 14,521 51 

Corporation Tax. 26,872 55 

Citv Debt 10,000 00 

Interest on City Debt 8,623 19 

Temporary Loan 61 .000 00 

National Bank Tax 4,276 57 

$1,039,729 59 

EXPENDITURES. 

The amount expended and ordered to be paid from 
the Treasury from December 31, 1874, to Decem- 
ber 31, 1875, was 81,162,922 95 



These expenditures are chargeable to the following 
appropriations or accounts, viz : 

To Schools $126,739 85 

School Houses 42,312 76 

*Roacls and Bridges 142,379 60 

Reserved Fund 34,604 70 

Paupers 27,871 67 

Police 57.560 17 

Fire Department 46.797 09 

Sewers and Drains. 72,514 64 

Commons 5.135 32 

Printing and Advertising 3,712 54 

Lighting Streets and Public Build- 
ings .. 22,061 63 

Repairs of Public Buildings 38,886 27 

City Library 4,564 78 

Salaries 20.775 00 

Health Account . 1,425 08 

State Aid 13,399 68 

Water Works 275,660 78 

City Debt 20,500 00 

Amount carried fonoard, $956,901 56 

*For actual expenditures, see Expenditures for Roads and Bridges in detail. 



auditor's report. 



Amount brought forward, $956,901 56 

Paid 

To Interest on City Debt 35,1 65 80 

State Tax for 1875 = 38,580 00 

County Tax for 1 875 24,750 1 6 

Sinking Fund for the reduction of the 

Lowell Water Loan Debt 25,000 00 

Temporary Loan 61 ,000 00 

National Bank Tax 21,525 43 



Making the whole amount of ex- 
penditures for the year 1875 ...» $1,162,922 95 



The whole amount of expenditures in 

1875, was 1,162,922 95 

The whole amount of receipts in 1875, 

was 1,039,729 59 

Excess of expenditures over receipts. . Si 23.1 93 36 



The balance in the- Treasury, January 

1st, 1875, was, * 348,342 65 

The whole amount received into the 

Treasury in 1875, was 1,039,729 59 

Making a total of 1,388,072 24 

The amount actually paid from the 
Treasury for all purposes during 
the year ending December 31, 1875, 

was" 1,190,439 86 

1,190,439 86 

Balance in the Treasury, January 1, 1876 197 632 38 

There remains unpaid the draft for 

December, 1875, amounting to. . . . 39,203 01 

39,203 01 

Balance in Treasury after the payment 

of the December draft ' $158.429 37 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



The amount of the City debt, December 

31st, 1874, was 2,289,000 00 

There has been paid during the year 
one note which became due No- 
vember 1st, 1875, to the City Insti- 
tution for Savings 10,500 00 



2,278,500 00 



There has been negotiated with the 
Lowell Institution for Savings 
dining the year, a loan of ten 
thousand dollars on the City's note 
for ten years, dated July 1st, 1875, 
bearing interest at the rate of six 
per cent, per annum, payable semi- 
annually (on account of an assess- 
ment made by the County of 
Middlesex for the construction of a 
bridge across Merrimack River at 
Tyngsboro') 10,000 00 



10,000 00 



Total amount of the City's debt, De- 
cember 31, 1875 $2,288,500 00 



Of the above amount, 8588,500 00 be- 
longs to the ordinary City Debt.. 538,500 00 

The amount of the debt of the Citv to 
December 31, 1875, for the con- 
struction of the Water Works is. . 1,750,000 00 



Total amount of the City Debt, De- 
cember 31, 1875, as. above $2,288,500 00 



Respectfully submitted, 

DAVID CHASE, 

Auditor of Accounts. 



APPEOPKIATXONS AND EXPENDIXUKES. 



The amount of the several Appropriations made by the City Coun- 
cil DURING THE YEAR THE AMOUNT OF THE UNEXPENDED BALANCES 

of 1874 the transfers from one appropriation to another 

the amount received into the treasury from other 

sources than taxes — the expenditures in detail under each 
Appropriation, and the Undrawn Balances ; also the 

amount of the clty debt debts due the clty schedules 

of Real and Personal Property, &c. 



SCHOOLS. 

Balance undrawn January 1st, 1875.....$ 14,909 59 

Appropriated and assessed in 1875. 125,000 00 

$139,909 59 

RECEIVED INTO THE TREASURY. 

From Alfred E. French, for tuition,. 60 00 

John E. Foster, for tuition,. ........ 10 00 

Joseph Lannan, for tuition,. 10 00 

Walter H. Lamere, for tuition, 80 00 

Fred. E. Lamere, for tuition,. 80 00 

Harry W. Marsh, for tuition, 40 00 

Sydney E. Stuart, for tuition, 40 00 

Walter F. Thissell, for tuition, 40 00 

Hattie V. Ames, for tuition, 40 00 

Alice Besse, for tuition. 10 00 

Grace E. Besse, for tuition, 10 00 

Susie F. Clark, for tuition, «... 60 00 

Susie A. Clayton, for tuition, 20 00 

Amounts carried forward, $400 00 $139,909 59 



10 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $400 00 $139,909 59 

Received on account of SCHOOLS : 

From Alice L. Fox, for tuition, 10 00 

Cora A. Fox, for tuition, 20 00 

Lottie A. Thissell, for tuition, 10 00 

John Boyle, for lighting Ward Room 1 50 

L. G-. Howe, for clock and dressing 2 00 

E. H. Lord, for blackboard, 6 00 

Charles Morrill, supt., for books,.. . . 95 95 
First Congregational Society, for 

heating to January 6, 1875..... 45 00 
Appropriation for School Houses, for 

lumber,. ... = .. .■ 3 14 

Appropriation for Fire Department, 

for rent and material, 199 11 

Appropriation for City Library, for 

duster, 3 50 

Appropriation for Police, for brooms 11 80 
Appropriation for Water Works, for 

desk, 2 00 

Reserved Fund, for heating, pails, 

mop and brooms,. .............. 1 75 55 

985 55 



SM0,895 14 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for Instruction i 

HIGH SHOOOL, 

To Charles C. Chase, Principal, $2,500 00 

Edwin H. Lord, 2,000 00 

James S. Russell, 1 693 02 

• Frank T. Benner, 645 07 

Ch. de Fronclat, 297 95 

Mary A. Webster, 790 00 

Marietta Melvin, 750 00 

Elizabeth McDaniels, 750 00 

Harriet C. Hovey, 750 00 

Charlotte E. Draper, 750 00 

Julia S. Bennett, 217 81 

Helen L. Ham 217 81 



11,361 66 



Amount carried forward, Si 1 ,361 66 



SCHOOLS. 



11 



Amount brought forward,. 
Paid for INSTRUCTION : 



$11,361 66 



BARTLETT SCHOOL, 

To Samuel Bement, Principal, 1 ,700 00 

Marianne B. Kent, 600 00 

Mary E. Pike, 541 77 

Sophia P. Wetherbee, 600 00 

Caroline E. Holt, 600 00 

Mary C. Gardner, 2 1 7 86 

Abby E. French, 420 00 

M. Ida Howe 412 85 

Cemantha R. Nichols, 555 57 

Edith A. Gove, 240 21 

Frances E. Morrill, 58 75 

Imogene F. Thomas, ...» 47 00 

Josephine A. Paulint, 24 00 

Ida T. Hardy, 6 50 

6,024 51 

COLBURN SCHOOL. 

To Albert L. Baeheller Principal,. 1,700 00 

Elizabeth W. Frost, . , 534 72 

Susan M. Andrews, 600 00 

Sarah J. Crosby, 600 00 

Emma C. Sawyer, , 600 00 

Arvilla L. Reader, 600 00 

Mary A. Hammill, 92 00 

Mary F. Talbot, , 39 00 

4,765 72 

EDSON SCHOOL. 

To Calvin W. Burbank, Principal, 1,700 00 

Mary E. Stone, 420 00 

Maria C. R. Swan, 596 37 

Anna A. Sargent, , 599 37 

Mary F. Carlton,. ......... 600 00 

Fannie A. Scripture, 392 08 

Mary A. Baleh,. 600 00 

Josephine A. Paulint, 298 00 

Helen A. Bowers,. 306 47 

Olive W. Beane, 60 00 

Maria L. Tiask, , 99 00 

• Ada L. Miles, 72 00 

Alice M. Clark,. , 15 00 

Lizzie J. West, 2 00 

5,760 29 

Amount carried forward, , §27,912 18 



12 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



Amount brought forward, $27,91 2 18 

Paid for INSTRUCTION : 

FRANKLIN SCHOOL. 

To Perley Balch, Principal 1 ,700 00 

Sarah E. French,. 600 00 

Abbie F. Woodward, . . 595 08 

Lnella A. Wardwell, 597 48 

Fanny M. Clark, 41 9 ' 08 

Nellie M. Brown, 2 00 

Clementine H. Bowers, . 1 25 

3,914 89 

GREEN SCHOOL. 

To Albert L. Fiske, Principal, 1,700 00 

Ida A. Hill, 600 00 

Anna E. Richardson, , 599 37 

Nettie E. Carlton, 600 00 

Ruth B. Bailey, 600 00 

Ida Sheldon, 600 00 

Emma L. Pevey, 552 60 

Ellen S. Bnrrill, 577 50 

Annie C. Howe 420 00 

Anna M. Cooledge, 22 50 

E. Mary Schellenger, 1 6 00 

6,287 97 

MANN SCHOOL. 

To Nellie M. Gallagher, Principal, 1 ,000 00 

Frances M. Webster, 470 00 

Laura F. Howe, 600 00 

Celestia P. Chase 600 00 

Julia M. Healey, 600 00 

3,270 00 

MOODY SCHOOL. 

To Joseph Peabody, Principal,. 1,700 00 

Mary E. Way, 600 00 

Helen A. Haggett, 600 00 

Mary E. Hardman, 600 00 

Laura J. Pindar, 600 00 

Frances E. Hardman, 470 00 

Sarah E. Bailey, 600 00 

Cora V. Barnard, 420 00 

Frances E. Garity, 420 00 

6,010 00 

Amount carried forward, S47,395 04 



SCHOOLS. 13 

Amount brought forward, , $47,395 04 

Paid for INSTRUCTION : 

SHERMAN SCHOOL. 

To Cornelia Davis, Principal, , , . . 1 ,000 00 

1,000 00 

VARNUM SCHOOL. 

To Daniel P. Galloupe, Principal 1,700 00 

Georgianna F. Vinton, 529 92 

Harriet Bradley, 600 00 

Sarah F. Dillingham, . 579 96 

Sarah A. Bradley, 600 00 

Clara A. Hanaford, > 593 75 

Maria W. Roberts, 325 07 

Sara Swan, 6 00 

Nellie S. Danforth, . . > . . . 2 00 

4,93706 

TEACHER OF PENMANSHIP AND DRAWING. 

To Bertram Harrison, ,...., 1 ,500 00 

1".500 00 

TEACHER OF VOCAL MUSIC. 

To George F. Willey, 1,696 43 

1,696 43 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 
No. 1 .—To Hattie H. Eaton, . 70 00 

70 00 

No. 2.— To Annie S. Harlow, 470 00 

470 00 

No. 3— To Abbie G. Watson, 506 42 

Minnie C. Smith, 44 00 

Hattie H. Eaton, 22 00 

572 42 

No. 4.— To Lucy F. Carlton, 600 00 

600 00 

No. 5.— To Ellen A. Stillings, 247 50 

Elizabeth A. Stearns, 1 50 00 

39y go 

No. 6.— To Anna F. Peabody, 540 00 

540 00 

No. 7.— To Mary J. Rice, 480 00 

Martha S. Williams, 78 00 

Minnie F. Wing, . , 9 00 

567 00 

Amount carried forward, $59,745 09 



14 auditor's report. 

Amount brought forward, . §59,745 09 

Paid for INSTRUCTION : 

No. 8.— To Martha A. Franklin,.. 48147 

Nellie M. Brown, 6700 

— 548 47 

No. 9.— To Martha S. Williams, 519 00 

Katie G. McLaughlin 38 00 

557 00 

No. 10.— To Manha A. Neal, 600 00 

600 00 

No. 11.— To Isabella V. McNulty,. 600 00 

600 00 

No. 12.— To Eliza Merriam, 589 00 

Nellie M. Brown, 11 00 

600 00 

No. 13.— To Cornelia M. Davis, 600 00 

600 00 

No. 14.— To S. Augusta Haggett, 600 00 

600 00 

No. 15.— To Abbie R. Worthley, .... 600 00 

600 00 

No. 16.— To Marietta Hill, 600 00 

600 00 

No. 17.— To Sarah C. Fiske, 600 00 

600 00 

No. 18.— To Eliza Cowley, 600 00 

; 600 00 

No. 19.— To Lizzie N. Smith, 582 50 

Minnie F. Wing, 17 50 

600 00 

No. 20.— To Susie J. Perkins, 600 00 

— - — 600 00 

No. 21.— To Nellie F. Baker, 540 00 

540 00 

No. 22.— To Ella E. Gardner., 600 00 

600 00 

No. 23.— To Alice M. Healey,. • • ■ 470 00 

470 00 

No. 24.— To Ellen A. Bridge, 600 00 

600 00 

No. 25.— To Aurelia L. Howe, 600 00 

600 00 

No. 26.— To Charlotte E. Brown, 600 00 

600 00 

Amount carried forward, $70,860 56 



SCHOOLS. 15 

Amount brought forward, $70,860 56 

Paid for INSTRUCTION. 

No 27.— To Mary E. Drew 488 84 

Ida T. "Hardy, 73 00 

511 84 

No. 28.— To Emily M. Warren, 600 00 

■ 600 00 

No. 29.— To Jennie F. Woodward, 595 08 

Nellie M. Brown 2 00 

597 08 

No. 30.— To Alice L. Frye, 538 74 

538 74 

No. 31.— To Elizabeth A. Balch, 395 48 

Nellie Kohawn, 6125 

Ella M. Plumado. 2 00 

458 73 

No. 32.— To Ellen F. Coughlin, 600 00 

600 00 

No. 33.— To Amanda M. Hartley, 600 00 

600 00 

No. 34.— To Lizzie S. Lowe, 600 00 

600 00 

No. 35. — To Clara A. Emerson, 600 00 

Nellie M. Brown, 43 00 

.. ...:. . 643 00 

No. 36.— To Mary A. Beard, 600 00 

600 00 

No. 37.— To Lncretia A. Day 600 00 

600 00 

No. 38.— To Mary O. Kidder, 600 00 

600 00 

No. 39.— To Abby L. Sargent 470 00 

470 00 

No. 40.— To Sarah E. Scales 598 74 

598 74 

No. 41. — To Lilia J. Greenhalge, .. 591 00 

Nellie M. Brown, 9 00 

600 00 

No. 42.— To Lizzie M. Had ley 600 00 

600 00 

No. 43.— To Nellie M. Brown, 600 00 

600 00 

No. 44.— To Mary L. Hill, 600 00 

600 00 

No. 45.— To Ellen M. White, , . 600 00 

600 00 

Amount carried forward, ,. $81,878 69 



16 auditor's report. 



Amount brought forward, $81,878 69 

Paid for INSTRUCTION. 

No. 46.— To Ella A. Bailey, 594 96 

Ella A. Howe, 1 00 

Sara A. Swan,. 1 00 



No. 47.— To Miranda W. Bradley, 600 00 

No. 48.— To Marion A. Scott, 600 00 

No. 49.— To Marcella M. Patten, 592 00 

Nellie M. Brown, 8 00 

No. 50. — To Julia Leighton, 207 50 

Clementine H. Bowers, .. 187 50 

No. 51.— To Mary J. Alger, 600 00 

No. 52.— To H. Maria Mansur, 600 00 

No. 53.— To Sarah L. Gates,. 600 00 

No. 54.— To Abby D. Gates, 547 02 

Maria L. Trask, 34 00 

No. 55. — To Ella S. Stanwood, 240 00 

Nellie S. Danforth, 213 00 

No. 56,— To Laura E. Lee, k 470 00 

No. 57.— To Belle T. Vinal, 420 00 

Pawtucketville. — To Agnes J. Graves,.... 470 00 

Varnum Street. — To Laura J. Gould, 540 00 

Middlesex Village.— Jennie M. Nesmith,.. 540 00 



Amount carried forward, .....' $89,944 67 



596 96 
600 00 
600 00 

600 00 

395 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 

581 02 



453 


00 


470 


00 


420 


00 


470 


00 


540 


00 


540 


00 



SCHOOLS. 17 



Amount brought forward, $89,944 67 

Paid for INSTRUCTION : 

Paid SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC 
SCHOOLS and SECRETARY OF THE 
BOARD OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE : 

To Charles Morrill, Superintendent 2,300 00 

Charles Morrill, Secretary, 200 00 

2,500 00 



Paid for BOOKS and STATIONERY, and 
for BOOKS, etc., for CHILDREN OF 
INDIGENT PARENTS : 

To F. P. Coggeshall, for books, station- 
ery, &c, 1,865 66 

Joshua Merrill & Son, for book, station- 
ery, &c, 311 98 

J. J. Judkins, for books and stationeiy, 27 15 

Abel Whitney, for books and stationery, 60 25 

C. C. Chase, for books, 5 43 

Gin n Bros., for books, 8 15 

Thompson, Brown & Co., for books, .... 270 00 

J. B. Beers & Co., for ten copies of 

Middlesex County Atlas, 120 00 

G. T. Williams, for Scientific American, 
American Naturalist and Boston 
Journal of Chemistry, 9 25 

Paid for PRINTING, ADVERTISING 

and BINDING: 
To Brown & Chase, for printing, 121 75 ' 

Stone, Iluse & Co., for printing 3,500 
copies School Committee Report of 
1874, 393 04 

Stone, Huse & Co., for printing and ad- 
vertising 108 75 

Hunt Bros., tor printing and advertising, 13 00 

Marden & Rowell, for printing and ad- 
vertising, 89 37 

Knapp & Morey, for printing and ad- 
vertising, 135 28 

Bacheller, Dumas & Co., for binding 
3.500 copies School Committee's 
Report of 1874, 48 00 

Bacheller, Dumas & Co., for printing 

and binding, 116 92 



2,677 87 



Amounts carried forward, $1,026 11 $95,122 54 

3 



18 auditor's report. 

Amounts brought forward, SI, 026 11 $95,122 54 

Paid for PRINTING, ADVERTISING 
and BINDING: 

W. S. Simons, for distributing 3 500 

School Committee's Report, 17 50 

W. S. Simons, for posting, 9 50 

1,053 11 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To Bickford Lang, for services as Truant 

Officer, 1,000 00 

Jesse Huse, for services as Truant 

Officer, 1,000 00 

Reserved Fund for beating High School 
Building one year, to January 1st, 
1876,..' *. 500 00 

Reserved Fund, for new desks, labor, 

&c, 1,560 44 

Appropriations for School Houses, for 
lumber, moulding, varnish and shel- 
lac, 1,176 00 

Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 

for labor, fuel, &c, ... 6,244 93 

Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

labor, 4 00 

Appropriation for Repairs of Public 

Buildings, for wood, 1 7 50 

Appropriation for Water Works, for use 

of water one year, to April 1st, 1876, 634 50 

Appropriation for Water Works, for labor, 5 50 

H. R. Barker & Co., for steam, gas and 

water fixtures, labor, &c, 626 32 

Samuel Beck, for lead pipe, labor, &c.,. . 9 68 

T. Costello & Co., registers, repairing 

stove, &c, 51 85 

S. G. Mack & Co., for pipe, sheet lead, 

zinc, cups, labor, &c, 327 76 

A. H. Malcolm, for coal hods, and mica, 2 00 

J. W. Proctor, for steam and gas fix- 
tures, labor, &c, 77 13 

H. H. Wilder & Co, for registers, sink, 

coal hods, dust pans, labor, &c.,. . . 56 38 

H. Sutcliffe, for repairing stoves, 3 40 

Wallingford and Callaghan, for gal- 
vanized iron case, repairing stoves, 
&c, 23 05 

N. J. Wier & Co., for shovels, cups, 

grates, solder, labor, &c, 23 85 

Amounts carried fomvard, $13,344 29 $96,175 65 



SCHOOLS. 19 



Amounts brought forward,..., $13,344 29 $96,175 65 

Paid for SUNDRIES: 

D. H. Wilson & Co.. for copper coil and 

labor, ' 39 20 

Rice & Co., for wire cloth,.. = . 17 99 

Cole & Nichols, for castings, 223 02 

A. H. & J. H. Abbott, for nails, keys, 

labor, &c, 3 53 

H. B. Shattuck, for hardware, 1 1 1 40 

Fielding & Bartlett, for hardware, 46 81 

Jacob Rogers & Co., for hardware, 63 04 

Chas. E. Adams, for hardware, 42 01 . 

I). White & Sons, for brush, 17 50 

C. P. Talbot & Co., for soda ash, 
chloride of lime, potash, nitric acid, 

&c, 24 57 

Stiles, Rogers & Co., for grass seed, 90 

William E. Livingston, for coal and lime, 219 00 
Jonathan Kendall, for oil, shellac, band- 
ing, varnish, brushes, glue, alcohol, 

benzine, glass, puUy, &c, 56 82 

C. B. Coburn & Co., for brushes, waste, 
lantern globes, oil, packing, glass, 
fire brick, alcohol, hose, couplings, 
feather dusters, mop handles,. 

twine, glue, sand, &c, 244 96 

Alfred Barney, for pails, baskets and 

brushes, 26 50 

M. C. Pratt & Co., for lumber, mould- 
ings, labor, &c, 120 74 

A. L. Brooks & Co., for moulding,. .... 6 59 

Howes & Burnham, for lumber, 55 20 

H. Whitney & Co., for lumber,. ....... 65 85 

S. G. Bailey, for coal, 45 00 

Milton Aid rich, for ladder rounds, 4 00 

Crosby Furniture Co., for desks, labor, 

&c, 158 55 

Asahel Davis, for labor on desks,. .... 65 25 
Griffin, Lake & Gordon, for lumber and 

labor, 4 90 

N. B. Favor & Son, for sash and blinds, 30 25 

G. C. Blakeslee, for pump and labor,.. . 20 50 

Marshall & Crosby, for labor on desks, 10 00 

Artemas Merriam, for settees and chairs, 500 00 

Edward McEnnis, for soap,. . . 1 30 

F. & E. Bailey & Co., for thermometers, 8 50 

Amounts carried forward, ........... $15,578 1 7 $96,1 75 65 



20 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $15,578 17 $96,175 65 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

Charles I. Hood & Co., for mortars, 

filters and chemicals, 14 64 

Lowell Gas Light Co., for gas, 25 82 

•Carleton & Hovey, for materials used in 

making philosophical experiments, 210 41 

D. Bruce, for ventilators, 74 00 

C. H. Frost, for brooms, 30 75 

Russell & Cheeney, for matches, 4 40 

Bennett and Moulton, for mason work,. . 104 91 

D. M.Preseott & Co., for mason work,. . 12 00 
Rollins & Sargent, for mason work,. ... 3 00 
George H. Crafts, for reseating chairs,. . 7 50 
Frank J. Libby, for reseating chairs,. . . 6 20 
Charles Morrill, for 12 "Carney Medals" 

and expressage, 27 85 

Thomas Hall, for galvanometer and 

thermo multiplier, 75 00 

J. L. Hainmett, for glass wells, 18 00 

Bufford's Publishing, Engraving and Lith- 
ographic House, for design and 
412 copies School Diploma, 110 00 

D. Crowley, for ribbon, 9 00 

Fiske & Spalding, for tracing cloth,. ... 88 

Henry C. Church, for paper and waste,.. 2 44 

Estate of C. W. Rugg, for use of pianos, 29 00 

F. L. Richardson &TCo., for clock, 12 00 

George Thatcher, for clocks and labor,. . 118 75 

Adams & Co., for furniture, carpeting, 

&c, 70 47 

Benner Bros., for furniture, mats, feather 

dusters, &c, '. 403 02 

H. Hosford & Co., for cambric, 84 

Brooks, Owens & Carleton's band, for 

music furnished at school exhibition, 46 00 

Irwin A. Foote, for tuning and repair- 
ing pianos, 35 00 

B. Harrison, for filling in High School 
Diplomas and expenses attending 
State exhibition of Free Industrial 
Art School, 57 00 

Channing Whitaker, expenses attending 

Art Exhibitions in Boston & Lowell, 157 77 

George F. Willev, for use of horse and 

carriage,. . .". 300 00 



Amounts earned forward, $17,544 82 $96,175 61 



SCHOOLS. 21 



Amounts brought forward, 817,544 82 $96,175 65 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

Henry E. Spragne, for services in taking 

the names and ages of school 

children, 77 00 

Sager Ashworth, for recntting files,. ... 8 63 

W. H. Condon, for labor, 18 00 

W. E. Libby, for labor, 5 62 

Warren N. Roberts, for labor, 28 50 

James Covvell, for teaming, 1 50 

James Leach, for teaming and labor,. . . 14 25 

William Roberts, for teaming, 65 25 

C. H. Whitney, for teaming, 600 

Frank S. Adams, for ringing bell, 

(Franklin School House) , 1 2 00 

Kirk Bryant, for ringing bell, &c, 

(Franklin School House), 10 50 

Frank E. Nichols, for ringing bell, 

(Franklin School House), 10 00 

Willie E. Cleaves, for ringing bell, 

(Varnum School House), 10 00 

Fred Mansur, for ringing bell, (Varnum 

School House), 8 00 

Reserved Fund, for services of janitors, 5,451 67 

Ellen A. Bridge, for services as janitor, 20 00 

William Conuers, for services as janitor, 13 28 

A. F. Cogger, for services as janitor,.. 10 00 

John Cook, for services as janitor, 13 36 

Hannah Donovan, for services as janitor, 6 64 
Charles A. Harrison, for services as 

janitor, , 15 75 

S. Augusta Haggett, for services as 

janitor, 20 00 

Annie S. Harlow, for services as janitor, 1 67 

Aurelia L. Howe, for services as janitor, 20 00 

Joseph Moore, for services as janitor,. . 22 00 
Roderick McKenzie, for services as 

janitor, 26 72 

Jennie Nesmith, for services as janitor, 20 00 
Emily M. Warren, for services as jan- 
itor, « 200)0 

L. H. Quimbv, for services tending 

boiler, . . . ". 10 00 

George J. Sanborn, for ringing bell, 

(Varnum School House), 10 00 

22,336 92 



Amount carried forward, $118,512 57 



22 auditor's report. 



Amount brought forward, SI 18,512 57 

Paid for EVENING SCHOOLS, for IN- 
STRUCTION : 

To Gertrude Sheldon, 77 00 

Anna F. Anderson, 60 00 

Emma J. Miller, 62 00 

Josephine Sheldon, • . . . * 62 00 

Lucy J. Garrett, 58 00 

Belle Prescott, 62 00 

Lilla L. Plaisted, 51 00 

Marion J.Stevenson,. 61 00 

H. Minnie Robbins, 77 50 

Ella M. Plumado, 62 00 

Minnie F. Salmon, 26 00 

Hattie F. Brown, 32 00 

Mattie Worcester, 61 00 

M. Abbv Morrison, , 31 00 

Ella L. Wright, 27 00 

Anna P. Wright, 28 00 

Kate A. Hill, 77 50 

Helen F. Collins, 62 00 

Ida P. Hardy, * 34 00 

Lizzie A. Nolan 28 00 

May C. Hyde, 45 00 

Alice Morris, 27 00 

M. Ella Russell, 34 00 

Lucy L. Spalding, 28 00 

Nellie M. Gates, 28 00 

Ella Collins, 26 00 

Anna Kohawn, 44 00 

Helen C. Frye, 13 00 

Hattie A. Johnson, 26 00 

Sarah A. Paige, • 67 75 

Belle F. Bachelder, 33 00 

Georgie Eaton, 34 00 

Emma J. Rogers, 10 00 

Frances Home, » » 34 00 

Imogene F. Thomas, 13 00 

Josephine Paulint,. 17 00 

Hannah G. Crosby, 72 50 

Emma J. Fuller, 59 00 

Ella J. Wright, 35 00 

Grace L. Sargent, 28 00 

Fannie M. Talbot, 61 25 

Abbie A. Puffer, 53 25 

Amounts carried forward, $1,827 75 $118,512 57 



SCHOOLS. 23 



Amounts brought forward, $1,827 75 $118,512 57 

Paid for EVENING SCHOOLS, for IN- 
STRUCTION : 

Maria L. Trask, 61 00 

Mary E. Rogers, 27 00 

Dora P. Smiley, . . .- 6100 

Ada L. Miles, 27 00 

Helen A. Dodge, ...... 57 00 

Minnie F. Wing, . ... 6100 

Hattie H. Eaton, 28 00 

Nellie Kohavvn , 44 00 

Alice T. Lee, 62 00 

Lilla M. Dowling, 34 00 

Clara Howard 47 00 

Delia T. Brady, 27 00 

Dora Collins, 62 00 

Flora Home, 27 00 

EllaM. Flint, 34 00 

Sarah J. Gilman, 7 00 

Ida M. Wilson, 78 75 

Stella J. Allen 63 00 

Maria W. Roberts 35 00 

Sara R. Swan, 28 00 

Adelaide Baker „ 63 00 

Ella A. Howe, 63 00 

Nellie M. Brown, 63 00 

Helen H. Boardman, 62 00 

Jennie H. Read, 53 00 

Julia B. Bradt, 42 50 

Anna C. Way, 61 00 

Nellie M. Tucker 34 00 

Hattie A. Carle 61 00 

Nellie M. Jones 61 00 

Emma Davenport, 25 00 

Ida B. Cheney, 61 00 

Nellie Gookin, 61 00 

Elgie A. Jndkins 27 00 

Isabel A. Merriam, 50 00 

Sarah E. Healey, 100 

3,487 50 

Amount carried forward, $1 22,000 07 



24 auditor's report. 



Amount brought forward, - . . . $122,000 07 

Paid for DRAWING SCHOOLS, for IN- 
STRUCTION : 

To Channing Whitaker, 2,486 10 

B. Harrison 333 34 

B. Harrison, for drawing copies, plates, 

casts, &c 26 40 

Helen W. Wright, 156 00 

Isabella Cobnrn 56 00 

3,057 84 

Paid for. SUNDRIES for EVENING and 
DRAWING SCHOOLS: 

To Brown and Chase, for printing, 4 00 

Hunt Bros., for advertising 8 50 

Harden & Rowell, for printing and ad- 
vertising, 32 25 

Knapp & Morey, for advertising, 5 50 

Stone, Huse & Co., for printing and ad- 
vertising, 15 50 

W. S. Simons, for posting bills, 11 00 

Joshua Merrill & Son, for books, 

stationery, &c, 213 83 

William G. Ward, for labor, cambric, 
books, cases for drawings, binding, 

&c 41 57 

Lowell Gas Light Co., for gas, 377 85 

John Morrison, for rent of Mission 

Chapel, 15 45 

Primitive Methodist Church, for rent,. . 100 00 

Jonathan Ladd, for rent of Primitive 

Methodist Church, 90 00 

C. B. Coburn & Co., for oil and glass,. . 6 80 
French & Puffer, for burners, chimney 

and wicks, 70 

Offutt and Whitaker, for lamp, 40 

Griffin, Lake & Gordon, for labor, 35 

Fielding & Bartlett, for bells, 85 

George P. Lawrence, for furnaces, set- 
tees, and tables, 100 00 

James Cowell, for training, 2 25 

A. B. Carle, for services as janitor 47 25 

Moors Cole, for services as janitor,. ... 21 00 

George B. Davis, for services as janitor, 35 00 

Amounts carried forward, $1,130 05 $125,057 91 



SCHOOLS. 



25 



Amounts brought forward, $1,130 05 

Paid for SUNDRIES for EVENING and 
DRAWING SCHOOLS : 

James H. Hoyt, for services as janitor.. . 47 25 

L. P. Little, for services as janitor,. ... 62 00 

John Powers, for services as janitor,. . . 31 25 

L. H. Quimby, for services as janitor, 

&c, 134 75 

Wiatt Stevens, for services as janitor,. . 53 50 

Reserved Fund, for labor, 86 84 

Appropriation for School Houses, for 

lumber and setting glass,. 9 75 

Appropriation for repairs of Public 

Buildings, for lumber, nails and 

labor, 8 30 

Appropriations for Police, for services 

of Police Officers, 118 25 

Whole expenditure for the* year, . 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1876,. ...... 



.25,057 91 



1,618 


94 


126,739 
14,155 


85 
29 


$140,895 


14 



SCHOOL HOUSES. 



Balance undrawn January 1st, 1875,.... 2,575 59 
Appropriated and assessed in 1875,. ..... 36,000 00 



RECEIPTS. 

Of S. W. Stickney, for rent of tenement 

on Kirk street, 220 00 

Mrs. W. H. Gage, for rent of tenement 

on Kirk street, 250 00 

Mrs. C. S. Finn, for rent of tenement 

on Kirk street, 400 00 

Margaret Fiske, for rent of tenement 

on Kirk street, 291 66 

W. H. Devlin, for rent of tenement on 

Kirk street, 30 00 

J. J. Forbish, for rent of tenement on 

Kirk street, 42 50 

John Masterson, for land on Adams 

and Cross streets, 3,666 25 

Stephen Castles, for land on Salem and 

Common streets, 2,400 00 

Stephen Castles, for old School House, 100 00 
L. G. Howe, for sash, broken glass, 

and desk,.. 13 85 

Appropriation for schools, for lumber, 

paint and setting glass,...., 27 62 

Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

paint, material and labor, 36 35 

Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 

for land taken for the extension of 

Worthon street, 1,927 50 

Appropriation for repairs of Public 

Buildings, for paint, 63 91 



5,575 59 



9,469 64 
$48,045 23 



SCHOOL HOUSES. 27 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for LAND and BUILDING for 
SCHOOL HOUSE on Common street : 

To John J. White, for 4,500 feet of land 

and buildings on Common street,.. 4,000 00 
Thomas F. Fay, for 6,751 feet of land on 

Common street 7,500 00 

Thomas F. Fay, for interest, 43 75 

Charles E. Adams, for hardware, 507 94 

Fielding & Bartlett, for hardware 30 62 

H. B. Shattuck, for hardware, 29 22 

T. Costello & Co., for water fixtures, 

labor, &c, 594 90 

S. G. Mack & Co., for galvanized iron 

work as per contract, 431 00 

S. G. Mack & Co., for iron, cesspools, 

&c, . 30 40 

Rice & Co., for window guards and wire 

. cloth,.. • 153 42 

J. C. Jockow, for iron work, 89 05 

John Butcher, for iron, 39 31 

Frank Calvert, for steam fixtures, 803 67 

Davis & Farnham, for pipe, 218 00 

George W.Huntoon, for registers, labor, 

&c, 132 50 

Lowell Gas Light Co., for castings,. . . . 29 70 

Richard Dobbins, for boiler, bolts, 

binders, castings, labor, &c.,. ..... 488 55 

C. B. Coburn & Co., for paint, shellac, 

window-cord, brushes, putty, bronze, 

&c, 93 65 

Fiske & Spalding, for labor, brushes, 

graining, color and sand, 33 50 

Jonathan Kendall, for glass, paints, 

glazier's points, magnesia, &c...... 415 19 

Sylvester Bean, for labor painting,.... 83 13 

Brown & Carter, for labor painting,.. . 36 25 

William Kelle} r , for labor painting, .. .. 138 12 

Clough & Sweatt, for stone, 4 00 

Frye & Kittredge, for labor and material 

as per contract, 6,100 00 

FYye & Kittredge, for extra labor on 

foundation, 300 00 

Amount carried forward, $22,325 87 



28 auditor's report. 



Amount brought forward, $22,325 87 

Paid for LAND and BUILDING for 
SCHOOL HOUSE on Common street : 

Frye & Kittredge, for lime, sand, brick, 

pipe, labor, &c 192 38 

Bennett & Monlton, for iron, sand, 

brick, and labor, 105 17 

D. M. Prescott & Co., for plastering as 

per contract, 1 ,443 50 

D. M. Prescott & Co., for mason work, 33 90 
A. Bachelder & Co., for lumber, mould- 
ing, labor, &c, . 890 05 

A. L. Brooks & Co., for lumber, mould- 
ing, labor, &c, ". 193 92 

Howes & Burnham, for lumber, 421 40 

William Kelley, for doors and blinds,. . 552 50 
M. C. Pratt & Co., for lumber, mould- 
ing, brackets, sash, &c, 1,291 02 

C. W. Saunders & Co., for lumber,. ... 1,501 95 
Griffin, Lake & Gordon, for lumber, 

labor, &c, 426 61 

E. A. & A. T. Smith, for concrete, 359 08 

Cherrington & Cherrington, for plans, 

specifications and details, 500 00 

John H. McAlvin, for cash paid for re- 
cording deed, '. 6 00 

Robert Goulding, for slating and tin- 
ning as per contract, 886 00 

Robert Goulding, for lead, tin and labor, 49 84 

Boston & Lowell R. R. Co., for freight, 15 30 

Hamilton Manufacturing Co., for gravel, 66 00 

Philip P. Brown, for filling, 71 60 

O. A. Simpson, for labor, 84 00 

Reserved fund, for labor,. 3.037 24 

Joseph Raynes & Co., for police badge, 2 00 
Appropriation for water-works, for labor 

and pipe, 42 40 



134,497 73 



Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To A. L. Brooks & Co., for lumber, . . 168 33 

Davis & Sargent, for lumber, 71 32 

Howes & Burnham, for lumber, 544 75 

William Kelley, for doors, sash and 

repairing blinds, 75 25 

M. C. Pratt & Co., for lumber, moulding, 

and brackets, 39 70 

Amounts carried forward,. $899 35 $34,497 -73 



SCHOOL HOUSES. 29 



Amounts brought forward, $899 35 $34,497 73 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

Parker & Cheney, for oak rolls, 2 67 

C. W. Saunders & Co., for lumber, 421 08 

H. Whitney & Co., for lumber, 94 91 

J. W. Bennett, for roofing, moulding, 

&c 133 62 

C. B. Coburn & Co., for oil, paints, 

varnish, brushes, sand blower, 

window cords, glass, &c., . . 440 83 

Jonathan Kendall, for paints, glass, 

brushes, window cords, shellac, 

varnish, &c, 

Brown & Carter, for paint and labor,. . . 

Wilder Leeman, for labor, 

N. T. Staples & Sons, for cesspools,. . . 
Charles F. Lane, for door strikers,.... 

Cole & Nichols, for sash weights, 

Davis & Newell, for floor jacks, 

Charles E. Adams, for hardware, 

Fielding & Bartlett, for hardware, 

Asa W. Mead, for lock and kej-s,.. .... 

Jacob Rogers & Co., for zinc, 

H. B. Shattuck, for hardware, 

J. C. Jockow, for hinges, 

John Butcher, for iron, 

Daniel Gushing & Co., for iron, pipe and 

labor, 

S. G-. Mack & Co., for ventilator, pipe, 

solder, copper, labor, &c, 

To J. W. Proctor, for pipe, fittings and 

labor. 

William E. Livingston, for brick, lime, 

sand, cement and hair, 

Bennett & Moulton, for brick, lime, 

sand, labor, &c, » 

John Burch & Co., for mason work,. . . . 
T. D. Bailey, for chimney cap, brick, 

labor, &c, 

S. D. Butterworth, for mason work, 
Charles O. Cook, for whitewashing,. .. . 
Frye & Kittredge, for pipe, labor, &c, 

W. P. Foy, for whitewashing, 

, D. M. Prescott & Co., for mason work, 

M. C. Page, for whitewashing, 

J. L. Powers, for whitewashing, 

Amounts carried forward, $3,396 15 $34,497 73 



296 04 




9 10 




3 50 




6 00 




75 




9 10 




15 00 




99 64 




73 50 




2 00 




54 




49 36 




5 00 




1 35 




23 13 




116 69 




22 95 




58 84 




22 95 




10 00 




9 90 




131 98 




7 00 




105 61 




15 00 




226 76 




5 00 




77 00 





30 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, S3, 896 15 $34,497 73 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

Wiatt Stevens, for whitewashing, 5 00 

H. M. Woodward, for mason work,. ... 14 93 
Robert Goulding, for slate, tin, zinc, 

solder and labor, ...■..■ 146 83 

O. A. Simpson, for stone and labor,. ... 27 50 

James Cowell, for teaming, 8 25 

James C. Little, for teaming, 2 25 

James Leach, for teaming,. ■•-. 6 50 

Alonzo N. Merrill, for labor, 5 00 

William Roberts, for teaming, 2175 

E. A. & A. T. Smith, for concrete, 328 10 

Margaret Fiske, for fire frames, 3 00 

J. A. Brabrook, for repairing harness, 3 50 

Saw} T er & Tajdor, for harness, 55 00 

Swett & Clough, for wagon and sleigh, 315 00 

John C. Bennett, for numbering doors, 2 18 

L. G. Howe, for boarding horse, 84 00 

E. B. Patch & Co., for advertising and 

selling land and buildings, 90 94 

Buttrick & Co., for salt, 83 

Stephen Castles, guardian, for land on 

Common and Salem streets 763 15 

Reserved fund, for labor, .' 2,304 92 

Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 

for sidewalk assessment, gravel, 

stone, and engineering services,. . . 154 90 
Appropriation for Sewers and Drains, 

for sewer assessment, .... 26 71 

Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

labor, 16 25 

Appropriation for Repairs of Public 

Buildings, for nails, screws and 

hinges, 4 33 

Appropriation for Water Works, for use 

of water and blacksmithing, 28 56 

7,815 03 

Whole expenditure for the year,. ...... . 42,312 76 

Transferred to appropriation for Repairs 

of Public Buildings, 5,000 00 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1876,.... 732 47 



$48,045 23 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1875, $24,146 99 

Appropriated and assessed in 1875, 80,000 00 

$104,146 99 

RECEIPTS. 

Received for SIDEWALK ASSESS- 
MENTS, MATERIALS, AND OTHER 
STREET ACCOUNTS : 

IN JANUARY. 
Of D. S. Kimball, for sidewalk assessment, 63 78 

Almira L. Allen, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 25 26 

D. Lovejoy, for sidewalk assessment, . . 52 38 

J. G. Marshall, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 57 36 

Catherine Kej'es, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 36 42 

Martin G-allagher, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 39 66, 

Hannah Abbott, for sidewalk assess- 
ment 30 84 

Joseph S. Brown, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 140 04 

B.N. Webber, for sidewalk assessment, 169 08 

Henry Robbins, for sidewalk assessment, 41 22 

Mrs. J. C. McLennan, for sidewalk 

assessment, ,•.•.•• 63 42 

Charles Littlefield, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, ., 20 04 

A. & J. C. Bachelder, for sidewalk 

assessment, 71 27 

John F. Hurlbut, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 37 02 

John Connell, for sidewalk assessment, 40 56. 

Mrs. A. H. Reecl, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 20 40 

Amounts carried forward, $908 75 $104,146 99 



32 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $908 75 $104,146 99 

Received for SIDEWALK ASSESS- 
MENTS, MATERIALS, AND OTHER 
STREET ACCOUNTS: 

Appleton Company, for sidewalk assess- 
ment 85 80 

George Webster, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 91 92 

E. R. Blair, for sidewalk assessment, . 84 60 
A. L. Russell, for sidewalk assessment, 13 98 
' A. D. Puffer, for sidewalk assessment, 104 56 
Patrick Finton, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, . . , 37 39 

W. C. Welch, for sidewalk assessment, 42 42 
D. H. Goodhue, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 82 62 

H. J. Sawyer, for sidewalk assessment, 41 22 

S. Winchester, for sidewalk assessment, 91 68 

D. Magee, for sidewalk assessment,.. . 38 04 
Mrs. Sidney Spalding, for sidewalk 

assessment, 138 00 

John Griffin, for sidewalk assessment,. • 46 30 
John Masterson, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 88 80 

N. Low, for sidewalk assessment, 134 19 

A. A. Sawtelle, for sidewalk assessment, 42 18 

J. A. G. Richardson, for edgestone,. ... 150 60 

Halladay & Vreeland, for paving, 8 12 

William Bass, for amount of bill re- 
fused, 25 00 

H. & A. Whitney, overdraft, 1 7 29 

J. C. Woodward* for fuel, 36 00 

T. L. Wakefield, for labor, 30 25 

Appropriation for Lighting, for labor, 

&c, 403 06 

Appropriation for Water Works, for 

engineering, 262 00 

Appropriation for Sewers and Drains, 

for engineering, 540 00 

Appropriation for Sewers and Drains, 

for labor, &c, 1,071 04 

Appropriation for School Houses, for 

labor, &c, 61 76 

Appropriation for Schools, for fuel,. . . 73 50 

Appropriation for Paupers, for fuel, .... 277 80 

Appropriation for Police, for fuel, 15 00 



Amounts carried forward, $5,043 87 $104,146 99 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 33 



Amounts brought forward, $5,043 87 $104,146 99 

Received for SIDEWALK ASSESS- 
MENTS, MATERIALS, AND OTHER 
STREET ACCOUNTS : 

Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

labor, 11 20 

Reserved Fund, for fuel and engineering, 139 13 



IN FEBRUARY. 



$5,194 20 



Of T. H. Elliott, for sidewalk assessment, 100 64 

John Dunlap, for sidewalk assessment, 35 64 

E. J. Crossman, for sidewalk assess- 
ment 62 64 

Appropriation for School Houses, for 

sidewalk assessment, 70 90 

Wm. B. Jones, for sidewalk assessment, 30 00 

J. F. Manahan, for sidewalk assessment, 112 20 

A. D. Kennedy, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, , 52 20 

D. W. Barth, for sidewalk assessment, 68 34 

C. W. Brooks, for sidewalk assessment, 66 12 
A. W. Dows, for sidewalk assessment, 71 76 
J. A. Buttrick, for sidewalk assessment, 85 80 
W. W. Wilson, for sidewalk assessment, 89 82 

D. M. Wills, for sidewalk assessment, 69 60 
J. G. Rogers, for sidewalk assessment, 111 10 

John Stott, for labor, 22 50 

Charles Stott, for street scrapings,. ... 5 75 

Charles A. Stott, for edgestones, 73 20 

Appropriation for repairs of Public 

Buildings, for labor, 19 85 

Appropriation for Lighting streets and 

Public Buildings, for labor, 16 40 

Appropriation for Fire Depaitment, for 

labor, 102 30 

Appropriation for Police, for fuel, 15 50 

Appropriation for Sewers and Drains, 

for labor, &c, 68 20 

Appropriation for Paupers, for fuel,... 515 50 

Appropriation for Schools, for fuel,. . . 623 35 

Reserved Fund, for labor, &c, 849 70 

3,339 01 



Amount carried forward, . $11 2,680 20 

5 



34 auditor's report. 



Amount brought forward, SI 12,680 

Received for SIDEWALK ASSESS- 
MENTS, MATERIALS, AND OTHER 
STREET ACCOUNTS : 

IN MARCH. 

Of Mrs. J. B. Fielding, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 130 86 

Hannah Smith, for sidewalk assessment, 65 34 

Catherine Cahill, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 55 33 

John Leary, for sidewalk assessment,. . 123 60 

Wright & French, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 10-3 08 

A. F. Jewett, for sidewalk assessment, 87 61 

Edward Ooggin, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 35 94 

Daniel Holt, for sidewalk assessment,. . 42 96 

C. R. Phelps, for sidewalk assessment, 76 44 

Charles O. Gray, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 41 64 

Walter H. Hickey, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, - • 74 27 

Patrick McCarty, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 16 31 

Mrs. B. F. Bo}'nton, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 84 90 

C. F. Varnum, for sidewalk assessment, 53 22 

Proprietors of Locks and Canals on 
Merrimack river, for sidewalk 
assessment, 26 16 

John Young, for sidewalk assessment,. 28 91 

Samuel Horn, for sidewalk assessment, 39 43 

Appropriation for Paupers, for labor, 

&c, 572 15 

Appropriation for Sewers and Drains, 

for labor, &c, 169 14 

Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

labor, &c, 44 45 

Appropriation for Schools, for fuel,... 266 20 

Appropriation for Commons, for labor, 63 98 

Reserved Fund, for labor, &c, 853 48 

3,055 40 

Amount carried forward, $1 15,735 60 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 35 



Amount brought forward, . $115,735 60 

Received for SIDEWALK ASSESS- 
MENTS, MATERIALS, AND OTHER 
STREET ACCOUNTS: 

1 IN APRIL. 
Of A. W. Monty, for sidewalk assessment, 46 32 
P. Plnnkett, for sidewalk assessment,. 19 71 
W. H. Wiggin, for sidewalk assessment, 177 74 
Luther Holt, for sidewalk assessment,. 93 13 
S. C. Smith, for sidewalk assessment,. 12 00 
John Brown, for sidewalk assessment,. 22 32 
C. G. Sargent, for sidewalk assessment, 98 58 
C. R. Kimball, for sidewalk assessment, 58 20 
Patrick Lynch, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, . * 202 68 

Mrs. P. C. Moore, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 76 86 

F. Goward, for sidewalk assessment,.. 60 00 

E. F. Wilder, for sidewalk assessment, 30 00 

W. M. Lee, for sidewalk assessment,. . 78 06 

A. Y. Caswell, for sidewalk assessment, 62 04 

W. H. Wiggin, for wood, 18 52 

J. C. Woodward, for coal, 5 00 

John Young, for manure, 2 00 

Appropriation for Schools, for labor,. . 250 23 
Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

labor, - • . 46 94 

Appropriation for Lighting Streets and 

Public Buildings, for labor, , 45 80 

Appropriation for Police, for labor,... 6 63 
Appropriation for Sewers and Drains, 

for labor, 167 58 

Appropriation for Sewers and Drains, 

for engineering, 103 00 

Appropriation for Paupers, for labor, 

&c.,:.., 703 77 

Appropriation for repairs of Public 

Buildings, for labor, &c, 2 55 

Reserved Fund, for labor, &c, 431 92 

Reserved Fund, for surveying, 288 00 

• 3,109 58 

IN MAY. 
Of S. Osgood and J. H. Prescott, for 

sidewalk assessment, 179 54 

Luther Richards, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 52 74 

Amounts carried forward, $232 28 $118,845 -18 



36 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $232 28 $118,845 18 

Received for SIDEWALK ASSESS- 
MENTS, MATERIALS, AND OTHER 
STREET ACCOUNTS : 

Catherine Sullivan, for sidewalk assess- 
ment ■ 74 82 

Heirs of A. W. Bailey, for sidewalk as- 
sessment, 159 72 

W. W. Bradford, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 22 50 

S. B. Puffer, for sidewalk assessment,. 157 53 

J. A. Masta, for sidewalk assessment, . 46 50 

Lucy O'Hare, for sidewalk assessment, 59 58 

W. F. Osgood, for sidewalk assessment, 76 13 

E. W. French, for edgestones, . . 48 00 

Appropriation for Water Works, for 

labor, 8 45 

Appropriation for repairs of Public 

Buildings, for labor, 34 18 

Appropriation for Lighting Streets and 

Public Buildings, for labor, 105 61 

Appropriation for Police, for fuel, 62 77 

Appropriation for Paupers, for labor,. . 247 35 

Appropriation for Schools, for labor, .. 120 14 

Reserved Fund, for labor, 336 00 

IN JUNE. 

Of Edwin Ripley, for sidewalk assess- 
ment 70 32 

County of Middlesex, for sidewalk as- 
sessment, 315 90 

W. D. Butler, for sidewalk assessment, 42 66 

Arthur Staples, for sidewalk assessment, 37 32 

J. R. Smith, for sidewalk assessment,.. 44 76 

Thomas Carolin, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 28 89 

John Shanahan, for sidewalk assess- 
ment 23 36 

L. W. Miner, for sidewalk assessment,. 179 27 

W. F. Sherman, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 121 20 

William Nichols, for labor, 7 50 

George Motley, for labor, 7 50 

J. C. Woodward, for stone, street scrap- 
ings, &c, 53 00 

Amounts carried forward, $931 68 $120,636 74 



1,791 56 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 37 



Amounts brought forward, . $931 68 $120,636 74 

Received for SIDEWALK ASSESS- 
MENTS, MATERIALS, AND OTHER 
STREET ACCOUNTS: 

Lawrence Manufacturing Company, for 

horse shoeing, 50 79 

Appropriation for Paupers, for fuel,.. . 100 50 

Appropriation for Commons, for labor, 

&c, 104 33 

Appropriation for Police, for fuel, 25 00 

Appropriation for Water Works, for 

labor, 3 50 

Appropriation for Sewers and Drains, 

for labor, &c, 422 46 

Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

labor, &c, 31 38 

Appropriation for repairs of Public 

Buildings, for labor, . 8 80 

Appropriation for Lighting Streets and 

Public Buildings, for labor, &c.,. .. 33 57 

Reserved Fund, for fuel, 14 50 



IN JULY. 

Of C. M. Pinney, for sidewalk assessment, 32 10 
E. R. Blair, for sidewalk assessment,. . 229 90 
H. P. Clough, for sidewalk assessment, 48 90 
Samuel Weeks, for sidewalk assessment, 70 98 
Frank Wasley, for sidewalk assessment, 37 44 
J. B. Richardson, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 4 62 

Otis Allen, for sidewalk assessment,.. 97 38 

B. Buckley, for coal,. . 10 00 

L. B. Little, for coal, 10 00 

Frye & Kittredge, for labor, 9 1 00 

J. C. Woodward, for coal and stone,.. 38 00 

Hailaday & Vreeland, for labor, 127 54 

H. R. Thornton, for land on South 

Highland street, 114 88 

Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

labor, 10 55 

Appropriation for Sewers and Drains, 

for labor, 133 52 

Appropriation for Schools, for labor,.. 99 51 
Appropriation for Lighting Streets and 

Public Buildings, for labor, 31 40 



1,726 51 



Amounts carried forward, $1,187 72 $122,363 25 



38 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $1,187 72 $122,363 25 

Received for SIDEWALK ASSESS- 
MENTS, MATERIALS, AND OTHER 
STREET ACCOUNTS : 

Appropriation for Health Account, for 

labor 66 00 

Reserved Fund, for labor, 154 38 

1,408 10 

IN AUGUST. 

Of Mrs. S. Holbrook, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 56 96 

A. A. Merrill, for sidewalk assessment, 95 64 

L. McFarlin, for sidewalk assessment,. 68 64 

P. Cummiskey, for sidewalk assess- 
ment 27 60 

Mrs. T. G. Gerrish, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 81 90 

Mrs. E. Symonds, for sidewalk assess- 
ment 29 04 

Mrs. S, E. Brown, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 77 82 

John Cusack, for sidewalk assessment, 236 66 

William Holmes, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, c 72 90 

Bartlett Davis, for sidewalk assessment, 92 02 

John H. Larrabee, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 115 98 

William Bascom, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 86 10 

S. Castles, Jr., for sidewalk assessment, 134 78 

Otis E. Blake, for sidewalk assessment, 73 38 

Ellen O'Neil, for sidewalk assessment, 3 03 

Ross & Jewett, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 41 22 

J. F. Harvey, for sidewalk assessment, 53 39 

John Kidder, for sidewalk assessment, 85 44 

H. W. Boardman, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 19 80 

George W. Green, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 89 41 

George W. Green, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 68 04 

William Cleworth, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 85 50 

Amounts carried forward, $1,695 25 $123,771 35 



KOADS AND BRIDGES. 89 



Amounts brought forward, $1,695 25 $123,771 35 

Received for SIDEWALK ASSESS- 
MENTS, MATERIALS, AND OTHER 
STREET ACCOUNTS : 

H. W. Streeter, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 150 77 

Mary F. A. Hill, for sidewalk assess- 
ment 33 66 

Tremont and Suffolk Mills, for horse 

shoeing, 18 23 

Mrs. Thomas MeGovern, for edgestone, 15 60 

J. C. Woodward, for stone, 27 00 

J. C. Jockow, for horse and dualin,. . . 48 75 

Appropriation for Paupers, for fuel,.. . 135 04 

Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

labor, 12 15 

Appropriation for Sewers and Drains, 

for labor,,.. 418 28 

Appropriation for Commons, for labor, 46 68 

Appropriation for Lighting Streets and 

Public Buildings, for labor, 20 23 

Appropriation for repairs of Public 

Buildings, for labor, 160 

Appropriation for Health Account, for 

labor, 54 00 

Reserved Fund, for labor, 17 25 

2,694 49 

IN SEPTEMBER. 

Of George C. Osgood, for sidewalk assess- 
ment 108 36 

J. Driscoll. for sidewalk assessment,.. . 128 64 
E. F. Watson, for sidewalk assessment, 182 88 
J. Bowers, for sidewalk assessment,.. . 131 28 
J. Preston, for sidewalk assessment,.. . 158 58 
Mrs. P. H. Lynch, for sidewalk assess- 
ment n 7 

Roxanna Fay, for sidewalk assessment, 46 86 
Charles H. Kelley, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 46 14 

L. R. J. Varnum, for sidewalk assess- 
ment 71 io 

Appropriation for repairs of Public 

Buildings, for sidewalk assessment, 569 41 

N. M. Lamson, for sidewalk assessment, 93 18 

J. Pearson, for sidewalk assessment,.. 19 32 

Amounts carried forward, $1,567 45 $126,465 84 



40 auditor's report. 



Amounts brougJit forward, SI, 567 45 $126,465 8 

Received for SIDEWALK ASSESS- 
MENTS, MATERIALS, AND OTHER 
STREET ACCOUNTS: 

S. Wheeler, for sidewalk assessment,. . 37 50 

First Universalist Society, for labor,... 64 85 

J.|C. Woodward, for stone and fuel,.. . 50 75 
Appropriation for Health Account, for 

labor 52 00 

Appropriation for Lighting Streets and 

Public Buildings, for labor 10 85 

Appropriation for Commons, for labor, 1 75 
Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

labor, 14 05 

Appropriation for Schools, for fuel, 1,992 12 
Appropriation for Sewers and Drains, 

for labor, 63 08 

Appropriation for Police, for fuel,. .". . . 238 20 
Appropriation for School Houses, for 

flagging, 10 50 

Reserved Fund, for labor, 5 50 



IN OCTOBER. 

Of Michael Rourke, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 65 34 

Michael Rourke, for sidewalk assess- 
ment 122 22 

Margaret Martin, for sidewalk assess- 
ment 82 01 

A. J. Philbrick, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 124 08 

Cornelius Murph}*, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 86 64 

Henry French, for sidewalk assessment, 19 74 
B. Harrison, for sidewalk assessment,. 44 70 
Adam Ort, for-sidewalk assessment,... 29 94 
Samuel Weeks, for sidewalk assessment, 179 04 
A. L. Russeil, for sidewalk assessment, 40 80 
Martha Rogers, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 246 96 

H. Parmenter, for sidewalk assessment, 105 60 
J. C. Abbott, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, .'. 168 42 

Clara A. Ware, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 19 32 



4,108 60 



Amounts carried foi-ward, $1,334 81 8130,574 44 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 41 



Amounts brought forward, ». -$1,334 81 $130,574 44 

Received for SIDEWALK ASSESS- 
MENTS, MATERIALS, AND OTHER 
STREET ACCOUNTS : 

W. T. Willis, for sidewalk assessment, 38 64 
James McCarron, for sidewalk assess- 
ment,... 67 50 

F. Carle, for sidewalk assessment, 187 68 

F. Carle, for sidewalk assessment, 60 60 

J. D. Foote, for sidewalk assessment,. . 46 68 
Mrs. P. McGuirk, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 120 18 

J. H. Drew, for sidewalk assessment,. . 86 16 

G-. W. Stanley, for sidewalk assessment, 41 76 
Heirs of Thomas Nesmith, for sidewalk 

assessment, 228 48 

J. G. Sherburne, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 51 66 

Savrina Whipple, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 18 90 

Abijah Cutter, for edgestones,. ....... 28 80 

B. G-. Mooney, for street scrapings,. . . 7 00 

Luke Veo, for street scrapings, 3 00 

F. Brown, for street scrapings, 4 00 

Francis Jewett, for coal, 84 42 

Reserved Fund, for fuel, &c, 14 00 

Appropriation for Sewers and Drains, 

for labor, 166 21 

Appropriation for Paupers, for labor, 

&c 286 96 

Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

labor, 67 85 

Appropriation for Health Account, for 

labor, 52 00 

Appropriation for Commons, for labor, 40 63 
Appropriation for Lighting Streets and 

Public Buildings, for labor, 26 95 

Appropriation for Schools, for fuel,... . 1,471 51 



4,536 38 



IN NOVEMBEE. 

Of C. F. Blanchard, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 

O. E. Mai lor}-, for sidewalk assessment, 

L. A. Butterfield, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 

Amounts carried forward, $99 84 $135,110 82 

6 



49 


50 


14 


04 


36 


30 



42 



auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $99 84 $135,110 82 

Received for SIDEWALK ASSESS- 
MENTS, MATERIALS, AND OTHER 
STREET ACCOUNTS : 

C. O'Hearn, for sidewalk assessment,. . 22 92 
W. H. Smith, for sidewalk assessment, 71 46 
H. Spiller, for sidewalk assessment, ... 33 36 
I. A. Clough, for sidewalk assessment, 104 88 
N. W. Morrill, for sidewalk assessment, 43 32 
James Bailey, for sidewalk assessment, 42 84 
G. A. Hood, for sidewalk assessment, 30 00 
F. D. Aruda, for sidewalk assessment, 50 10 
R. F. Britton, for sidewalk assessment, 30 00 
Jas. Donahoe, for sidewalk assessment, 54 00 
F. T. Wilson, for sidewalk assessment, 43 80 
John Dowling, for sidewalk assessment, 59 16 
Ann Brown, for sidewalk assessment, 10 44 
John Dodge, for sidewalk assessment, 43 26 
S. W. Churchill, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, . , 45 00 

V. Hutchinson, for sidewalk assess- 
ment 77 46 

Charles Abels, for sidewalk assessment, 37 38 

George F. Hunt, for coal, 374 43 

Thomas Downing, for edgestone, 93 75 

S. T. Dresser, for labor, 26 94 

James Carroll, for land on South High- 
land Street, 63 55 

J. C. Woodward, for stove and fuel,.. . 61 00 

N. M. Wright, for coal, 118 54 

L. G. Howe, for fuel, 46 35 

T. R. Garity , for coal, 42 83 

J. C. Woodward, for labor and fuel,. .. 256 12 

A. W. Sherman, for labor, 52 75 

Appropriation for Schools, for fuel,. . . . 711 99 
Appropriation for School Houses, for 

dirt, 5 00 

Appropriation for Paupers, for fuel,... 768 69 

Appropriation for Commons, for labor, 66 20 
Appropriation for Lighting Streets and 

Public Buildings, for labor, 16 63 

Appropriation for Sewers and Drains, 

for labor, 115 69 

Appropriation for Health Account, for 

labor, 52 00 

Amounts carried forward, $3,771 



$135,110 82 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 43 



Amounts brought forward, $3,771 68 $135,110 82 

Received for SIDEWALK ASSESS- 
MENTS, MATERIALS, AND OTHER 
STREET ACCOUNTS: 

Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

labor, 60 15 

Reserved Fund, for fuel, 965 48 



IN DECEMBER. 

Of Daniel Richardson, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 65 70 

E. A. Sanborn, for sidewalk assess- 
ment, 45 00 

Henry K. Thornton, for sidewalk as- 
sessment, 71 70 

S. T. Brown, for sidewalk assessment,. 59 64 

A. H. & J. H. Abbott, for sidewalk as- 

sessment, ... . " 23 76 

John Dennis, for sidewalk assessment,. 45 30 
E. G. Parker, for sidewalk assessment,. 30 00 
Ranlett & Plaisted, for sidewalk assess- 
ment 48 30 

Mrs. Loren Soper, for sidewalk assess- 
ment 24 84 

Mrs. J. F. Wright, for sidewalk assess- 
ment", 48 30 

H. C. & J. F. Howe, for sidewalk as- 
sessment, 135 24 

A. Churchill & L. Green, for sidewalk 

assessment, 85 02 

T. R. Garity, for labor 23 01 

B. F. Sargent, for edgestonc and labor, 134 07 

C. H. Robbins, for edgestone, 17 90 

J A. Buttrick, for street scrapings,.. . 4 00 

A. B. Buttrick, for street scrapings,. . . 5 00 

C. D. Starbird, for edgestones, 18 75 

J. C. Woodward, for fuel, 8 50 

J. F. Manahan, for street scrapings,. . 8 00 

W. B. Jones, for street scrapings,.... 2 00 

W. H. Hoyt, for edgestones, 120 00 

L. J. Eames, for resetting edgestone,. . 11 50 

S. W. Churchill, for labor, 29 59 

A. G. Cook, for street scrapings,.. .... 8 00 

Mrs. Loren Soper, for edgestones, 15 45 

George F. Penniman, for street scrap- 
ings,. , 10 00 



4,797 31 



Amounts carried forward, $1,098 57 $139,908 . l v 3 



44 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $1,098 57 $139,908 13 

Received for SIDEWALK ASSESS- 
MENTS, MATERIALS, AND OTHER 
STREET ACCOUNTS : 

B. G. Brown, for eclgestones, 100 65 

Charles H. Coburn, for edgestones,. ... 55 80 

John H. McAlvin, for coal, 86 17 

Reserved Fund, for labor and fuel,.*.. 287 00 

Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

labor, 7 00 

Appropriation for Health Account, for 

labor, 63 00 

Appropriation for Water Works, for 

engineering and labor, 728 90 

Appropriation for repairs of Public 

Buildings, for engineering and 

labor, 40 50 

Appropriation for Police, for coal,.... 201 32 

Appropriation for Paupers, for fuel,. . . ^323 10 
Appropriation for School Houses, for 

engineering and gravel, 68 50 

Appropriation for Sewers and Drains, 

for engineering, 327 00 

Appropriation for Sewers and Drains, 

for labor, 870 55 

Appropriation for Commons, for 

engineering and labor, 757 49 

Appropriation for Lighting Streets and 

Public Building, for labor, 38 35 

Appropriation for Schools, for fuel,. . . 319 50 

5,373 40 

Transferred from Reserved Fund, 20,000 00 

$165,281 53 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 45 



4,300 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid SUPERINTENDENT of STREETS 
and CIVIL ENGINEER : 

To J. C. Woodward, Superintendent of 

Streets (salary), 1,800 00 

George E. Evans, Civil Engineer 

(salary), 2,500 00 

Paid for LABOR, as per monthly pay-rolls : 

In January, 2.797 73 

February, 2.578 49 

March, 2,870 42 

April, 3,159 18 

May, 3,814 45 

June, 4,149 16 

July, 4,446 01 

August, 4,306 19 

September, • 4,222 86 

October, 4,147 98 

November, « 3,977 72 

December, 2,026 47 

Paid for HAY, GRAIN, &c. : 

To Appropriation for Paupers, for hay,. . . 216 69 

Smith Adams, for straw, 30 07 

S. Bowers, for straw, 13 87 

E. C. Baker, for hay, 148 13 

Calvin Coburn, for straw, 35 17 

Milton Fox, for hay, straw and turnips, 216 66 

A. W. Howe, for carrots, 1 29 24 

L. C. Hall, for grain and meal, 651 11 

F. B. Hawes, for oats, 131 63 

M. Knapp, for straw, 9 05 

A. Leighton, for straw, 25 30 

Little & Riley, for corn, meal and 

shorts, 208 82 

William E. Livingston, for oats, corn 

and meal, 618 88 

L. McFarlin, for hay, 336 77 

.W. H. Leavitt, for hay, 126 01 

B. G. Mooney, for straw and hajr, . ... 70 93 

Seth Gage, for hay, 660 32 

E. F. Richardson, for hay, 10 96 

Amounts carried forward, $3,639 61 $46,796 66 



42,496 66 



46 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $3,639 61 $46,796 66 

Paid for HAY, GRAIN, &c. : 

Rogers and Lord, for corn, meal and 

shorts, 512 46 

F. W. Robinson, for straw, 26 50 

H. W. Streeter, for straw 38 35 

A. & E. G. Spalding, for hay, 54 56 

Stiles, Rogers & Co., for meal, oats, 

&c., 383 72 

Stewart, Sherburne & Co., for meal and 

corn, 22 00 

S. N. Wood & Son, for meal, oats and 

salt, 505 03 

5,182 23 



Paid for LUMBER. STONE, BRICK, 
CEMENT, &c. : 

To A. L. Brooks & Co., for lumber, 10 30 

Asa Butler, for lumber, J 17 93 

Davis, Melendy & Sargent, for lumber, 15 35 

Howes & Burnham, for cbestnut posts, 60 00 

R. B. Hillman, for lumber, 3 72 

E. A. Herrick, for lumber, 2 40 

Proprietors of Locks and Canals on 
Merrimack river, for kyanizing 

lumber,... 285 86 

C. W. Saunders & Co., for lumber and 

sawing, 524 30 

H. Whitney & Co., for lumber, 1,000 85 

H. & A. Whitney, for lumber, 1 10 44 

M. Spaulding, for edgestone, 79 12 

Solomon Spaulding, for edgestone,... 347 78 

George Runels, for stone chips, 50 00 

B. Richardson, for edgestone, 417 04 

David Reed, for edgestone and flagging, 507 10 
William Reed, for bound stones, edge- 
stone and flagging, 422 32 

George F. Parker, for edgestone and 

flagging, - 370 94 

Peirce Perham, for edgestone, 178 85 

Noah Prescott, for edgestone and flag- 
ging, 2,642 83 

Benjamin Palmer, for split stone, 406 65 

William Andrews, for edgestone, 143 75 

William Bascom for edgestone, 17 85 

Amounts carried forward, $7,715 38 $51,978 89 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 



47 



Amounts brought forward, $7,715 38 $51,978 89 

Paid for LUMBER, STONE, BRICK, 
CEMENT, &c. : 

L. M. Burns, for edgestone, 325 15 

A. E. Carlton, for edgestone and flag- 
ging, 410 83 

Francis Carll, for stone, 23 00 

Joshua F. Davis, for edgestone, 122 76 

Eaton & Prescott, for edgestone and 

flagging, 73 92 

W. P. Easton, for edgestone, 200 88 

Everett Hutchinson, for edgestone and 

flagging, 235 55 

William Jones, for edgestone, 468 78 

Thomas M. King, for edgestone and 

flagging, 893 71 

Middleburgh Blue Stone Co., for stone, 171 85 

J. B. Melendy, for edgestone, 332 54 

J. Marinal, for edgestone and flagging, 281 50 

John L. Moulton, for edgestone, 18 90 

Robert Gardner, for breaking stone,. . . 543 45 

Wilder Bennett, for brick, 82 32 

Shepard Woods, for gravel, 41 34 

Stephen P. Sargent, for gravel, 73 80 

Charles W. Kimball, for sand, 112 50 

Stephen Chamberlin, for sand, 5 50 

Cheney and Tallant, for concrete, 1490 94 

E. A. & A. T. Smith, for stone paving 

and sand, 23,629 94 

E. A. & A. T, Smith, for concrete, 5,871 77 

E. P. Morong, for wood pavement,. ... 8,900 62 

N. W. Norcross, for wood pavement,. . 170 00 
Boston and Lowell, and Nashua and 
Lowell R. R. Co., for freight on 

stone, brick, &c, 874 39 

Charles D. Starbird, for gravel and 

lumber, 109 10 

53,121 02 

Paid for FUEL : 

To Bangs & Horton, for coal, 338 30 

Samuel Knight, for coal, 64 00 

William Kittredge, for coal, 18 00 

William E. Livingston, for coal, 27 22 

Sumner Sargent, for coal, 263 36 

Amounts carried forward, $710 88 $105,099 91 



48 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward $710 88 $105,099 91 

Paid for FUEL : 

Whithed & Co., for coal, 8,594 04 

Bartlett & Smith, for wood, 479 74 

Daniel Gage, for wood, 19 59 

Gage & Jones, for wood, 583 80 

Cyrus Hamlin, for wood, 164 87 

Charles D. Starbird, for wood, 2,579 83 

Samuel Bemis, for sawing wood, 16 87 

Timothy Sullivan, for sawing wood,.. 116 62 

13,266 24 

Paid for BLACKSMITH WORK, RE- 
PAIRING CARRIAGES, HARNES- 
SES, IRON, &c: 

To Archibald Wheel Co., for wheels, 173 00 

J. W. Bennett, for wagon, 175 00 

Dodge, Gilbert & Co., for hubs, spokes 

and shafts, 32 25 

M. Robbins, for painting wagons,.... 33 00 

Swett & Clark, for repairing wagon,. . 9 85 
A. M. & C. M. Wood, for hubs, spokes, 

shafts, wheels and axles, 54 40 

William Robinson, for planing and 

drilling castings, 30 25 

Ford & Kimball, for sled shoes, 43 01 

Pevey Bros, for sled shoes, &c, 4 49 

Cole & Nichols, for castings, 28 90 

Boston & Lowell and Nashua & Lowell 

R. R. Co., for freight 48 65 

Sager Ashworth, for recutting files,.,. 33 77 

John Butcher, for iron, steel, &c...... 517 50 

First National Bank, for horse nails,. . 132 00 
C. C. Thompson, for iron, steel and 

shoeing horses, 53 20 

J. A. Biabrook, for blankets, horse 

covers, and repairing harnesses, .. . 44 90 
S. L. Butman, for harnesses, collars, 

blankets, repairing harnesses, &c.,. 542 37 

M. Meaney, for horse cover, 4 50 

James Dugdale & Son, for blankets,.. . 3 00 
Appropriation for Water Works, for 

iron work, 3 52 

1,967 56 

Amount carried forioard, $120,333 71 



HO ADS AND BRIDGES. 49 



Amount brought forward, $120,333 71 

Paid for LAND AND BUILDINGS FOR 
EXTENSION OF STREETS: 

To D. W. Brown, for damage to estate 
by change of grade of Varney and 
School streets, 300 00 

Orville D. Coburn, for land taken for 

extension of South Highland street, 12 00 

Representatives of Michael J. Coleman, 
for land and buildings taken to ex- 
tend and widen Chapel street, 3,000 00 

Edward R. Fuller, for land taken to 

widen South Highland street, 140 55 

Gregoire Gosselin, for land taken for 

extension of Fulton street, 60 40 

Thomas Heathwood, for land taken for 

extension of Dover street, 497 40 

Ann Huddlestou, for land taken in the 

construction of Spencer street,. ... 256 72 

Ezekiel Lunt, for land taken in laying 

out Porter street, 134 82 

J. F. Manahan, for land taken for exten- 
sion of LeRoy street, 150 00 

James F. Noyes, Agent, for land taken 
for extension of South Highland 
street, , 389 40 

Stephen B. Puffer, for land taken for 
sidewalk on Middlesex and School 
streets, . , 40 00 

John M. G. Parker, for land taken for 

extension of Fulton street, 1,520 10 

Patrick Tiernej', for land taken in the 

construction of Spencer street,.... 589 80 

7,091 19 

Paid for DAMAGES ON EXECUTIONS, 
RESOLUTIONS AND ORDERS FROM 
COMMITTEE ON CLAIMS : 

To Catherine Gorman (on execution),... 2,707 29 

John McCarron (on execution),...... 500 25 

Idris T. Whitney (on execution), 2,673 31 

J. C. Ayer (as per resolution), , . 230 90 

John Norton (as per resolution),...,.. 500 00 

Amounts carried forward, •.»••• $6,611 75 $127,424 90 

7 



50 auditor's repobt. 



Amounts brought forward, 86,61 1 75 $1 27,424 90 

Paid for DAMAGES ON EXECUTIONS, 
RESOLUTIONS AND ORDERS FROM 
COMMITTEE ON CLAIMS : 

Daniel Bradt, for damage by overflow 

of water, 8 00 

Samuel Beck, for damage by overflow 

of water, ' 24 00 

Mary Collins, for injuries received,. . . . 125 00 

Mrs. William H. Devlin, for injuries 

received, 50 00 

Margaret Flannagan, for injuries re- 
ceived, 170 00 

Mary Mottram, for injuries, 50 00 

John McNeil, for injury to carriage,. . . 46 00 

George E. Mitchell, for injuries received 

and damage to horse and sleigh, ... 75 00 

Philip Riley and wife, for injuries re- 
ceived by Mrs. Riley, . , 100 00 

Melissa D. Whitcomb, for injuries re- 
ceived, 150 00 



7.409 75 



Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To G. S. Butters, for three horses, 910 00 

G. S. Butters, for difference in exchange 

of horses, 150 00 

G. S. Butters, for use of horses, 119 00 

J. L. Noyes, for difference in exchange 

of horses, . 337 50 

C. D. House, for medical treatment of 

horses, » 6 00 

Robert Wood, for medical treatment of 

horses, 42 00 

J. R. Hayes, for medicine for horses,. . 28 75 

C. B. Coburn & Co., for oil, spirits of 
turpentine, lead, packing, burlaps, 
brushes, axle grease, wagon springs, 
rope, blocks, twine, lanterns, brim- 
stone, baskets, &c, 128 22 

Hitch & Co., for soap, 10 50 

John C. Woodward, for cash paid for 

broom material, 6 56 

Amounts carried forward, 11,738 53 $134,834 65 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 51 



Amounts brought forward, $1,738 53 $134,834 65 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

Charles E. Adams, for hardware and 

tools, 255 87 

F. E. Bennett, for shovels, 4130 

Fielding & Bartlett, for hardware and 

tools, 178 13 

Peter Lawson, for sledge handles, 12 00 

Jacob Rogers & Co., for shovels, 20 00 

H. B. Shattuck, for saw and lines,. ... 13 60 

S. G. Mack & Co., for kettle and re- 
pairing pump, 1 25 

H. II. Wilder & Co., for repairing 

boiler, 1 00 

Rice & Co., for screen, 7 50 

Buttrick & Co., for salt, sulphur and 

mustard, 2 83 

Coburn & Smith, for salt and pitcher,. . 80 

Currier & Corey, for oil, 70 

Nichols & Fletcher, for powder, fuse, 

pail, broom, &c, . . . . * . 94 21 

R. K. Runals, for oatmeal and oil,. ... 17 64 

J V B. Richardson, for oatmeal, 1 32 

B. F. & C. E. Russell, for wicks, 1 25 

A. L. Russell, for oatmeal, pail and 

mug 4 46 

John Stiles & Co., for oatmeal, 2 00 

J. P. Folsom, for cotton, 3 25 

Folsom & Tucker, for cotton and flan- 
nel, 6 90 

A. Grover, for brands, 2 50 

H. R. Barker & Co., for gas and water 

fixtures, labor, &c, 13 71 

J. W. Murkland, for repairing engine, 

labor, &c, , . . . c 32 43 

Carey & Harris, for labor, 2 00 

Richard Dobbins, for repairing boiler, 

&c, 74 00 

Lowell Machine Shop, for jack drum,. . 30 11 

J. W. Trumbull, for filing saws, 4 70 

•J. H. Haskell, for filing saws, &c.,... . 15 30 

Josiah Gates & Sons, for scrap leather, 5 75 

Best Axle Grease and Lubricator Co., 

for axle grease, 3 28 



Amounts carried forward, $2,588 32 $134,834 65 



52 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $2,588 32 $134,834 65 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

Daniel G. Harrington, for stencil plates, 7 50 

Buff & Berger, for cleaning and adjust- 
ment of transit, 8 00 

A. L. Brooks & Co., for filing saws,. . . 4 25 

A. Bachelder & Co., for planing, 25 

Grifflin, Lake & Gordon, for turning,. . 4 95 

Henry Moulton & Co., for ladder,. ... 9 60 

M. C. Pratt & Co., for sawing and 

planing, 69 75 

Fiske & Spalding, for crayons,. ....... 50 

Mark Holms, for roller, yokes, ladder 

rounds, mauls, &c, 20 84 

William Kelley, for window, 1 50 

J. W. Bennett, for Eddy's patent collar, 5 00 

F. P. Coggeshall, for blank books, 

stationery, &c, 29 60 

Joshua Merrill & Son, for blank books, 

stationery, &c, 23 25 

George E. Evans, for cash paid for 
postage stamps, expressage, repair- 
ing tape, &c, 9 11 

H. G. Holden, for dualin and electric 

fuses 70 20 

Robert Park, for gravel, sand, use of 

derrick, tools, &c, 54 06 

A. L. Ready, for rope, 8 20 

Frances Jewett, for cash paid for enter- 
tainment of committee at Cam- 
bridge, 625 

John H. McAlvin, for cash paid for re- 
cording deed, 1 40 

Wm. Bass, for services as medical ex- 
pert and witness in case of Catherine 
Gorman vs. City of Lowell, 50 00 

Walter Burnham, for expert testimony 
in case of McCarron vs. City of 
Lowell 25 00 

Gilman Kimball, for medical attend- 
ance and services as witness in case 
of Whitney vs. City of Lowell, .... 80 00 

F. Nickerson, for expert testimony and 
advice in cases of Gorman and 
McCarron vs. City of Lowell, 70 00 



Amounts carried forward $3,147 53 $134,834 65 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 53 



Amounts brought forward, $3,147 53 $134,834 65 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

George F. Richardson, for cash paid 

witness fees, 140 94 

S. T. Wright, for services in case of 
Catherine Gorman vs. City of Low- 
ell, 15 00 

Clerk of Courts, Middlesex Co., for re- 
cording, &c, 8 00 

G. C. Blakeslee, for pump and platform, 18 50 

Jas. Meadowcroft, for repairing pump, 3 75 

H. O. Morse, for use of horse and 

carriage, 6 00 

G. W. Norris, for use of horse and 

carriage, 5 50 

Thomas P. Glover, for labor, &c, 13 40 

Mrs. Isaac Cartmell, for labor, 1 25 

Brown & Carter, for painting and letter- 
ing signs, &c, 11 00 

Fred. C. Miller, for labor moving fence, 

lumber and painting, 68 68 

H. Streeter, for nails and building fence, 9 90 

Cornelius Bresnahan, for labor, 27 38 

James Leach, for teaming, 1 50 

Michael McGuire, for labor, 7 02 

Thomas Mooney, for teaming, 30 00 

Penniman & Co.'s Express, for freight 

on wheels, 75 

F. H. Penniman, for teaming, 26 40 

William Roberts, for teaming, 1 50 

George E. Stanley, for use of horse,... 36 00 

O. A. Simpson, for stone, sand, cement, 

and labor, 664 11 

J. A. Dix, for labor on Agawam street, 150 00 
D. W. Lane, for labor and material fur- 
nished in construction of West Pine 

and Porter streets, , . . 2,688 29 

Middlesex Company, for repairing fence, 15 50 

Reserved Fund, for labor, 3 00 

Appropriation for Lighting Streets and 

Public Buildings, for oil, alcohol, &c. 5 15 

Appropriation for Water Works, for us& 

ofwater, 41100 



Amounts carried forward, $7,517 05 $134,834 65 



54 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forivard, $7,517 05 $134,834 65 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

Appropriation for Water Works, for 

pipe, labor, &c, , 23 27 

E. W. Clark, for oatmeal and oil, 4 63 

7,544 95 

* Whole expenditures for the 3 r ear,.. ..... 142,379 60 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1876, . 22,901 93 

$165,281 53 



*From this deduct the amount received for sidewalk 
assessments, fuel, labor, material, &c. 

Deduct the amount paid for land and buildings taken 
for the extension of streets, 

Deduct the amount paid for damages, on Execu- 
tions, Resolutions and Orders of Committees on 
Streets and Claims, 

Making the actual expenditure for ordinary purposes 
for Roads and Bridges, 



$41,134 54 




7,091 19 




7,409 75 


55,635 48 




$86,744 12 





RESERVED FUND. 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1875, $4,834 73 

RECEIPTS. 

Received into the Treasury : 

From Huntington Hall, for rent, 1,698 33 

From Jackson Hall, for rent, i .50 00 

From Market House Building, for rent (of 

store and cellar) , 1 ,200 00 

From Commonwealth, for rent of Armories 

for 1874, 1,200 00 

From City Government Building, for rent 

of stores, 3,840 00 

From heating stores in City Government 

Building, 60^00 

From Sj'dney Davis, Superintendent of 

City Scales, fees for weighing, ........ 742 99. 

From Sydney Davis, for fees as Measurer 

Wood and Bark, 400 05 

From City Clerk, for Marriage Certificates, 274 50 

From Cit} ? Clerk, for recording Mortgages 

and Assignments of Wages, 629 80 

From City Clerk, for sundry Licenses,. . .. 1,635 00 

From sundry persons, for costs and inter- 
est on taxes, 2,761 19 

From Albert A. Dj^ar, for costs of prepar- 
ing the estate of John H. Bean for sale 
for non-payment of taxes of 1874, ..... 3 80 

From Albert A. Dj'ar, for costs of pre- 
paring the estate of Murty Quinlan for 
sale for non-payment of taxes of 1874, 4 51 

From Albert A. Dyar, for costs of prepar- 
ing the estate of Henry Moody for sale 
for non-payment of taxes of 1874, 3 78 

From Albert A. Dyar, for costs of prepar- 
ing the estate of Amos F. Tompkins for 
sale for non-payment of taxes of 1874, 4 36 



Amounts carried forivard, $14,508 31 $4,834 73 



56 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $14,508 31 $4,834 73 

Received into the Treasury : 

Prom Albert G. Swan, for costs of prepar- 
ing^the estate of John Lund for sale for 
non-payment of taxes of 1874 3 88 

From Owen McNamara, for costs of pre- 
paring the estate of James McNamara 
for sale for non-payment of taxes of 
1874, 5 72 

From Edmund Fitzgerald, for costs of 
preparing the estate of heirs of Lyman 
Sanborn for sale for non-payment of 
taxes of 1874, 3 81 

From Albert G. Swan, for amount paid by 
him over and above the taxes and costs 
on the estate of John Lund, sold for 
non-payment of taxes of 1874, 1 50 

From Owen McNamara, for amount paid 
by him over and above the taxes and 
costs on the estate of Jas. McNamara, 
sold for non-payment of taxes of 1874, 35 63 

From Edmund Fitzgerald, for amount paid 
by him over and above the taxes and 
costs on the estate of heirs of Lyman 
Sanborn, sold for non-payment of taxes 
of 1874, 7 34 

From Albert A. Dyar, for amount paid by 
him over and above the taxes and costs 
on the estate of Amos F. Tompkins, sold 
for non-payment of taxes of 1874, 10 41 

From Mrs. P. H. Lynch, for costs of pre- 
paring her estate for sale for non-pa} r - 
ment of sidewalk assessment, 6 00 

From J. Bowers, for cost of preparing his 
estate for sale for non-payment of side- 
walk assessment, 6 00 

From J. Preston, for costs of preparing his 
estate for sale for non-payment of side- 
walk assessment, 6 00 

From William Bascom, for taxation of 
» costs in suit City vs. Bascom, 39 58 

From John H. McAlvin, City Treasurer, 

for fees for liquor licenses, 27,206 25 

From Bernard Riley, for fees for weighing 

from Oct. 1, 1874, to April 1, 1875, 32 79 

Amounts carried forward, $41,873 22 $4,834 73 



RESERVED FUND. 57 



Amounts brought forward, $41 ,873 22 $4,834 73 

Received into the Treasury : 

From Lowell Institution for Savings, for 

heating for j'ear ending July, 1875, .... 775 00 

From Lowell Institution for Savings, for 

extra labor, heating, 6750 

From William Taylor, for peddler's license, 25 00 

From A. Keene, for peddler's license,.... 25 00 

From Carter & Kenney, for coal and use 

of range, 3 50 

From Nichols & Hutchins, for use of 

range, 6 00 

From F. H. Harris, for use of range, 3 00 

From Francis Jewett, for old lumber, 12 00 

From Appropriation for Schools, for heat- 
ing, labor, &c, , 7,050 82 

From Appropriation for School Houses, for 

labor, &c, 5,112 15 

From Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 

for labor, . . 3 00 

From Appropriation for Paupers, for labor 

and material, 93 42 

From Appropriation for Police, for labor, . , 731 60 

From Appropriation for Water Works, for 

labor, 54 29 

From Appropriation for repairs of Public 

Buildings, for labor, &c, 7,529 25 

From Appropriation for Fire Department, 

for labor, heating, &c, 354 15 

From Appropriation for Health Account, 

for labor, &c, 88 74 

63,807 64 

From Cash in Treasury, unappropriated,. . 142,538 89 

$211,181 26 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for LABOR : 

To John W. Abbott, $752 13 

John Bicrgs, 917 75 

E. P. Brickett, 385 74 

George Barnes, 544 37 

John Bushee, 34 50 

Amount carried forward, $2,634 49 



58 auditor's report. 



Amount brought forward, . . . . > $2,634 49 

Paid for LABOR : 

A. R. Bunton, 158 12 

James Boyd, 45 62 

A. B. Carle, 920 00 

H. H. Carle, 232 05 

William Clifford, 836 88 

Mooers Cole, 305 00 

B. F. Carr, 240 62 

C. M. Chapman, 128 11 

Sidney Coburn, 69 69 

P. H. Carlton, 214 37 

W. G. Cleaves 156 87 

W. H. Devlin, 655 00 

John Donahoe, 657 00 

G. D. Darling, 29 75 

Charles Day, 25 87 

H. J. Foster, 369 88 

Joseph Field, 626 00 

S. D. Fuller, 332 75 

C. D. Foley, 206 25 

Eliza Freeman, 137 00 

Merritt Freeman, 17 00 

C. W. Fletcher, 107 25 

L. G. Howe, Jr., 484 44 

J. H. Hoyt, 735 37 

F. R. Hoyt, . 267 50 

A. M. Heath, 256 25 

W. O. Hanson, 228 69 

George F. Hustwick, 29332 

G. T. Hodgdon, 202 49 

George A. Hood, * 81 87 

E. H. Hemenway , 42 50 

Fred. Hemenway, 124 37 

Charles Harrison, -. 81 25 

George Jockow, 301 81 

Dennis Kohawn, 577 25 

A. W. Livermore, 572 00 

L. P. Little, 927 50 

Charles Lund, 172 25 

Gancelo Leighton, 242 50 

C. M. Leeman, 51 75 

C.F.Lane, 309 68 

J. K. Laflan, 54 37 

Job Moody, 666 00 

Amount carried forward, $1 5,778 73 



RESERVED FUND. 



59 



Amount brought forward .. , $15,778 73 

Paid for LABOR : 

John E. Morris, 87 50 

James Murch, 42 00 

John Powers, 59 00 

L. H. Quimby, 606 00 

Patrick Qninn, , 546 00 

Daniel Reynolds, 652 00 

H. E. Reynolds, 346 24 

B. A. Smith, 854 31 

John Smith, 60 00 

Alphonso Smith, 28 88 

Aaron Scadding, 419 25 

Wyatt Stevens, « 521 38 

N.'H. Sederquist, 285 75 

John Swett, 141 25 

John B. Sherman, 68 75 

G. N. Trowbridge, 402 94 

J. L. Thomson, 317 25 

R.B.Walker, 215 50 

L.J.West 53 75 

John McAleer (Engineer at City Gov- 
ernment Building), 839 00 

Warren Fletcher, Janitor, Huntington 

Hall, 860 00 

George S. Mowe, 12 00 



WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY : 

To Lowell City Guards, for firing National 
Salute, 

John Donahoe, for labor on flag-staffs, 



50 00 
4 00 



MEMORIAL DAY: 

To Post 42, Grand Army of the Republic 
(per resolution),. 



500 00 



Paid for RECEPTION OF HIS MA- 
JESTY THE KING OF THE HA- 
WAIIAN ISLANDS: 

To Chapin, Gurney & Co., for entertain- 
tainment of committee., 



23,197 48 



54 00 



500 00 



$143 00 



Amounts carried forward, $143 00 



1,751 48 



60 auditor's report. 



595 00 



100 00 



1,000 00 



• Amounts brought forward, » $143 00 $23,751 48 

Paid for RECEPTION OF HIS MA- 
JESTY THE KING OF THE HA- 
WAIIAN ISLANDS: 

To Nichols & Hutchins, for entertainment, 347 00 
S. M. Patterson & Co., for decorating 

Hall, 25 00 

George L. Huntoon, for carriages, 80 00 

FOURTH OF JULY: 

To Lowell City Guards, for firing National 

Salute, 100 00 

Paid MEASURER OF WOOD AND 
BARK, AND SUPERINTENDENT 
OF CITY SCALES : 

To Sydney Davis, Measurer (salary) 800 00 

SydneyDavis, Superintendent (salary), 200 00 

Paid WARD OFFICERS : 

To John H. Durgin, Jr., for services as 

Warden, Ward 1 , 1 874, 1 00 

T. C. Howarth, for services as Clerk, 

Ward 1, 1875, 13 00 

Andrew Collins, for services as Inspect- 
or, Ward 1, 1875, 6 00 

William Guiney, for services as In- 
spector, Ward 1 , 1875, 8 00 

William H. Hard, for services as In- 
spector, Ward 1, 1874, 6 00 

Silas O. Perry, for services as Inspect- 
or, Ward 1, 1875, 8 00 

Edwin Lamson, for services as Warden, 

Ward 2, 1875, 8 00 

Robert L. Read, for services "as Warden, 

Ward 2, 1875, 5 00 

William D. Brown, for services as 

Clerk, Ward 2, 1875, 13 00 

John S. D'Evelyn, for services as In- 
spector, Ward 2, 1875, 5 00 

Robert L. Read, for services as In- 
spector, Ward 2, 1875, 3 00 

Amounts carried forward, $85 00 $25,446 48 



RESERVED FUND. 61 



Amounts brought forward, $85 00 $25,446 48 

Paid WARD OFFICERS : 

To Edward M. Tucke, for services as In- 
spector, Ward 2, 1875, 8 00 

Daniel H. Varnum, for services as In- 
spector, Ward 2, 1875, 6 00 

E. W. French, for services as Warden, 

Ward 3, 1875, 13 00 

Arthur H. Benner, for services as Clerk, 

Warcl3, 1875, 13 00 

M. F. Brennan, for services as Inspector, 

Ward 3, 1875, 8 00 

Michael F. Clark, for services as In- 
spector, Ward 3, 1874, 6 00 

Michael F. Clark, for services as In- 
spector, Ward 3, 1875, 5 00 

Horace E. Moody, for services as In- 
spector, Ward 3, 1875, 8 00 

A. C. Russell, for services as Warden, 

Ward 4, 1875, 13 00 

Wm. Lamson, for services as Warden, 

Ward 4. 1874, 5 00 

Charles E. Carter, for services as Clerk, 

Ward 4, 1875, 13 00 

II. P. Carter, for services as Inspector, 

Ward 4, 1875, 6 00 

Abner A. Jewett, for services as In- 
spector, Ward 4, 1875, 8 00 

David Lane, for services as Inspector, 

Ward 4, 1875, 3 00 

Horace Parmenter, for services as In- 
spector, Ward 4, 1875, 2 00 

A. L. Russell, for services as Inspector, 

Ward 4, 1875, 3 00 

W. A. Fifield, for services as Warden, 

Ward 5, 1875, 13 00 

A. P. Lake, for services as Clerk, Ward 

5, 1875, 13 00 

J. W. Mitchell, for services as Inspector, 

Ward 5, 1875, 8 00 

John McQueston, for services as In- 
spector, Ward 5, 1875, 8 00 

F. B. Peabody, for services as Inspector, 

Ward 5, 1874, 6 00 

Amounts carried forward, $253 00 $25,446 48 



62 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $253 00 $25,446 48 

Paid WARD OFFICERS : 

John F. Tabor, for services as Inspector, 

Ward 5, 1875, 8 00 

Frank N. Owen, for services as Warden, 

Ward 6, 1875, 13 00 

Willis Farrington, for services as Clerk, 

Ward 6, 1875, 10 00 

Edwin Lovejoy, for services as Clerk, 

Ward 6, 1875, 3 00 

Edwin Lovejoy, for services as Inspector, 

Ward 6, 1875, ; 6 00 

Levi M. Lucas, for services as Inspector, 

Ward 6, 1875, 2 00 

Asa W. Mead, for services as Inspector, 

Ward 6, 1875 8 00 

George E. Owen, for services as In- 
spector, Ward 6, 1875,. 6 00 



309 00 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To S. G. Cressey, for ascertaining number 

of births in 1874, 29 10 

Joel Powers, for ascertaining number of 

births in 1 874, 37 80 

W. W. Read, for ascertaining number 

of births in 1874, 28 60 

Levi B. Stevens, for ascertaining num- 
ber of births in 1874, 30 30 

Francis Goward, for services canvass- 
ing and transferring names of voters 
from one ward to another, 21 00 

James Marren, for services canvassing 
and transferring names of voters 
from one ward to another, 21 00 

William W. Read, for services canvass- 
ing and transferring names of voters 
from one ward to another, 21 00 

Levi B. Stevens, for services canvass- 
ing and transferring names of voters 
from one ward to another, 21 00 

A. M. Gray, for copying census returns, 
and expenses to Boston to verify 
same, 23 00 

Amounts carried forward $232 80 $25,755 48 



RESERVED FUND. 63 



Amounts brought forward, $232 80 $25,755 48 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

James Hopkins, for copying census re- 
turns, and expenses to Boston to 
verify same, . 23 00 

James McLaughlin, for copying census 

returns, . 18 00 

Owen McNamara, for copying census 

returns 18 00 

D. S. Metealf, for copying census re- 
turns, and expenses to Boston to 
verify same, 23 00 

Joel Powers, for copying census re- 
turns, and expenses to Boston to 
verify same, ; 27 00 

D. Whithed, for copying census returns, 18 00 

Abel Coburn, for services rendered in 
obtaining the valuation of prop- 
erty, , 5 00 

Willard Coburn, for services rendered 
in obtaining the valuation of prop- 
erty, 5 00 

Bradford Marvel, for copying valuation 

books of 1874, * 200 00 

Frank R. Rix, for labor on voting lists, 27 00 

Nichols and Fletcher, for soap and 

matches, 4 65 

Alfred Barney, for basket, 2 00 

C. B. Coburn & Co., for glass, felting, 

lantern, globes, rope, twine, &c.,.. 21 31 

Jonathan Kendall, for oil, lead and 

wicking, - 3 65 

H. R. Barker & Co., for shade and 

labor, 3 00 

S. G. Mack & Co., for pail, pipe and 

labor, 6 85 

H. H. Wilder & Co., for tin file boxes, 23 00 

N. J. Wier & Co., for zinc, 1 04 

Frederick Small, for die and die brass, 3 00 

Cole and Nichols, for grate bars, 46 48 

Charles E. Adams, for nails, 6 25 

Fielding & Bartlett, for nails, 7 25 

Jacob Rogers & Co., for butts and 

screws, 46 

H. B. Shattuck, for hardware, &c.,. ... 12 73 

Amounts carried forward, $738 47 $25,755 48 



64 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $738 47 $25,755 48 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

John A. Knowles, Jr., for repairing scale, 3 00 
Fairbanks, Brown & Co., for repairing 

scale, .". 60 59 

E. O. Blake, for globes and burners,.. . 5 50 

George Thatcher, for repairing clocks, 4 25 
William E. Livingston, for cement, sand, 

brick and lime, 16 65 

A. L. Brooks & Co., for shavings, 3 00 

A. Bachelder & Co., for shavings, 3 00 

H. Whitney & Co., for lumber, 377 90 

Howes & Burnham, for lumber and 

labor, 24 10 

C. W. Saunders & Co., for lumber,... . 36 20 

D. Bruce, for ventilator, 3 00 

0. L. Cambridge, for moulding, 4 00 

Daniel Gage, for ice, 22 70 

Warren Fletcher, for curtains and wash- 
ing towels, . 41 50 

Adams & Co., for chairs, carpet lining, 

feather dusters and labor, 94 50 

A. Merriam, for settees, 42 24 

D. O. Allen, for services as Clerk of the 
Committee on Revision of the City 
Charter and Ordinances, 50 00 

Abel L. Laughton, for serving notice on 
town of Chelmsford relating to an- 
nexation to city of Lowell, 7 86 

Henry G. Gushing, Deputy Sheriff, for 
services in case of City of Lowell 
vs. McCann, > 5 48 

Clerk of Courts, Middlesex County, for 

copy of records, etc., 7 10 

David Chase, for cash paid for postage 

stamps, 3 00 

George E. Evans, for cash paid ex- 
penses of committee to Lawrence to 
examine Water Works, 18 80 

Francis Jewett, for Atlas of Middlesex 
County, and expenses of sundry 
committees, . . . . r 103 23 

John H. McAlvin, for cash paid for pos- 
tage stamps, postal cards, pens, 
repairing stamp, etc.,. ... 180 54 

Amounts carried forward, $1,856 61 $25,755 48 



RESERVED FUND. 65 



Amounts brought forward, $1,856 61 $25,755 48 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

Samuel A. McPhetres, for cash paid for 
copy City Charter, postage stamps, 
and expressage, 36 70 

John H. Nichols, for cash paid for post- 
age stamps, rent of box in Post 
Office, telegrams, matches, express- 
age, labor cleaning City Govern- 
ment Building, soap, etc., 97 75 

F. P. Coggeshall, for blank books, sta- 

tionery, etc., 134 30 

Bacheller, Dumas and Co., for blank 

books, etc., 25 45 

Henry C. Church, for blank books, sta- 
tionery, etc., 86 64 

Joshua Merrill & Son, for directories, 

stationery, etc., 112 60 

S. S. Scranton, for copy " Rights of 

City," 4 50 

Sampson, Davenport & Co., for maps 

of city of Lowell, 19 80 

N. C. Sanborn, for plans of Hunting- 
ton Hall, 30 00 

J. P. Folsom, for stand cover, 1 25 

Folsom & Tucker, for towels, • 7 00 

French & Puffer, for ewer and basin, 
spittoons, soap, dishes and tumb- 
lers, ..« 17 25 

Edward McEnniss, for soap, 5 30 

Offutt & Whitaker, for lamps and wicks, 90 

J. & J. M. Pearson, for soap, 1 21 

Nichols &Hutchins, for refreshments,. . 116 00 

C. P. Talbot & Co., for copperas, 1 68 

L. G. Gilson, for use of sleigh, &c.,.. . 16 50 

G. L. Huntoon, for use of wagon and 

sleigh, , 13 00 

H. O. Morse, for horse and carriage 

hire, 59 00 

George W. Norris, for horse and car- 
riage hire, ; 66 00 

N. A. Ranlett, for use of horse and 

wagon, 4 00 

Hatch & Littlefield, for boxes, 13 50 

Amounts carried forward, $2,726 94 $25,755 48 



66 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $2,726 94 $25,755 48 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

Penniman & Co.'s Express, for trans- 
portation, 6 05 

Sargent & Co.'s Express, for transpor- 
tation, 8 40 

Benjamin Franklin, for labor in burying 

ground , 6 00 

John Huntley, for labor in burying 

ground, 82 50 

George Harris, for labor in burying 

ground, 26 32 

O. N. Huse, for labor in burying ground, 151 50 

Warren Fletcher, for cash paid for saw- 
dust, soap and labor, 58 40 

James C. Blakeslee, for pump and tub 

at burying ground, 16 13 

F. A. Durant, for mason work, 8 75 

Peter Buckman, for lumber, 5 50 

William Roberts, for teaming, 6 25 

O. A. Simpson, for teaming, 32 50 

Moses H. Swett, for stone posts, 110 00 

E. H. Lord, for analyzing milk, 3 00 

Cumraiskey & Lennon, for use of Fair 

Grounds for military companies, . . 60 00 

Lowell City Guards, for firing minute 
guns on the occasion of the funeral 
of Vice President Wilson, 80 00 

Alfred Gilman & Son, for repairing 

flags, 7 00 

Middlesex Mechanics' Association, for 

use of hall for conventions, 20 00 

Boston & Lowell and Nashua & Lowell 
Railroad Company, for rent of land 
on Merrimack and Dntton streets, 
occupied by Huntington and Jack- 
son Halls, 500 00 

Appropriation for Schools, for pails, 

brooms, mats, mop handles, etc.,. . 17 16 

Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 

for fuel , 3,775 27 

Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 
for surveying city boundary lines, 
setting bounds, labor, etc., 792 96 

Amounts carried fonoard, $8,495 63 $25,755 48 



RESERVED FUND. 67 



Amounts brought forward, $8,495 63 $25,755 48 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

Appropriation for Police, for services 
of officers at Huntington Hall and 
Peoples' Club Room, 74 25 

Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

labor, 3 75 

Appropriation for Water Works, for 
use of water at City Government 
Building, Jackson Hall, Armories, 

and City Carpenter Shop, 275 59 

8,849 22 

Whole expenditure for the year, 34,604 70 

ABATEMENT OF TAXES : 

For taxes of 1873, abated by the Asses- 
sors before collection, 6,008 93 

For taxes of 1874, abated by the Assessors 

before collection, 275 50 

6,284 43 



TRANSFERS : 

Transferred, to Appropriation for Roads 

and Bridges, 20,000 00 

Transferred to Appropriation for Paupers, 4,000 00 
Transferred to Appropriation for Police,. . 5,000 00 
Transferred to Appropriation for Fire De- 
partment, , 2,000 00 

Transferred to Appropriation for Lighting 

Streets and Public Buildings, 2,000 00 

Transferred to Appropriation for Salaries, 1,000 00 
Transferred to Appropriation for Water 

Works, 110,000 00 

Transferred to Appropriation for City 

Debt, 510 53 

Transferred to Appropriation for Repairs 

of Public Buildings, 2,000 00 



146,510 53 



187,399 66 
Balance undrawn January 1, 1876, 23,781 60 

$211,181 26 



PAUPERS. 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1875, 5,285 35 

Appropriated and assessed in 1875, 17,000 00 

RECEIPTS. 

Received into the Treasur} 7 on account of 
Paupers : 

From City of Boston, for aid rendered 
Thomas McDermott, W. W. Whitcomb, 
H. Stewart, Amos L. Cook, Mary Mur- 
phy, Margaret Murphy, Bridget Breen 
and Mary Johnson, and support of boys 
at Reform School, 118 46 

From City of Cambridge, for aid rendered 

Michael Mehan and Mary Kershaw, .... 85 72 

From City of Chelsea, for support of bo}'s 

at Reform School, 51 7 36 

From Cit}' of Haverhill, for aid rendered 

Martha J. Poor, 52 00 

From City of Fitchburg, for aid rendered 

Catherine Lawless, 37 00 

From City of Lawrence, for aid rendered 
Dennis Harman, Charles Knapp, Joseph 
A. Weeks, Mary Kelley and Elizabeth 
Knott, 267 00 

From City of New Bedford, for aid ren- 
dered A. T. Smith, 16 00 

From City of Newburyport, for aid ren- 
dered A. L. Shute, < 10 00 

From City of Salem, for aid rendered E. 

C. Coughlin, 6 00 

From Town of Bridgewater, for aid ren- 
dered J. Quinn, 37 00 

From Town of Burlington, for aid rendered 

Nancy M. Travis,. . . : 15 00 

From Town of Chelmsford, for aid rendered 

Richard Mealey and Philip Whalen,. . . 62 00 



22,285 35 



Amounts carried forivard, $1,223 54 $22,285 



PAUPERS. 69 



Amounts brought forward, $1,223 54 $22,285 35 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
Paupers : 

From Town of Concord, for aid rendered 

Elizabeth Howe, -. 33 00 

From Town of Danvers, for aid rendered 

Ann M. Welch and children, 460 29 

From Town of Dracut, for support of J. 

Kittredge, 97 50 

From Town of Groton, for aid rendered 

Allen Baker, 23 00 

From Town of Manchester, for aid rendered 

Ann Quinn, 30 00 

From Town of Milford, for aid rendered 

Margaret Quinn 70 00 

From Town of Natick, for aid rendered E. 

Witherell, 99 72 

From City of Somerville, for aid ren- 
dered J. J. Liddell, 66 29 

From Town of Pembroke, for aid rendered 

Sarah Ford, 5 00 

From Town of Salisbur}', for aid rendered 

John Thorn, 29 00 

From Town of Somerset, for aid rendered 

Francis Drum, 23 00 

From Town of Tewksbury, for aid rendered 

A. McDonald, 17 00 

From Town of Watertown, for aid ren- 
dered Catherine Kerwin, 42 50 

From Town of Wej'mouth, for aid ren- 
dered Hannah Handley, 9 00 

From Town of Winchester, for support of 

boys at Reform School, 51 15 

From Town of Woburn, for aid rendered 
M. O'Connors, E. Shea, L. Loob}*, and 
support of boys at Reform School, 184 77 

From Commonwealth, on account of State 

Paupers 620 16 

From Tempest Hellewell, for board of 
Susanna Hellewell at the Worcester In- 
sane Asylum, 142 90 

From Isaac N. Fitts, for board of W. L. 

Fitts at the Worcester Insane Asylum,. . 149 61 

From Charles H. Knowles, for board of 
Charles V. Knowles at the State Lunatic 
Hospital at Northampton, 140 88 

Amounts carried forward, $3,518 31 $22,285 35 



70 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $3,518 31 $22,285 35 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
Paupers : 

From John Ray, on account of board of 

Mary Ann Ray at State Lunatic Hospital 

at Worcester, 15 99 

From William Kittredge, for board of J. 

Kittredoe, 130 35 

From L. Phelps, for board of T. Cotter,.. . 29 14 

From Francis Jewett, on account of support 

of Robert McCann, after deducting the 

amount due Ann Sexton, daughter of 

said McCann, , 671 77 

From Francis Jewett, for care of Bridget 

Ryan at the Almshouse, 5 88 

From E. S. Hunt, for board of E. S. Hunt 

at House of Correction, 25 43 

From J. N. Hoar, for amount due him on 

draft of 1874, refused, 75 

From Fiske and Spalding, for paint and oil, 34 26 

From Whithead & Atherton, for amount of 

note of Hanover Dickey, dated July 30, 

1855, and interest due on same, 345 25 

From Lorenzo Phelps, for sales from farm, 2,225 30 
From Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 

for hay, 216 69 

From Appropriation for Fire Department, 

for hay, 227 41 

7,446 53 

Transferred from Reserved Fund, 4,000 00 

$33,731 88 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Lorenzo Phelps, Superintendent of the 

Almshouse and Farm, 1,500 00 

William A. Lang, Chaplain and Teacher 

of Reform School, 1,300 00 

Nicholas Pierce, for labor, 400 00 

John P. Eaton, for labor, 405 00 

H. S. Phillips, for labor, 297 00 

Richard B. Tobie, for labor, 360 00 

Maria L. Mooney, for labor, , 260 00 

Amount carried forward, $4,522 00 



PAUPER?. 71 



Amount brought foriuard, $4,522 00 

Expenditures : 

Charlotte Kitchen, for labor, 145 50 

Ella Wright, for labor, 126 00 



Paid for GROCERIES, GRAIN, MEAT, 
&c, USED AT THE ALMSHOUSE : 

To Coggin, Kidder & Co., for flour, 444 63 

William E. Livingston, for meal and 
shorts, 

Stiles, Rogers & Co., for flour and meal, 

Samuel N. Wood & Son, for meal and 
shorts, 

Litchfield & Co., for beans, 

Martin Morris, for flour, crackers and 
baking, 

S. A. Scripture & Co., for flour, crackers 
and baking, 

Charles A. Bailey, for beef, 

Michael Corbett, for beef, 

I. M. Chase, for beef, 

Daniel S. Gray, for provisions, 

Hunt & Wilder, for salt, &c.,. 

Foster Nowell, for poultry, 

Richardson Bros., for beef, 

E. C. Rice, for provisions, 

J. A. G. Richardson, for provisions,... 

J. L. Sargent & Co., for beef, 

E. F. Wilder & Co., for provisions,. ... 

A. F. Wright & Co., for beef and poul- 
try, 

Samuel G. Davis & Co., for fish, 

Knowles, Freeman & Co., for fish, 

Coburn & Smith, for salt, 

* William Caklerwoocl, for tobacco, etc., 

Ela & Page, for groceries, '. 

Nichols & Fletcher, for groceries, 

R. Simpson, for coffee, 

H. W. Streeter, for groceries, 

Wadley, Andrews & Co., for molasses, 

J. Henry Read, for cider, 

H. S. Perham, for making cider, 



43 


10 


422 


19 


109 


58 


126 


25 


1,029 


50 


27 


90 


249 


64 


91 


60 


214 


56 


16 


20 


23 


80 


21 


45 


116 


05 


94 


17 


165 


32 


162 


11 


169 


62 


21 


87 


279 


49 


3 


25 


158 


72 


55 


92 


106 


59 


63 


48 


50 


70 


315 


75 


6 


00 


5 


40 



4,793 50 



Amounts carried forward, $5,352 29 $4,793 50 



n 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Paid for GROCERIES, GRAIN, MEAT, 
&c, USED AT THE ALMSHOUSE : 

Boston & Lowell and Nashua & Lowell 
Railroad Company, for freight on 
molasses, , 

Boston & Maine Railroad, for freight 
on fish, 

S. Harnden, for fish, 



,352 29 $4,793 50 



9 63 

55 
9 96 



5,372 43 



Paid for GROCERIES FURNISHED 
SUNDRY PERSONS ON ORDERS 
FROM THE OVERSEERS OF THE 
POOR : 

To V. Burrows, 3 00 

Charles Callahan, 3 00 

F. H. Chandler, 60 00 

Coburn & Smith, 13 97 

Gibson Brothers, 15 00 

Greenwood Brothers, 3 00 

Miller Brothers, 4 00 

William McAloon, 3 00 

Nichols & Fletcher, 30 98 

F. E. Putnam & Co., 3 00 

A. D. Puffer & Co., 9 48 

J. B. Richardson 6 00 

R. K. Runals, 16 01 

Ranlett & Plaisted, 5 00 

Russell & Cheney, 6 00 

A. L. Russell, 3 00 

J. W. Smith, « 46 00 

Stickney & Spofford, 7 00 

C. E. Sborey & Co., 3 00 

John Stiles & Co., 2 00 

Harrison W. Streeter, 3 00 

Worthen & Coburn, 24 60 

E. B. Worthen, 2 00 

A. C. Wright & Co., 6 00 

I. W. Whittemore, 18 45 

^_ 296 49 

Amount carried forward, $10,462 42 



PAUPERS. 73 



Amount brought forward, $10,462 42 

Paid for NURSING AND BOARDING 
PERSONS OUT OF THE ALMS- 
HOUSE : 

To Commonwealth of Massachusetts, for 
support of Eliza Perry, Susan 
Morey, Kate Glancy, Edward Kee- 
nan, Maurice Dunleaiy, George 
Connell and Margaret Connors, .. . 215 93 

St. John's Hospital, for board and medi- 
cal attendance of Catherine Hallacy, 
Thomas Doyle, Patrick O'Day, John 
Crowley, Mary Sullivan, 181 71 

Hospital for the Insane (Northampton), 

for support of Charles V. Knowles, 190 03 

Taunton Lunatic Hospital, for support 
of Charles R. Watts, Michael Sulli- 
van, John Garmon, Enoch Lewis 
and John Conant, 826 89 

Worcester Lunatic Hospital, for support 
of Caroline M. Prescott, Louisa 
Parker, Joseph Carpenter, Laurena 
Boorne, Josephine B. McCarty, B 
Angie A. Brown, Mary Casey, Ellen 
Golden, Michael Welch, Nancy Pea- 
body, Elizabeth Gibbons, Susannah 
Hellewell, George T. Lawrence, 
Roxanna Putnam, George Connell, 
Eliza Perry, Margaret Connors, 
Maurice Dunleary, James Hojde, 
Nathan C. Morse, Rachel Robert- 
son and Margaret Harrington, 3,436 47 

State Reform School (Westborough), 
for keeping Edward Butterfleld, Ed- 
ward Follen, Patrick Flannagan, 
Albert Johnson, Charles H. Lovett, 
Matt McCormick, Ed. H. Wyman, 
Fred A. Keizer and Richard Robin- 
son, 162 12 

State Industrial School for Girls (Lan- 
caster), for support of Lizzie A. 
Durivage, Rachael Hay, Emma 
Spooney, Delia Conley, Mary Ann 
McDonough, Mary Ann Garrity 
and Anis Doe, 86 35 



Amounts carried forward, $5,099 50 $10,462 42 

10 



74 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $5,099 50 $10,462 42 

Paid for NURSING AND BOARDING 
PERSONS OUT OF THE ALMS- 
HOUSE : 

To C. J. Adams, for support of prisoners in 
the House of Correction (Middle- 
sex County), 116 57 

City of Boston, for aid rendered John 
Callahan, Robert Gannon, Patrick 
Garrity, Bridget Gallagher, James 
Hunt, Thomas Mooney, Michael T. 
McNamara, Bridget O'Brien, Jo- 
anna O'Sullivan, Catherine Sexton, 
Sarah Shehan, Hannah K. Stevens, 
Joanna Stevens, George H. Shep- 
ard and burial of wife, George B. 
Wood, Gerald Shanley, Elizabeth 
Williams, Daniel Crowley, Thomas 
O'Riley, James L. Hanson, Mary 
E. Oakes, Patrick Purcell, Eliza- 
beth Kenniston, Eliza Kenniston, 
burial of John C. Crowley, Nathan- 
iel Lew, Mary Shanley, Patrick 
Welsh, burial of Hook child, Mar- 
garet Buchanan, Mary Brown, Ca- 
milo Bravo, James J. Crowley, Jesse 
T. Oakley, John Riley, James 
Smith, Charles Williams, Thomas 
B. Pierce, John Rogers and Edward 
Fallon 1,590 38 

City of Cambridge, for aid rendered 
Benjamin Wilde, James Dailey, 
Henry Quinn and Sarah E. Chip- 
man, 76 49 

City of Chelsea, for aid rendered Eve- 
lyn Clapp and Mary E. Oakes,. ... 52 40 

City of Fall River, for aid rendered 
Mary Spotwood, Mary Connelly 
and family, and George M. Glover, 55 80 

City of Fitchburg, for aid rendered Mrs. 

McDonald, , 85 00 

City of Haverhill, for aid rendered Frank 

'Carr and Mrs. Oceonna Taylor, 294 1 2 

Essex County House of Correction, for 

the support of John F. Glynn, 1 8 42 

Amounts carried forward $7,388 68 $10,462 42 



PAUPERS. 75 

Amounts brought forward, $7,388 68 $10,462 42 

Paid for NURSING AND BOARDING 
PERSONS OUT OF THE ALMS- 
HOUSE : 

To City of Lawrence, for aid rendered Ar- 
thur P. Killen, Mrs. Michael Brad- 
ley, Julia Kelcone, Thomas Mougan, 
James Driscoll, Charles W. Keyser, 
J. W. McDonald, Michael Sangan, 
Mrs. Norman Leslie, William Heff- 
eron and Frank Hewing, 95 10 

City of Lynn, for aid rendered Nellie C. 
Mower, Mrs. Samuel C. Morey and 
Edwin G. Howe, 148 99 

City of Springfield, for aid rendered 

Hosea Q. Davis and family, 29 85 

City of Worcester, for aid rendered 

* Patrick Behan, 103 20 

Town of Abington, for aid rendered 

John W. Willard and wife, 23 98 

Town of Beverly, for aid rendered A. 

W. Montcalm, 118 44 

Town of Dighton, for aid rendered Ed- 
ward Fitzgerald and family, 51 13 

Town of North Brookfield, for aid ren- 
dered Bridget Coughlin and family, 40 11 

Town of Sutton, for aid rendered Michael 

O'Brien, 28 81 

Town of Woburn, for aid rendered Peter 

O'Riley, 48 89 

Town of Westford, for aid rendered H. 

W. Boyden, 29 50 

Mrs. N. G. Bennett, for board and 

nursing of C. Morgan,, 116 95 

Cynthia J. Brown, for board and nursing 

of Mrs. Judith Edds, -. 12 00 

Mary L. Copp, for board and nursing of 

Anna Wade, 49 97 

Thomas Donohoe, for board of Michael 

Daily, 28 00 

W. P. Ellis, for board of Sam'l Randall, 117 32 

Mary A. Gibbin, for nursing Margaret 

Reynolds, 3 00 

Mrs. Betsey Hodge, for board of Mary 

L. Copp, while nursing Anna Wade, 2 25 

Amounts carried forward, $8,436 17 $10,462 42 



76 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, &8,436 17 $10,462 42 

Paid for NURSING AND BOARDING 
PERSONS OUT OF THE ALMS- 
HOUSE : 

To Francis Jewett, for cash paid to Charles 
Bebee for assistance rendered Lewis 
Lunt, 3 00 

Charles Knapp, for monthly assistance 

in cash, 144 00 

B. F. Libbey, for board and nursing of 

Nellie Loyd, 6 43 

Sarah A. Proper, for board and aid ren- 
dered Ella D. Witherell, 99 72 

Margaret Quinn, for monthly assistance 

in cash, 60 00 

Mrs. S. P. Stiles, for board of George 

H. Stewart and wife, 4 00 

Mrs. K. Williamson, for board of Anna 

Wade, 4 50 

J. F. Puffer, for furniture delivered to 

Patrick Gillespie, 10 00 

A. W. Buttrick, for professional services, 7 00 

J. H. Gilman, for professional services, 2 00 

Hermon J. Smith, for professional ser- 
vices and medical attendance,..^ 192 40 

G. E. Pinkham, for professional services, 1 00 

8,970 22 



Paid for CLOTHING, DRY GOODS, 
BOOTS, SHOES, LEATHER, &c. : 

To William P. Brazer & Co., for mittens 
and hats, 

J. P. Folsom, for dry goods,. 

Folsom & Tucker, for dry goods, ...... 

H. Hosford & Co., for dry goods, 

Keyes & Wightman, for dry goods, . . . 
Marin & McCormick, for dry goods,. . 

Putnam & Son, for caps, 

William Walker & Co., for cloth, 

F. H. Hardy, for cloth, . . 

L. V. Randall, for boots and shoes,.. . 

D. Swan, for boots,. > 

H. Wright & Co., for rubbers, 

D. L. Dimock, for leather and findings, 

1,003 37 

Amount carried forward, $20,436 01 



33 


00 


125 


98 


66 


12 


64 


97 


50 


07 


138 


42 


37 


50 


140 


93 


98 


62 


6 


00 


1 


35 


1 


25 


239 


16 



PAUPERS. 77 



Amount brought forward, $20,436 01 

Paid for COFFINS, INTERMENTS, etc. : 

To J. W. Brooks, 130 55 

J. B. Currier, 40 50 

Terrance Hanover, 200 00 

C. B. Coburn & Co., for shellac, etc... . 4 50 

Jonathan Kendall, for shellac,. ....... 4 00 

Reserved Fund, for labor making cof- 
fins, 93 42 

— 472 97 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To Joseph H. Smith, for examinations of 

cases of insanity, 12 00 

Charles A. Savory, for medical attend- 
ance and consultation with Dr. J. 
H. Smith 5 00 

Albert M. Gray, for expenses incurred 
investigatiug cases of paupers and 
making report to Board of State 
Charities, 46 50 

John P. Eaton, for expenses incurred 

investigating cases of paupers,. .... 17 05 

Francis Jewett, for cash paid expenses 
of committee to Worcester and 
tickets to Boston and return, 55 90 

Lorenzo Phelps, for expenses incurred 

investigating cases of paupers,.... 25 03 

John H. Nichols, for railroad fares, etc., 82 27 

C. B. Coburn & Co., for alcohol, lead, 
varnish, oil, window cord, glass, 
paint, shellac, whiting, etc., 143 98 

Fisk & Spalding, for grease, oil, lead 

and shellac, 11 90 

A. P. Quimby, for labor, painting, 

putty, whiting, etc 30 71 

Charles E. Adams, for hardware, 2 33 

Fielding & Bartlett, for hardware and 

seeds, 1 18 20 

Horace B. Shattuck, for hardware,.... 2 12 

N. J. Wier & Co., for stoves, stove 

pipe, pails, etc., 47 80 

S. G. Mack & Co., for grates, boilers, 

pipe, labor, etc., , 94 58 

Rice & Co., for wire cloth, 6 00 



Amouids carried forward, $701 37 $20,908 98 



78 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $701 37 $20,908 98 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To T. Costello & Co., for lead pipe, repair- 
ing stoves, plumbing, &c., 66 75 

John C. Bennett, for repairing wringer, 5 00 
Wallingford & Callahan, for furnace, 

tin pipe, &c., 159 45 

H. H. Wilder & Co., for pump, pipe, 

milk cans, coal hods, &c, 29 24 

Dodge, Gilbert & Co., for hubs, &c.,.. . 5 00 

J. S. Shed, for plough points, 3 08 

M. V. B. Libbey, for horse shoeing,.. , . 54 75 
J. A. Brabrook, for whips, straps, 
sponge, collar, repairing harnesses, 

&c, 53 90 

George H. Convers, for repairing car- 
riages, &c.,. . 7 75 

A. L. Brooks, for lumber, 24 99 

A. Bachelder & Co., for door and door 

frames, ^ . . . . 6 00 

Howes & Burnham, for lumber, «, 67 34 

William Kelley, for windows and doors, 17 70 

M. C. Pratt & Co., for sawing, 75 

C. W. Saunders & Co., for lumber 324 97 

H. Whitney & Co., for lumber, 25 80 

E. W. Hall & Co., for fireworks, 1115 

E. G. Parker, for bean poles and apples, 13 00 
William E. Livingston, for lime, cement 

and plaster, 26 20 

William Kittredge, for coal, 23 00 

Alfred Barney, for baskets, brooms, pails, 

brushes, wash-boards, &c, 44 48 

Benner Bros., for sofa, 8 00 

French and Puffer, for wicks, chimnies, 

burners, lantern, &c, 8 21 

H. A. & S. A. Coburn, for horse and 

cow, . . . , 280 00 

F. H. Butler & Co , for drugs and med- 

icine, * 13 30 

C. E. Kimball, for drugs and medicine, 11 85 
C. P. Talbot & Co., for copperas and 

chloride lime, 6 20 

Brown & Chase, for printing, 14 25 

F. P. Coggeshall, for school books, 

blank books and stationery, 48 13 

Amounts carried forward, $2,061 61 $20,908 98 



PAUPERS. 79 

Amounts brought forward, $2,061 Gl $20,908 98 

Pair! for SUNDRIES : 

To Henry C. Church, for stationery, 2 38 

S. Horn & Co., for scraps, 29 97 

D. Gage, for ice, 17 54 

Samuel N. Wood & Son, for grass seed, 32 84 

J. C. Ayer & Co., for liquor barrels,. . 6 00 

H. O. Morse, for carriage hire,. , 8 00 

G. W. Norris, for carriage hire, 25 50 

J. H. Haskell, for filing saws, 5 50 

Drew & Harper, for supper for police 

and guests, , 65 00 

Nichols & Hutchins, for refreshments, 

use of ware, etc., 126 35 

D. Bruce, for ventilators, 10 00 

Clerk of Courts, Middlesex County, for 

copying papers, 8 40 

Henry J. McAlvin, for making out 
State pauper bills and recording 
same, ». 3 66 

George Thatcher, for cleaning and re- 
pairing clocks, 5 00 ] 

C. W. Fletcher, for labor on State pau- 
per burial bills, 4 50 

Henry S. Phillips, for labor, 21 25 

William H. True, for labor whitewash- 
ing, 100 00 

Joseph S. Brown, for services in taking 

account of stock, etc., at City Farm, 5 00 

L. R. J. Varnum, for services in taking 

account of stock, &c, at City Farm, 5 00 

C. A. Welsh, for services in taking ac- 
count of stock, &c, at City Farm, 
and recording same, . . , 10 00 

Town of Chelmsford, for taxes, ....... 55 20 

Appropriation for Fire Department, for 
manure, wool-waste, and filling re- 
servoirs, 149 50 

Appropriation for Repairs of Public 
Buildings, for lumber and nails 
used at the Mattox House in Ayer's 
City, ". . . . 4-35 

Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 

for fuel at City Farm, , . . . 577 19 

Amounts carried fonvard, $3,339 74 $20,908 98 



80 auditor's report. 

Amounts brought forward, $3,339 74 $20,908 98 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 
for fuel, on orders from Overseers of 

the Poor 3,363 00 

Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 

for manure, blacksmith work, &c.,, . 258 57 

Reserved Fund, for labor, • • 1 38 

6,962 69 



Whole expenditure for the year, 27,871 67 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1876, 5,860 21 

$33,731 88 



POLICE. 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1875, $13,283 03 

Appropriated and assessed in 1875,.. 48,000 00 

, $61,283 03 

RECEIPTS. 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
Police : 

From Samuel P. Hadley, Clerk of the Po- 
lice Court, for services of police officers, 
fines and costs in city ordinance cases, 
etc., 2,870 85 

From William H. Clemence, City Marshal, 

for services of police officers, . , 2,670 44 

From County of Middlesex, for rent of 

Police Court Rooms for 1874, 500 00 

From Town of Leominster, for police but- 
tons, 8 83 

From Appropriation for Schools, for ser- 
vices of police officers, ' 131 08 

From Appropriation for Repairs of Pub- 
lic Buildings, for services of police offi- 
cers, 30 25 

6,211 45 

Transferred from Reserved Fund, 5,000 00 

72,494 48 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid William H. Clemence, City Marshal 

(salary), 1,800 00 

Paid Nathan Crosby, Police Justice, in 

truant cases (salary), 100 00 

1,900 00 

Amount carried forward, $1 ,900 00 

11 



82 auditor's report. 



Amount brought forward, SI, 900 00 

Paid for SERVICES OF POLICE OFFI- 
CERS : 

To Jacob G. Favor, Deputy Marshal, ... . 1,179 75 
Tbeophilus C. Blaisdell, Captain of the 

Night Police, 1,186 25 

Otis Bullard, 928 14 

Andrew Blood, 1,003 75 

Allen P. Bickford,. 979 00 

Levi Brown, 877 26 

Squire L. Bailey, 1,007 88 

John Buchanan, ...... 880 01 

William H. Adams, 23 38 

William L. Clark, 1,046 39 

Charles F. Cooper, - 1,035 39 

John Callahan, 922 66 

James Crowley, 842 43 

Daniel Crane, 734 27 

Thomas Cunningham, 125 13 

Alfred Day, 1,014 76 

John Dougherty, 1,042 26 

Moses Davenport, 13 75 

AsaF. Esty, 976 26 

Harrison H. Fuller, 996 89 

Augustus B. Foss, 1,014 76 

William P. Farrington,. 928 15 

Henry Farrington, 1,045 02 

Michael Flynn, - 122 39 

David H. Goodhue, 990 00 

Frank Goodwin, 1,012 02 

Henry Garrison, 1,045 01 

Jerome B. Gilbert, 906 16 

Charles Howard, 1 ,042 26 

Daniel Hayes, 1 ,043 64 

S. B. Harris, 339 63 

Thomas Ingalls, 935 00 

Patrick Kelley, 1,046 40 

A. E. Libby, 996 89 

Isaac L. Libby, 968 01 

Charles C. Langley, 1,002 38 

William M. Lee, .. 994 14 

Orrison Lewis, 60 51 

William H. Lovejoy, 54 55 

William M. Locke, 24 76 

Frank N. Miles, 979 00 

Amounts carried forward, $33,366 29 Si ,900 00 



POLICE. 83 



Amounts brought forward, $33,366 29 $1,900 00 

Paid for SERVICES OF POLICE OFFI- 
CERS : 

To John A. Meloy, 902 00 

Benjamin G. Mooney, 979 01 

John F. McCaffrey 863 52 

Frank McQuadc, 860 76 

Mason W. Presby, 1,054 64 

Alonzo Page, 980 38 

Albert Pindar, 239 26 

John II. Ring, 824 10 

D. C. Robinson 817 22 

Thomas J. Sanborn, 1,029 89 

Daniel H. Sinclair, 929 51 

Jacob R. Smith 13 75 

Frank T. Thissell, 919 89 

John W. Tilton, 1,067 02 

Hermon N. Tilton, 908 89 

Henry M. Thompson, 24 75 

Alden A. Usher, 187 02 

Luke Veo, 1,034 00 

Thomas Walsh, 375 38 

Joseph R. Welch, 562 38 

James E. Webster, 1,014 78 

Levi H. Witham, 998 26 

Peter Watson, . . 5 50 

Stephen L. Young, 1,013 39 



Paid for SPECIAL POLICE SERVICE : 

To William H. Adams, . 1100 

J.A.Brown,.. 8 25 

J. C. Blakeslee, 11 00 

C. E. Cummings, 8 25 

T. Cunningham, 6 88 

B. B. Dunbar, 8 25 

W. T. Eldridge, 11 00 

S.B.Harris, 38 50 

S. D. Holmes, 8 25 

I. B. Knapp, 11 00 

William M. Locke, 11 00 

Edward Lavelle, . 8 25 

H.G.Mitchell, 8 25 

R. E. Norton, 11 00 

S. O. Morse, 8 25 



50,971 59 



Amounts carried forward,. $169 13 $52,871 59 



34 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Paid for SPECIAL POLICE SERVICE 

To Levi Palmer, 

C. W. Pillsbury, 

A. M. Robinson, 

L. Ramsdell, 

J. R. Smith, 

C. J. Shackford, 

W. S. Thissell 

H. M. Thompson, 

C. F. Urann, 

F. A. Wallace, :... 

Paid for SPECIAL POLICE FOR 
FOURTH OF JULY, 1875 : 

To William H. Adams, 

J. A. Brown, 

G. C. Blakeslee, 

Thomas Cunningham, 

Moses Davenport, 

B. B. Dunbar, 

I. B. Knapp, 

William M. Locke, 

E. Lavelle, 

S. O. Morse, , . ... ... 

H. G. Mitchell, 

Levi Palmer, 

A. M. Robinson, 

Chester E. Ryder, 

J. R. Smith, 

C. J. Shackford, * 

H. M. Thompson, 

W. S. Thissell, 

C. F. Urann, 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To C. B. Coburn & Co., for rent of Police 
Court Rooms to October 1st, 1875, 
S. L. Bailey, for conveyance of prison- 
ers to House of Correction, travel- 
ing expenses, telegrams, etc., 

W. H. Clemence, for traveling expenses, 
telegraphing, etc., 

Amounts carried forward, 



1169 13 $52,871 59 



5 


50 


9 


63 


6 


88 


2 


75 


11 


00 


8 


25 


8 


25 


11 


00 


8 


25 


6 


88 



5 


50 


5 


50 


5 


50 


5 


50 


5 


50 


5 


50 


5 


50 


5 


50 


5 


50 


5 


50 


5 


50 


5 


50 


5 


50 


5 


50 


5 


50 


5 


50 


5 


50 


6 


88 


5 


50 



487 50 

94 12 
11 50 



247 52 



105 88 



$593 12 $5&224 99 



POLICE. . 85 

Amounts brought forward, $593 12 $53,224 99 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To Alfred Day, for conveyance of prisoners 

to House of Correction, 110 95 

H. H. Fuller, for conveyance of prison- 
ers to House of Correction, 205 45 

Jacob G. Favor, for conveyance of pris- 
oners to House of Correction, trav- 
eling expenses, telegrams, stamps, 
etc., 92 71 

William P. Farrington, for cash paid 
for burying dogs, and expenses to 
Nashua, 2 90 

Daniel Hayes, for traveling expenses, 12 50 

S. B. Harris, for cash paid expenses in 

larceny cases, 29 45 

Albert E. Libby, for cash paid expenses 

in larceny cases, 10 50 

B. G. Moone}^, for cash paid expenses 

in conveying persons to State Lu- 
natic Hospital, etc., . . ■. 130 68 

Isaac L. Libby, for cash paid for wash- 
ing at Police Station, etc., 48 75 

G. J. & D. Bradt, for crackers, 72 25 

S. A. Scripture & Co., for crackers,. . . 46 00 

Emerson & Wright, for tea, sugar and 

matches, 12 59 

C. D. Washburn, for brush, 1 25 

M. F. Wright, for tea and sugar, 1 20 

A. C. Wright & Co., for tea, sugar, 

matches and oil, 10 19 

Arthur McAloon, for soap, 1 7 60 

P. M. Jefferson, for soap, ............ 4 50 

Daniel Gage, for ice, 18 90 

C. R. Kimball, for bandages, 3 00 

E. O. Blake, for globes and burners,. . 7 50 
H. R. Barker & Co., for pipe, hose, 

scrapers, etc., 26 50 

F. Calvert, for steam fixtures and la- 
bor 12 96 

T. Costello & Co., for galvanized iron 

barrels, 24 00 

T. R. Garity & Co., for pipe, 2 88 

S. G. Mack & Co., for repairing stove, 

etc., 3 50 



Amounts carried forward^ .......... $1 ,501 83 $53,224 99 



86 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $1,501 83 $53,224 99 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To Offutt & Whitaker, for furniture, cur- 
tains,, lamps, settees, repairing 

stoves, etc., 220 20 

H. H. Wilder & Co., for plumbing, ash 

hods, etc. , 164 76 

N. J. Wier & Co., for match safes, dust 

pans, etc., 2 75 

John Butcher, for iron, 96 

Fielding & Bartlett, for safe, 500 00 

Fielding & Bartlett, for hardware, 4 54 

H. B. Shattuck. for hardware, 24 79 

Cole & Nichols^ for castings, 8 44 

John J. Tower, for duplex police calls 

and lanterns, > 6200 

Milton Aldrich, for clubs, 21 80 

Mark Holmes, Jr., for ebony acorns,.. . 6 00 

A. L. Brooks & Co., for lumber, 6 10 

J. A. Brabrook, for police belts, strap- 
ping clubs, &c, 69 84 

George Thatcher, for repairing clock,. . 1 25 

French & Puffer, for water cooler, 9 00 

Benner Bros., for feather duster, 3 75 

Brown & Chase, for printing, 8 50 

Bacheller, Dumas & Co., for blank 

books, 10^50 

F. P. Coggeshall, for blank books, sta- 

tionery, &c, 34 85 

Henry C. Church, for basket, inkstand, 

ink, pens, &c, 19 35 

Joshua Merrill & Son, for blank books 

and stationery, 18 60 

J. C. Irish, for professional services,.. . 2 00 

Walter H. Leighton, for professional 

services, 2 00 

Joseph H. Smith, for professional ser- 
vices, 13 GO 

G. W. Norris, for use of horse and 

wagon, 1 50 

William B. Moffatt, for learning, 75 

WMlliam Roberts, for teaming, 1 00 

J. R. Welsh, for cash paid for burying 

dog, > l 00 

William Clifford, for labor, 12 50 



Amounts carried forward, $2,733 56 $53,224 99 



POLICE. Si 

Amounts brought forward, $2,733 56 $53,224 99 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To J. L. Powers, for whitewashing, ...... 13 50 

D. M. Preseott & Co., for mason work 

and material, 124 25 

D. Woodward, for lettering door posts, 3 00 
Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 

for fuel, 569 04 

Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 

for labor, 2 88 

Appropriation for Schools, for brooms, 

mat, brushes, pails, &c., 1 1 80 

Appropriation for repairs of Public 

Buildings, for lumber and moulding, 7 80 
Appropriation for Water Works, for use 

of water, 75 00 

Reserved Fund, for janitor and fireman 

at Police Station, 630 25 

Reserved Fund, for labor, . . . . , 164 10 

4,335 18 

Whole expenditure for the year, 57,560 17 

Balance undrawn January 1st, 1876, 14,934 31 

$72,494 48 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1875, $5,165 15 

Appropriated and assessed in 1875, 42,000 00 



RECEIPTS. 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
Fire Department : 

From Boston & Maine Railroad Company, 

for labor, c 26 00 

From Lowell Machine Shop, for hydrant, 5 00 

From J. W. Bennett, for rent of land,* ... 50 00 

From George Hobson, for hydrant, old 

material, filling cisterns, etc., 118 6'$ 

From Z. Coward, for filling cistern, 4 00 

From Cole & Nichols, for old copper, .... 72 70 

From L. G. Howe, for old door, 1 68 

From J. Wight & Co., for hydrant, 7 80 

From Joseph S. Brown, for lantern tops,. . 2 00 

From E. B. Wentworth, for fireman's 

badge, 5 00 

From C. D. Green, for fireman's- badge,.... 5 00 

From Appropriation for Schools, for labor, 4 00 

From Appropriation for School Houses, 

for labor, 16 25 

From Appropriation for Paupers, for la- 
bor, manure, etc., 328 50 

From Appropriation for Sewers and Drains, 

for labor, etc., 191 80 

From Appropriation for Commons, for la- 
bor, 1 50 

From Appropriation for Lighting Streets 
and Public Buildings, for stove and 

boiler, 15 00 

From Appropriation for Repairs of Public 

Buildings, for labor, , 23 00 



$47,165 15 



Amounts carried forward, $8-77 05 $47,165 15 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 89 



Amounts orouglit forward, $877 95 $47,165 15 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
Fire Department : 

From Appropriation for Health Account, 

for labor, , 15 00 

From Appropriation for Water Works, for 

hauling pipe, and labor, 2,200 79 

From Reserved Fund, for labor, 3 75 

3,097 49 
Transferred from Reserved Fund, . ....... 2,000 00 

5,097 49 

$52,262 64 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid CHIEF ENGINEER AND ASSIST- 
ANT ENGINEERS : 

To George Hobson, Chief Engineer, salary 

to January 1, 1876, 1,400 00 

Charles H. Arlin, Assistant Engineer, 

to November 1, 1875, 187 50 

Samuel W. Taylor, Assistant Engineer, 

to November 1, 1875, 125 00 

William W. Bates, Assistant Engineer, 

to May 1, 1875, 62 50 

Hiram M. Hall, Assistant Engineer, and 

Clerk for the Board of Engineers, to 

November 1, 1875, 150 00 

Edward S. Hosmer, Assistant Engineer, 

to November 1, 1875, 125 00 

2,050 00 

Paid to FIREMEN : 

To Firemen, for annual pay to November 

1, 1875, r , 11,960 00 

11,960 00 

Paid for SERVICES AS DRIVERS AND 
STEWARDS OF STEAM FIRE EN- 
GINES, &c. : 

To George Teel, No. 1, 754 00 

Henry Boynton, No. 2, : . . . 728 00 

Amounts carried forward, $1,482 00 $14,010 00 

12 



90 auditor's report. 

Amounts brought forward, $1,482 00 $14,010 00 

Paid for SERVICES AS DRIVERS AND 
STEWARDS OF STEAM FIRE EN- 
GINES, &c. : 

To George B. Whitney, No. 3, 736 00 

H. J. Foster, Hook and Ladder 384 00 

C. F. Lane, Hook and Ladder, 176 00 

W. L. Peabody, Hook and Ladder, 166 00 

J. F. Lord (temporary), 44 00 

Charles A. Lord, Horse Hose, 730 00 

3,718 00 

Paid for ENGINE HOUSE ON GOR- 
HAM STREET: 

To Cberrington & Cherrington. for plans, 

details and specifications, 293 52 

Merrill & Calef, for building brick en- 
gine house on Gorham street, as 

per contract, 9,784 00 

Merrill & Calef, for extra labor and 

material, 142 35 

D. M. Prescott & Co., for centre piece, 10 00 

Paid for HEATING APPARATUS, 
BELL, &c, FOR ENGINE HOUSE, 
GORHAM STREET: 

To H. R. Barker & Co., for heating ap- 
paratus, as per contract, 390 00 

H. R. Barker & Co., for boiler tools,. . 3 00 

Gamewell & Co., for bell striker, 500 00 

Nay lor & Co., for cast-steel bell, 199 10 

Robert Goulding, for tin, solder and 

labor, 6 00 

Fiske & Spalding, for window shades, 

etc 52 62 

Reserved Fund, for labor, etc., 54 77 

Paid for HAY, GRAIN, &c. : 

To Appropriation for Paupers, for hay,. .. 227 41 
Milton Fox, for hay, 6137 

Amounts carried forward, $288 78 $29,163 36 

* Add to this amount $2,882.60 paid for land in 1874, making the total cost of land and 
building, $13,111.87. 



*10,229 87 



1,205 49 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



91 



Amounts brought forward, $288 78 

Paid for HAY, GEAIN, &c. : 

To Parker Fletcher, for hay, 35 94 

L. H. Parker, for hay, 16 87 

W. S. Parker, for hay, ' 19 14 

S. T. Spalding, for hay, 27 84 

A . J. Trull , for hay and straw, 210 83 

W. H. Wiggin, for hay, 44 23 

John Little & Co., for oats, 75 36 

William E. Livingston, for hay, meal 

and oats, 171 45 

Rogers & Lord, for oats, meal and corn, 283 78 
Samuel N. Wood & Son, for oats, meal 

and hay, 173 91 



>,163 36 



1,348 13 



Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To Appropriation for Schools, for rent,. .. 150 00 
Appropriation for School Houses, for 

lumber, paint, nails, labor, etc.,. ... 31 02 

Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 

for fuel, labor, etc., 504 82 

Appropriation for Repairs of Public 
Buildings, for lumber, nails, var- 
nish, paint, etc., 35 37 

Appropriation for Lighting Streets and 

Public Buildings, for matches, 6 24 

Appropriation for Water Works, for use 

of water, 11,288 56 

Appropriation for Water Works, for 

pipe, labor, etc. , 86 18 

Reserved Fund, for heating double En- 
gine House for one year, to January 

1, 1876, 150 00 

Reserved Fund, for labor, etc., 214 46 

George B. Whitney, for services as 

operator of Fire Alarm Telegraph, 300 00 
Peter F. Webster, for services as Stew- 
ard of Rocket Engine, 50 00 

John F. Lord, for labor on hydrants, &c, 22 25 

E. L. Brown, for labor with steamer,. . 3 00 

J. G. Merchant, for labor with steamer, 2 00 

John Gillogly, for labor, 10 50 

Amounts carried forward, $12,854 40 



,511 49 



92 auditor's report. 

Amounts brought forward, $12,854 40 $30,511 49 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To J. Harrington, for labor on water pipe 

and hydrants, 87 49 

D. W. Hillard, for labor on water pipe 

and hydrants, ... 6 12 

William Hunt, for labor on water pipe 

and hydrants, 195 10 

George Maddocks, for labor on water 

pipe, 11 37 

Charles McGivney, for labor on water 

pipe, 13 12 

Nicholas Gibbey, for lettering and var- 
nishing hose sleighs, 9 00 

Atlantic and Pacific Telegraph Com- 
pany, for telegraph poles, 16 75 

Gamewell & Co., for gong, locks and 

signal box, 410 00 

Allen Fire Department Supply Co., for 
gauge cocks, stop nozzles and spray 
tips, 88 25 

H. R. Barker & Co., for pipe, couplings, 

elbows, brackets, labor, &c, 110 18 

J. W. Bennett, for composition, felt, 

moulding, labor, &c, 12 20 

John Butcher, for bolts, 20 

George L. Cady, for repairing steamer 

No. 2, 1 32 

George H. Convers, for repairing car- 
riages, 78 46 

A. K. Lynch & Co., for repairing lamps, 6 25 

Swett & Clark, for hose sleigh, 100 00 

T. H. Curtis, for repairing locks, keys, 

etc., , 2 10 

Cole & Nichols, for zinc, 38 35 

Matthias Mead, for repairing stove, 

etc., 16 30 

Rice & Co., for force pumps, 15 00 

James Wight & Co., for couplings, re- 
ducers, hose, labor, etc., 72 17 

T. Costello & Co., for water fixtures 

and plumbing, 218 41 

S. G. Mack & Co., for water fixtures 

and plumbing, 126 15 

Amounts carried forward, $14,488 69 $30,511 49 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 93 



Amounts brought forward, $14,488 69 $30,51 1 49 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To H. H. Wilder & Co., for pipe, shovels, 
dust pans, oil cans, sheet copper, 
labor, etc., 49 18 

West, Bradley & Cary Manufacturing 

Co., for telegraph wire 79 50 

Hunneman & Co., for iron, screws and 

labor 16 70 

Charles E. Adams, for hardware, 11 75 

Fielding & Bartlett, for hardware and 

tools, » . . 28 67 

Jacob Rogers & Co., for wire, 28 

H. B. Shattuck, for force pumps, hard- 
ware, etc., 33 43 

Stearns & George, for wire, insulators, 

etc. 38 00 

L. C. Dodge, for polishing powder,. ... 5 00 

S. L. Butman, for repairing harnesses, 13 60 

J. A. Brabrook, for blankets, brushes, 

repairing harnesses, etc., • 54 49 

Josiah Gates & Sons, for repairing hose 

and buckets, 64 50 

A. Bacheller & Co., for moulding,.... 2 76 

A. L. Brooks & Co., for lumber, mould- 
ing, etc., 43 97 

Davis & Sargent, for lumber, 198 88 

John Pettingell, for water tank, 40 00 

Howes & Burnham, for lumber, 14 11 

M. C. Pratt & Co., for lumber, mould- 
ing, sash and doors, 6 06 

C. W. Saunders & Co., for lumber,. ... 781 

H. Whitne}' & Co., for lumber, 45 62 

Brown & Carter, for painting, 13 10 

C. B. Coburn & Co., for glass, paints, 
oil, sponge, rope, blocks, lantern 
globes, candles, etc., 34 24 

Fiske & Spalding, for chamois skins, 
feather dusters, window shades, 
cords, etc., 44 15 

Jonathan Kendall, for paints, 1 90 

Nichols & Fletcher, for salt and cam- 
phor, 2 75 

Runels, Davis & Foster, for stone posts, 20 00 

G. P. Palmer, for oil, 4 00 



Amounts carried forward,. ..... ■....$15,363 14 $30,511 49 



94 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward,. $15,363 14 $30,511 49 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To Henry Moulton, for ladder, 17 00 

Charles F. Blanchard, for condition 

powders, 2 00 

J. R. Hayes, for hoof ointment, 1 00 

C. I. Hood & Co., for hoof ointment,. . 50 

Alfred Barney, for brooms, 8 25 

Benner Brothers, for clocks, bureaus, 

chairs, repairing mattresses, etc.,. . 75 75 
H. Hosford & Co., for blankets and 

cotton, 13 13 

Brown & Chase, for printing, 5 75 

F. P. Coggeshall, for blank books, sta- 

tionery, etc., 7 45 

Henry C. Church, for waste, book and 

paper, 11 53 

John Conner, Agent, for coal and salt, 53 93 

Perkins & Job, for coal, 28 00 

C. H. Fletcher, for use of horse, 6 00 

G. L. Huntoon, for use of horse and 
carriage, 3 00 

H. O. Morse, for use of horse and car- 
riage, 4 50 

G. W. Norris, for storing hose car- 
riage, c 5 00 

Robert Wood, for medicine and services 

as veterinary surgeon, 3 50 

J. C. Bennett, for ladder and number- 
ing doors, 7 00 

E. A. & A. T. Smith, for concrete, 16 80 

George Hobson, for cash paid for ex- 
penses to New York, labor on pipe, 
brushes, waste, expenses to Wor- 
cester, etc., 108 29 

James Fitzgerald, for labor, 26 25 

J.fW. Purcell, for labor and material,.. 10 00 

Thomas Allen, for labor, 6 00 

Boston & Lowell and Nashua & Lowell 
Railroad Company, for transporta- 
tion, 9 93 

Sargent & Co. 's Express, for transpor- 
tation, 25 

Middlesex Company, for woolen waste, 24 58 

Amounts carried forward, $15,818 53 $30,511 49 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 95 



Amounts brought forward, » $15,818 53 $30,511 49 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To C. P. Talbot & Co., for blue vitriol and 

sulphate zinc, 1 50 47 

M. Meaney, for canvas cover, 4 00 

Bennett & Moulton, for mason work 

and material, 7 75 

Drew & Harper, for supper for firemen 

and guests, 230 00 

Berry's Brass Band, for services at fire- 
men's parade, , 66 00 

B. Goddard & Son, for damage to car- 
riage and harness, 885 

16,285 60 

Whole expenditure for the year, 46,797 09 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1876,. ...... 5,465 55 

$52,262 64 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1875, $10,396 09 

Appropriated and assessed in 1875, 65,000 00 



$75,396 09 



RECEIPTS. 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
Sewers and Drains : 

IN JANUARY. 

From Halliclay & Vreeland, for pipe, 43 05 

From Appropriation for Water Works, for 

laying pipe, 960 00 



IN FEBRUARY. 

From Halliday & Vreeland, for pipe and 
paving, 

From Henry Gotham, for sewer assessment, 
From George Baron, for sewer assessment, 
From G. W. Haseltine, for sewer assess^ 

men t, > . « 

From P. H. Britton, for sewer assessment, 
From A. B. Richardson, for sewer assess- 
ment, 

From H. R. Barker, for sewer assessment, 
From J. G. Wood, for sewer assessment, 
From Mary A. Delaney, for sewer assess- 
ment, 

From Patrick Tighe, for sewer assessment, 
From Francis Conley, for sewer assessment, 
From Wm. Clark, for sewer assessment,.. 
From Patrick Mead, for sewer assessment, 
From Patrick Riley, for sewer assessment, 
From Patrick Hnrbert, for sewer assess- 
ment, 

Amounts carried forward, 



1,003 05 



31 


63 


21 


59 


60 


69 


24 


69 


12 


94 


53 


54 


75 


27 


30 


38 


16 


52 


13 


86 


35 


88 


27 


48 


14 


71 


14 


39 


11 


19 


$444 


76 $76,399 14 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 97 



14 


74 


29 


02 


8 


11 


41 


70 


14 


98 


26 


75 



9 


86 


28 


13 


36 


44 


26 


62 


44 


76 


46 


49 


92 


63 



580 06 



Amounts brought forward, $444 76 $76,399 14 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
Sewers and Drains : 

From Thomas Mooney, for sewer assess- 
ment, 

From Henry Castles, for sewer assess- 
ment, 

From Isabella Leach, for sewer assess- 
ment, • 

From John Dodge, for sewer assessment, 
From W. B. Tyrrell, for sewer assessment, 
From H. G. Burgess, for sewer assessment, 

IN MARCH. 

From John Clee, for sewer assessment, ... 16 53 

From Philip Donahoe, for sewer assess- 
ment, 

From Jacob Ames, for sewer assessment, 

From Mrs. R. Reed, for sewer assessment, 

From Peter Conley, for sewer assessment, 

From Sarah A. Stanwood, for sewer as- 
sessment, 

From M. Frye, for sewer assessment, .... 

From Jane Wells, for sewer assessment,. . 

From Thomas Birkenhead, for sewer as- 
sessment, 10 77 

From Mrs. Thomas Purcell, for sewer as- 
sessment, 7 68 

From Betsy Swan, for sewer assessment, 8 34 

From Caroline Stevens, for sewer assess- 
ment, 12 32 

From Margaret Lambert, for sewer assess- 
ment, 

From John Moran, for sewer assessment, 

From B. McDonald, for sewer assessment, 

From Edward McArdell, for sewer assess- 
ment, 

From M. Moran, for sewer assessment,. .. 

From A. P. Miller, for sewer assessment, 

From Appropriation for Commons, for 
sewer assessments, 

From John Dennis, for sewer assessment, 

From John Stott, for sewer assessment,.. 

F.om Charles Stott, for sewer assessment, 

Amounts carried forward, ...... 

13 



10 


25 






16 


94 






2 


66 






18 


17 






16 


94 






38 


67 






853 


32 






48 


98 






30 


62 






9 


92 






$1,387 C4 


$76,979 


20 



98 auditor's report. 

Amounts brought forward, 81,387 04 $76,979 20 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
Sewers and Drains : 

From Belvidere Woolen Mills, for sewer 

assessment, * • 18 46 

From E. T. Wilson, for sewer assessment, 49 68 

From William Phasey, for sewer assess- 
ment, 13 79 

From Mrs. J. Evans, for sewer assessment, 46 62 

From Mrs. A. Cummings, for sewer assess- 
ment, 25 97 

From A. & J. Abbott, for sewer assess- 
ment, 24 41 

From G. A. Bennett, for sewer assessment, 32 12 

From W. G. Tilton, for sewer assessment, 30 00 

From William Langley, for sewer assess- 
ment, 37 92 

From John Young, for sewer assessment, 12 11 

From J. B. Brown & Merriam, for sewer 

assessment, 94 68 

From L. W. Slade, for sewer assessment, 23 93 

1,796 73 

IN APRIL. 

From heirs of John Duff, for sewer assess- 
ment, * 29 17 

From Charles Harmon, for sewer assess- 
ment, 14 56 

From Appropriation for Repairs of Public 

Buildings, for sewer assessment, 201 85 

From West-Fifth Street Chapel, for sewer 

assessment, > 68 14 

From O. O. Davis, for sewer assessment, 48 25 

From J. A. Buttrick, for sewer assessment, 26 93 

From Ellen R. Smith, for sewer assessment, 12 05 

From Charlotte Brothers, for sewer assess- 
ment, » 3 42 

From Mrs. J. E. Bailey, for sewer assess- 
ment, 94 33 

, From George L. Cady, for sewer assess- 
ment, « 49 85 

From L. C. Dodge, for sewer assessment, 48 66 

From Nathan Morse, for sewer assessment, 27 53 

From Halliday & Vreeland, for damage^ 

paid H. B. Shattuck, 25 00 

649 74 

Amount carried forward, $79,425 67 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 99 

Amount brought forward, $79,425 67 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
Sewers and Drains : 

IN MAY. 

From John Quinn, for sewer assessment, 26 93 
From A. C. Holt, for sewer assessment,.. 17 23 
From H. C. Howe, for sewer assessment, 85 84 
From J. F. Howe, for sewer assessment,. . 112 90 
From G. W. Walker, for sewer assessment, 65 84 
From Cutter & Walker, for sewer assess- 
ment, 9 49 

From Stephen Cutter, for sewer assess- 
ment, 125 50 

From Lowell Five Cents Savings Bank, for 

sewer assessment, 58 97 

From W. H. Anderson, for sewer assess- 
ment, 153 52 

From C. M. Gilman, for sewer assessment, 55 87 

712 09 

IN JUNE. 

From L. Edgell, for sewer assessment,.. . . 16 18 

From John Shanahan, for sewer assess- 
ment, 10 00 

From Thomas Carolin, for sewer assess- 
ment, 10 06 

From R. Butterfield, for sewer assessment, 61 83 

From Jason Fuller, for sewer assessment, 58 57 

156 64 

IN JULY. 

From Charles B. Mellen, for sewer assess- 
ment, 12 48 

From George H. Marston, for sewer as- 
sessment, 43 94 

From E. J. Hubbard, for sewer assessment, 37 94 

From Francis Goward, for sewer assess- 
ment, 62 50 

From J. B. French, for amount refunded 

on award of September 23, 1873, 154 83 

- 311 69 

IN AUGUST. 

From A. C. Ayer, for sewer assessment,.. 26 44 

From A. Hovey, for sewer assessment,. . . 38 13 

Amouids carried forward, $64 57 $80,606 09 



100 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $64 57 $80,606 09 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
Sewers and Drains : 

From E. A. Smith, for sewer assessment, 12 34 

From H. W. Blaisdell, for sewer assess- 
ment, , 47 33 

From William G. Chase, for sewer assess- 
ment, 38 52 

From E. B. Howe, for sewer assessment,. . 26 12 

From J. M. G. Parker, for sewer assess- 
ment, 21 42 

From Andrew Fahey, for sewer assess- 
ment, 18 99 

From State of New Hampshire, for sewer 

assessment, 81 07 

From heirs of John Nesmith, for sewer as- 
sessment, 79 63 

From S. Bartlett, for sewer assessment,.. 67 38 

From W. A. Brown, for sewer assessment, 19 33 

From J. Riley, for sewer assessment, 7 68 

From T. Harrington, for sewer assessment, 14 18 

From A. C. Wright, for sewer assessment, 36 14 

534 70 

IN SEPTEMBER. 

From Ira Hartwell, for overdraft, 27 00 

From William Murkland, for sewer assess- 
ment, 90 64 

From H. G. Leslie, for sewer assessment, 33 81 

From James Marren, for sewer assessment, 118 31 

From George W. Stanley, for sewer as- 
sessment, 10 63 

From Abby A. Adams, for sewer assess- 
ment, 11 72 

From Henry M. Ordway, for sewer assess- 
ment, 88 21 

From James Bailey, for sewer assessment, 10 01 

From John O'Hearn, for sewer assessment, 73 70 

From Lowell Worsted Compan}', for sewer 

assessment, 1 28 22 

From Mrs. H. M. Bruce, for sewer assess- 
ment, 62 15 

From estate of D. Penniman, for sewer as- 
sessment, 9938 

Amounts carried forward, $753 78 $81 ,140 79 






SEWERS AND DRAINS. 101 



1,090 52 



Amounts brought forward, $753 78 $81,140 79 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
Sewers and Drains : 

From Catherine McMauus, for sewer as- 
sessment, .,...» 1 03 08 

From Robert Goulding, for sewer assess- 
ment, ! 37 98 

From heirs of C. Merrill, for sewer assess- 
ment, 21 38 

From John Bramhall, for sewer assess- 
ment, 123 12 

From H. H. Rodliff, for sewer assessment, 33 67 

From Horace Ela, for sewer assessment,. . 17 51 

IN OCTOBER. 

From Mrs. G. L. Martin, for sewer assess- 
ment, 21 42 

From F. H. Penniman, for sewer assess- 
ment, 46 35 

From Appropriation for School Houses, 

for sewer assessment, 26 71 

From City Hospital, for sewer assessment, 293 85 

From C. A. F. Swan, for sewer assessment, 91 74 

From John LeBarge, for sewer assessment, 53 60 

From Charles W. Sleeper, for sewer as- 
sessment, 35 01 

From Mrs. H. M. Brown, for sewer assess- 
ment, ,, 62 15 

IN NOVEMBER. 

From J. F. Manahan, for sewer assess- 
ment, 59 51 

From Henry Robbins, for sewer assess- 
ment, 25 56 

From James U. Gage, for sewer assess- 
ment, 38 69 

From W. Eaton, for sewer assessment,.. . 63 31 

From Thomas Dolan, for sewer assessment, 19 70 

From Mrs. A. Wright, for sewer assess- 
ment, 30 81 

From George Richardson, for sewer assess- 
ment, 89 95 

Amounts carried forward, $327 53 $82,862 14 



630 83 



102 auditor's report. 

Amounts brought forward, $327 53 $82,862 14 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
Sewers and Drains : 

From Daniel Murphy, for sewer assess- 
ment 30 50 

From Michael Maguire, for sewer assess- 
ment, : 36 00 

From M. Marshall, for sewer assessment, 25 47 
From S. T. Manahan, for sewer assess- 
ment, 74 36 

From Charles Abels, for sewer assessment, 11 46 

505 32 

IN DECEMBER. 

From William Hird, for sewer assessment, 40 21 
From John Grimes, for sewer assessment, 24 74 
From E. R. Blair, for sewer assessment, . . 145 82 
From E. M. Varnum, for sewer assessment, 57 07 
From Edmund Elliott, for sewer assess- 
ment,., 21 19 

From Franklin Martin, for sewer assess- 
ment, 23 46 

From Osgood & Prescott, for sewer assess- 
ment, 34 51 

From Thomas Gibson, for sewer assess- 
ment, 69 86 

From S. S. Fisher, for sewer assessment,. . 25 30 

From S. Kidder, for remote drainage,. ... 25 00 

From B. F. Sargent, for labor, 4 82 • 

From M. McMorrow, for sewer assessment, 29 12 
From Mrs. Ann Lord, for sewer assessment, 41 85 
From Mrs. F. A. Hill, for sewer assess- 
ment, «... 23 55 

From Royal Southwick, for sewer assess- 
ment, 251 50 

From J. S. Russell, for remote drainage,. . 25 00 
From R. M. Hutchinson, for remote drain- 
age, 25 00 

From R. H. Staples for remote drainage,.. 50 00 

From Ann Brown, for sewer assessment,. . 10 50 

From J. A. Wheeler, for sewer assessment, 39 77 

From John Connell, for sewer assessment, 25 62 

From E. A. Smith, for sewer assessment, 29 34 

From L. Chamberlin, for sewer assessment, 29 53 

From L. C. Wing, for sewer assessment,.. 12 73 

Amounts carried forward, $1,065 49 $83,367 46 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 103 



Amounts brought forward, $1,065 49 $83,367 46 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
Sewers and Drains : 

From R. B. Whitney, for sewer assessment, 38 83 

From Edward Barrett, for sewer assess- 
ment, 48 53 

From Daniel Bryant, for sewer assessment, 59 10 

From T. C. Blaisdell, for sewer assessment, 97 30 

From S. N. Proctor, for remote drainage, 20 00 

From Stephen Griffin, for sewer assess- 
ment, 45 80 

From Joseph Plunkett, for sewer assess- 
ment, 75 37 



1,450 42 

$84,817 88 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for CONSTRUCTING SEWER 
IN MERRIMACK AND PRESCOTT 
STREETS : 

To Halliday & Vreeland, as per contract 

No. 12 (balance), $995 57 



$995 57 



Paid for CONSTRUCTING SUFFOLK 
STREET OUTLET SEWER: 

To Halliday & Vreeland, as per contract 

No. 13 (balance), 7,646 50 



7,646 50 



Paid for CONSTRUCTING and RE- 
PAIRING SEWERS under direction 
of SUPERINTENDENT of STREETS : 

Paid for LABOR, as per PAY ROLLS : 

In Januaiy, 172 64 

April, 1,169 52 

May, c... 3,840 20 

June, » 4,369 38 

July, 3,390 88 

August, 3,269 87 



Amounts carried forward, $16,212 49 $8,642 07 



104 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, 816,212 49 $8,642 07 

Paid for CONSTRUCTING and RE- 
PAIRING SEWERS under direction of 
SUPERINTENDENT of STREETS : 

Paid for LABOR, as per PAY ROLLS : 

In September, 3,363 91 

October, 1,811 38 

November, 1 ,440 68 

December, , 1,181 44 

24,009 90 



Paid for DAMAGES, &c. : 

To J. B. French, for damages awarded by 
Sheriff's jury, for constructing sewer 
through his land, from Railroad 
street to Boston and Lowell Rail- 
road, 3,868 12 

T. C. Blaisdell, for damage to estate in 

construction of sewer, 10 52 

Middlesex Company, for damage to 
gateway and boiler-house in con- 
struction of sewer in Hurd street,. . 225 00 

Lowell Gas Light Company, for damages 
caused by construction of sewers in 
Warren, Central and Merrimack 
streets, 106 48 

James Thornton, for damage to crops 
in construction of sewer on Front 
street, 10 00 

Luther Richards, for damage to estate 
by overflowing of sewer in Water 
street, 50 00 

D. M. Wills, for damage to cellar and 
property by overflowing of sewer in 
Cabot street, 33 75 

W. Eaton, for damage to cellar and 

drain, 33 00 

George F. Richardson, for cash paid for 
summoning witnesses, etc., in case 
of J. B. French vs. City of Lowell, . . 82 10 

George F. Richardson, for cash paid for 
summoning witnesses, etc., in case 
of Tighe vs. City of Lowell, 72 22 

Amounts carried forward, $4,491 19 $32,651 97 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 105 



Amounts brought forward, $4,491 19 $32,651 97 

Paid for DAMAGES, &c. : 

To F. Nickerson, for advice and attendance 
at court in case of Tighe vs. City of 
Lowell, 25 00 

H. L. Williams, for services in case of 

J. B. French vs. City of Lowell, . ... 25 00 

J. B. French (as per resolution), 600 00 



Paid for ABATEMENT OF SEWER AS- 
SESSMENTS : 

To Robert Ewan (as per resolution),... ... 52 11 

Harry R. Rice (as per resolution), 230 36 

George W. Norris (as per resolution), . . 72 00 

C. J. Eastman (as per resolution), .... 69 00 

William Clark, for amount overpaid on 
sewer assessment on West Fifth 

street, 13 55 

Emma J. Hubbard, for amount paid for 
remote drainage on Willow street in 
October, 1868, 15 00 



Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

use of steamer and labor, 10 00 

Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 
for labor, coal, brick, engineering, 

flagging, sand, etc., 3,072 22 

Appropriation for Lighting, for kero- 
sene, etc 3 75 

Appropriation for Water Works, for 
blacksmithing, pipe, lead, labor, use 

of water, etc., 515 48 

Wilder Bennett, for bricks, 2,437 07 

Warren C. Crosby, for drain pipe, 195 44 

Lewis D. Gumb, for stone, 75 00 

Lowell Gas Light Company, for sand 

and cement, 1 06 

Frye & Kittredge, for cement, etc.,. ... 1,191 72 
William E. Livingston, for brick, cement 

and sand, 4,612 52 



5,041 19 



452 02 



Amounts carried forward, 812,114 26 $38,145 18 

14 



106 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $12,114 26 $38,145 18 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To Middleburgh Blue Stone Company, for 

catch basins, 506 25 

Benjamin Palmer, for stone, 164 43 

William Reed, for stone, 78 25 

N. T. Staples & Sons, for drain pipe, 

labor, etc., 9,014 23 

Cole & Nichols, for catch basins, man- 
hole covers, castings, etc., 288 54 

Henry W. Clapp, for sewer caps, etc.,. . 192 54 

Pevey Bros., for catch basins, manhole 

covers, castings, etc., 1,632 85 

Charles E. Adams, for hardware, 

F. E. Bennett, for shovels, 

Fielding and Bartlett, for hardware, . . . 

Horace B. Shattuck, for hardware, 

Jesse W. Starr & Sons, for pipe, 

A. J. Wilkinson & Co., for forge and 
hood, 

H. R. Barker & Co., for use of steam 
pump, labor, etc., 

American Bolt Company, for pile shoes, 

John Butcher, for iron, 

Fuller, Dana and Fitz, for iron, 

Lowell Machine Shop, for castings,. .. . 

Dodge, Gilbert & Co., for iron, 

S. A. Abbott, for repairing tinware,.. . 

S. Gr. Mack & Co., for tinware and labor «• 

repairing pump, 4 20 

H. H. Wilder & Co., for tinware, solder 

and labor, 44 23 

J. C. Jockow, for blacksmithing, 

J. W. Murkland, for drilling irons bars, 

J. W. Trumbull, for filing saws, 

J. H. Haskell, for filing saws, 

William Robinson, for drilling iron 
bars, 

A. L. Brooks & Co., for one ash pole, 

Howes & Burnham, for lumber, 

C. W. Saunders & Co., for lumber,. . . . 

H. Whitney & Co., for lumber, 

H. & A. Whitney, for lumber, 

C. B. Coburn & Co., for lanterns, 
twine, rope, blocks, oil, couplings, 
pails, oakum, waste, packing, etc., 122 38 



47 


40 


27 


75 


147 


22 


211 


48 


623 


80 


30 


00 


92 


00 


15 


80 


171 


41 


9 


07 


82 


28 


28 


24 


3 


05 



7 


10 


8 


40 


1 


65 


14 


85 


4 


00 




50 


548 


20 


453 


09 


106 


46 


76 


16 



Amounts carried forward, $26,872 07 $38,145 18 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 107 



Amounts brought forward, $26,872 07 $38,145 18 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To H. G. Holden, for dualin, electric fuse 

and labor, 666 40 

A. L. Ready, for old rope, etc.,....'.. 62 04 

Nichols & Fletcher, for powder, fuse, 

pails, rope, oatmeal, etc., 42 61 

A. L. Russell, for salt, 132 

R. K. Runals, for oatmeal, salt, oil, etc., 27 30 

E. A. & A. T. Smith, for repairing con- 

crete, 6 50 

Stickney & Spofford, for oatmeal, oil, 

salt, etc., 6 50 

P. Quinn, for oil, soap, glass, etc.,. ... 3 83 

H. Hosford, for glass and labor, 6 00 

H. Wright & Co., for rubber boots,. . .. 12 00 

John G. Allen, for repairing pumps,. . . 52 75 

Amos Green, for pick handles, 4 50 

Josiah Gates & Sons, for scrap leather 

and cement, 50 

F. P. Coggeshall, for books and sta- 
tionery, 9 50 

Joshua Merrill & Son, for books and 

stationery, 4 15 

A. Whitne3 r , for books, 1 00 

J. T. Carter & Co., for book-case, 40 00 

George E. Evans, for cash paid for 

postage stamps, 3 50 

John C. Woodward, for cash paid for 

salt, 13 20 

Clerk of Courts, Middlesex County, for 

copies of records, 46 00 

Boston & Lowell and Nashua & Low- 
ell Railroad Company, for freight 
on brick, sewer caps, stone, etc.,.. 1,275 71 

Penniman & Co.'s Express, for freight 

on iron, 3 50 

Sargent & Co.'s Express, for transpor- 
tation, -« 1 50 

Charles A. Bryant, for labor, 202 50 

J. A. Sawtelle, for repairing pile ma- 
chine, 32 00 

George H. Brown, for labor, 12 50 

James Bassett, for repairing bellows,. . 2 50 

C. J. Cheney, for use of patterns, 15 00 

Amounts carried forward,. $29,426 88 $38,145 18 



108 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



Amounts brought forward, $29,426 88 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To Proprietors of Locks and Canals on 

Merrimack River, for use of water, 16 20 

Ira Hartwell, for labor, 2,579 03 

F. H. Penniman, for teaming, 704 95 

O. A. Simpson, for teaming, etc., 1,365 73 

Middlesex Company, for use of water 
and forge, labor, bagging, shavings, 

felting, tar, etc., 130 80 

N. W. Norcross, for repairing wood 

pavement, 10 00 

Edwin Sanborn, for labor, 6 50 

James Cowell, for teaming, 4 50 

Timothy Kelley, for teaming, 2 00 

Thomas Kerwin, for teaming, 4 00 

James Leach, for teaming, 2 25 

Arthur F. Briggs, for labor, 30 00 

Daniel McCarthy, for teaming, 7 00 

William McCarty, - for teaming, 6 00 

W. B. Moffatt, for teaming, 1 00 

James Nixon, for teaming, 2 75 

William Roberts, for teaming, 11 25 

William M. Smith, for labor, 21 00 

Edward Smith, for labor, 5 75 

James T. Trask, for teaming, 1 50 

Peter Mahoney, for labor, 15 37 

John White, for teaming,. 15 00 

Whole expenditure for the year, 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1876, 



$83,145 18 



34,369 46 

72,514 64 
12,303 24 



84,817 88 



COMMONS. 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1875, $4,230 82 

Appropriated and assessed in 1875, 1,000 00 



RECEIPTS. 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
Commons : 

From S. L. Ward, for grass, 10 00 

From Joel A. Abbott, for sale of grass,.. 101 00 
From Samuel A. McPhetres, for use of 

Common for circuses, etc., 321 50 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To Lewis D. Gumb, for labor and material 
furnished for new curbing around 
Park Common, as per contract,. . . . 1,745 00 

Appropriation for Water Works, for 

use of water (1874), 162 00 

Appropriation for Water Works, for 

use of water on South Common,. . . 611 00 

Appropriation for Water Works, for 
use of water for drinking hydrants, 
lead, labor, etc., 122 84 

Appropriation for Sewers and Drains, 
for sewer assessments on South and 
Summer streets, 853 32 

Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 
for engineering services, edgestone, 
street scrapings, labor, etc., 1,081 06 

Amount carried forward $4,575 22 



15,280 82 



432 50 

Transferred from Appropriation for Set- 
ting Trees, 81 87 



>,745 19 



110 auditor's report. 



Amount brought forward, $4,575 22 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To E. A. & A. T. Smith for concrete, .... 327 13 

Howes & Burnham, for lumber,. 4 86 

H. Whitney & Co., for lumber, 2 40 

H. R. Barker & Co., for water fixtures, 1 20 

Drew & Tibbets, for blacksmithing, ... 190 

F. Calvert, for water fixtures, labor, etc. 44 10 

Charles E. Adams, for lamps and globes, 22 75 
S. G. Mack & Co., for dippers, chain, 

etc., 5 91 

H. H. Wilder & Co., for copper bolts 

and labor, 17 10 

John Butcher, for iron, 70 

Joel A. Abbott, for selling grass, 13 50 

John A. Goodwin, for cash paid ex- 
penses of committee to Lawrence,.. 3 05 

F. H. Penniman, for teaming, » 7 50 

O. A. Simpson, for teaming, 3 00 

William Roberts, for teaming, 4 50 

James O'Brien, for labor, 52 50 

James Richmond, for labor, 48 00 



Whole expenditure for the year, 5,135 32 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1876, 609 87 

$5,745 19 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1875, $1,551 69 

Appropriated and assessed in 1875, .> 3,500 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Brown & Chase, for printing, 197 25 

Bacheller, Dumas & Co., for blank 
books, binding, ruling, printing, 
etc., 434 65 

Hunt Brothers, for two copies of 
Morning Times, from January 
1st, 1875, to December 15th, 
1875, 11 50 

Hunt Brothers, for printing and ad- 
vertising, 631 39 

Knapp & Morey, for printing (1300 

copies) Auditor's Report, 586 56 

Knapp & Morey, for two copies Daily 
Citizen, from January 1st, 1875, 
to January 1st, 1876, 10 00 

Knapp & More}% for printing and 

advertising, 225 85 

Lowell Daily Courier, for two copies, 
from January 1st, 1875, to Jan- 
uary 1st, 1876, 13 00 

Marden & Rowell, for printing and 

advertising, 678 37 

L. Prang & Co., for 600 plans, 15 00 

S. B. Simonds, for binding Auditor's 

Report (1300 copies) , 35 75 

S. B. Simonds, for binding (2000 

copies) Mayor's Address, 18 00 

Amount carried forward, $2,857 32 



1,051 69 



112 auditor's repokt. 



Amount brought forward, $2,857 32 

EXPENDITURES : 

Paid S. B. Simonds, for binding (400 

copies) Water Board Report, ... 900 

W. S. Simons, for posting notices, 

etc., 80 50 

Stone, Huse & Co. , for printing and 
advertising, 765 72 

Whole expenditure for the year, 3,712 54 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1876, 1,339 15 

$5,051 69 



LIGHTING STEEETS AND PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1875, $3,355 58 

Appropriated and assessed in 1875, ', 20,000 00 

$23,355 58 

RECEIPTS. 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
Lighting Streets and Public Buildings : 

From George Hobson, for lamp posts,. ... 14 00 

From S. P. Marin, for gas consumed in 

Ward Room No. 5, 

From Pevey Brothers, for old iron, . . . 
From Appropriation for Roads and 

Bridges, for labor, 

From Appropriation for Sewers and 

Drains, for labor,. 

From Appropriation for Commons, for 

labor, 

From Appropriation for Fire Department, 

for matches, 

Transferred from Reserved Fund, 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for LIGHTING STREETS : 

To Fred A. Bates, 902 50 

Fred Boynton, 48 00 

G. W. Bulmer, 100 06 

Scott Bickford, 29 96 

E. G. Child, 24 00 

John Crowley, 24 00 

Eugene Cunningham, 107 75 

Amount carried forward, $1,236 27 

15 



1 37 




13 95 




[ 

5 15 
i 




i 

3 75 




12 75 




6 24 






57 21 




2,000 00 




25,412 79 



114 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



Amount brought forward, SI, 236 27 

Paid for LIGHTING STREETS : 

To George Curtis, 16 00 

James M. Conuers, 5 76 

E. A. Davis, 26 40 

George W. Dana, 22 00 

C. E. Dodge, 35 95 

F. L. Farrington, 10 00 

B. H. Forbes, I 8 82 

John Gallagher, 24 00 

Enoch Gerrish, 66 26 

N.M.Herbert, 11 16 

George Hickey, 24 00 

Arthur Kennedy, 307 00 

William Kennedy, 447 00 

Allie Lang, 12 00 

R. J. McKenzie, 63 81 

C. E. Munn, 199 81 

F. W. Morrison, 20 00 

J. L. Pindar, 61 34 

F. A. Richardson, 131 47 

Willie Shehan 66 30 

Waldo Smith, 14 00 

Alexander Walker, 24 00 

Willie Woods, 136 25 

William Hunt, 8 75 



Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To Lowell Gas Light Company, for gas 

consumed in street burners during 

the year 1875,... 13,406 88 

Charles E. Adams, for lamps, globes, 

rivets, etc., 418 20 

H. R. Barker & Co., for gas fixtures, 

fittings, pipe, labor, etc., 157 86 

George L. Cady, for cap screws, labor, 

etc., 47 25 

* Cole & Nichols, for lamp posts, 143 00 

Pevey Brothers, for lamp posts, etc.,. . 200 90 
James Wight & Co., for lamp post 

cocks, labor, etc., 45 28 

H. H. Wilder & Co., for lantern frames, 

cans, lamps, repairing lanterns, etc., 246 87 
J. W. Bartlett, for street lamps, 17 12 

Amounts carried forward, $14,683 36 



2,978 35 



$2,978 35 



LIGHTING STREETS AND PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 115 

Amounts brought forward, $14,683 36 $2,978 35 

Paid for LIGHTING STREETS : 

To New England Gas Light Company, for 

burners, 21 00 

Globe Gas Light Company, for fix- 
tures, 21 00 

B. F. & C. E. Russell, for burners, re- 

ducers, jets and naphtha, 34 47 

C. B. Coburn & Co., for naphtha, spirits 

turpentine, glass, wicking, alcohol, 
oil, varnish, lead, brooms, brushes, 
paint, etc., 332 11 

L. C. Dodge, for polishing powder,.. .. 2 40 

Jonathan Kendall, for gasoline, 98 96 

Nichols & Fletcher, for matches, 20 80 

Henry C. Church, for paper, 35 

F. P. Coggeshall, for book and pencils, 1 75 

Fiske & Spalding, for lettering glasses, 

glazing, gilding, etc. , 16 92 

Thomas Kennedy, for painting lamp 

posts, 15 00 

A. K. Lynch, for street signs, 39 55 

M. Robbins, for painting wagon, 22 00 

Mark Holmes, Jr., for chestnut post 

and turning lamp posts, 23 65 

C. C. Thompson, for shoeing horse, etc., 3 75 

S. L. Butman, for blankets, sponge, 
brush, harness, robe, repairing har- 
nesses, etc., 101 02 

William H. Wiggin, for chestnut posts, 18 00 

George S. Butters, for exchange of 

horses, 130 00 

Sargent & Co.'s Express, for transpor- 
tation, 1 25 

Boston & Lowell and Nashua and Low- 
ell Railroad Company, for transpor- 
tation, 81 

Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 
for keeping horses, horse-shoeing, 
fuel, labor, etc., 678 47 

Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

stove and boiler, 15 00 

Appropriation for Water Works, for 

making lantern frames, 42 00 

16,323 62 

Amount carried forward, $19,301 97 



116 auditor's report. 

Amount brought forward, $19,301 97 

Paid for LIGHTING PUBLIC BUILD- 
INGS : 

To Lowell Gas Light Company, for gas,. . . 2,759 QQ 



2,759 66 

Whole expenditure for the year, 22,061 63 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1876, 3,351 16 

$25,412 79 



REPAIRS OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1875, $20,381 75 

Appropriated and assessed in 1875, 13,000 00 



RECEIPTS. 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
Repairs of Public Buildings : 

From Boston and Lowell Railroad Com- 
pany, for repairs on Huntington Hall 

building, 64 52 

From L. G. Howe, for desk, old material, 

lumber, use of ward room, etc., 24 43 

From T. Delany, for old counter, 2 00 

From S. P. Marin, for gas, .....' 2 20 

From John Boyle, for gas,. 1 25 

From G. Jockow, for chips,. . . , 2 50 

From A. H. Sederquist, for chips, 2 50 

From C. W. Chapman, for chips, 2 50 

From E. P. Brickett, for chips, 5 00 

From John H. Nichols, for chips, . 2 50 

From P. Quinn, for chips, 2 50 

From A. B. Carle, for chips, 2 50 

From A. M. Heath, for chips, 2 50 

From G. F. Hustick, for chips, 2 50 

From A. Scadding, for chips, 2 50 

From Appropriation for Schools, for labor 

and chips, 18 30 

From Appropriation for School Houses, 

for labor, 4 33 

From Appropriation for Fire Department, 

for lumber, nails and labor, 35 37 

Amount carried forward, 6179 70 



$,381 75 



118 auditor's report. 



Amount brought forward, $179 90 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
Repairs of Public Buildings : 

From Appropriation for Police, for lumber, 7 80 

From Appropriation for Water Works, for 

glass, paint and labor, 29 09 



Transferred from Appropriation for School 

Houses, 5,000 00 

Transferred from Reserved'Fund, 2,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for ALTERATIONS AND RE- 
PAIRS IN MARKET HOUSE BUILD- 
ING, FOR POLICE COURT ROOMS 
AND POLICE STATION: 

To Reserved Fund, for labor, .. . 1,220 10 

A. L. Brooks & Co., for lumber, 46 17 

Howes & Burnham, for lumber, 36 52 

C. W. Saunders & Co., for lumber, 26 40 

N. B. Favor & Son, for sash, 52 60 

Griffin, Lake & Gordon, for posts, rails, 

mouldings, labor, etc., 144 58 

Mark Holmes, Jr., for rosettes, brack- 
ets, etc., 59 50 

M. C. Pratt & Co., for lumber, doors, 

sash, blinds, mouldings, labor, etc., 922 94 
H. R. Barker & -Co., for boiler and 

heating apparatus, 2,539 16 

H. R. Barker & Co., for pipe, fixtures, 

labor, etc., 90 00 

Cole & Nichols, for sash weights, 18 52 

A. D. & O. N. Clark, for iron rods,.. . 8 40 

T. Costello & Co., for plumbing, 237 54 

Fielding & Bartlett, for hardware, 132 52 

T. R. Garrity & Co., for pipe, coup- 
lings, labor, etc., 8 79 

Jacob Rogers & Co., for hardware,. ... 28 59 

Horace B. Shattuck, for hardware,. ... 10 59 

Amount carried forward $5,582 92 



216 79 

7,000 00 
S40,598 54 



REPAIRS OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 119 



Amount brought forward, . $5 ,582 92 

Paid for ALTERATIONS AND RE- 
PAIRS IN MARKET HOUSE BUILD- 
ING, FOR POLICE COURT ROOMS 
AND POLICE STATION: 

S. Bean, for labor painting, 11 00 

A. L. Kittredge, for gilding, 7 50 

Wilder Leeman, for bronze, varnish, 

labor, etc., 58 80 

F. Frye & Co., for labor, 46 37 

A. W. Mead, for labor, 2 50 

George P. Trowbridge, for labor, 2 50 

D. M. Prescott & Co., for labor and 

material, 453 00 

C. B. Coburn & Co., for glass and win- 
dow cords, 82 86 

Jonathan Kendall, for glass, oil, etc.,. . 30 14 
William E. Livingston, for lime, sand 

and cement, 25 05 

C. H. Brown, for labor, 22 50 

James Leach, for teaming, 6 75 

William Roberts, for teaming, 37 50 

Adams & Company, for furniture, car- 
pets, etc., 700 37 



7,069 76 



aid for ALTERATIONS, REPAIRS, 
&c, IN HUNTINGTON HALL: 

To Reserved Fund, for labor, 1,868 67 

Appropriation for School Houses, for 

paint, varnish, etc., 63 91 

Appropriation for Water Works, for 

labor, 10 00 

A. L. Brooks & Co., for lumber, 493 19 

Howes & Burnham, for lumber, 438 00 

C. W. Saunders & Co., for lumber,. .. . 263 98 

H. Whitney & Co., for lumber, 124 88 

Griffin, Lake & Gordon, for posts, caps, 

rails, labor, etc., 478 75 

William Kelley , for doors, 13 00 

M. C. Pratt & Co., for lumber, mould- 
ing, sash, doors, labor, etc., 289 06 

Charles E. Adams, for brads,.. 2 82 

American Bolt Company, for bolts and 

rods, 211 52 

Amounts carried forward, $4,257 78 $7,069 76 



120 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $4,257 78 $7,069 76 

Paid for ALTERATIONS, REPAIRS, 
&c, IN HUNTINGTON HALL: 

To John Butcher, for iron, 14 51 

Cole & Nichols, for castings, 354 85 

Fielding & Bartlett, for hardware, 134 01 

J. C. Jockow, for stay irons, bolts and 

posts, 23 00 

Horace B. Shattuck, for hardware,. ... 34 73 
H. R. Barker & Co.,. for pipe, fixtures, 

labor, etc., 597 04 

T. Costello & Co., for plumbing, 193 75 

S. G. Mack & Co., for tin, solder and 

labor, 12 40 

Rice & Company, for wire netting, .... 10 20 

Clough & Sweatt, for stove and labor, 20 17 
Bennett & Moulton, for brick, cement, 

sand, labor, etc., , . 92 86 

D. M. Prescott & Co., for laths, lime, 

sand, plaster, hair, labor, etc.,- •• • 274 03 

C. B. Coburn & Co., for lead, glass, 
brushes, starch, whiting, magnesia, 

shellac, vermilion, etc., 61 20 

Jonathan Kendall, for glass, lead, 

bronze, vermilion, shellac, sponge, 

spirits turpentine, varnish, etc.,... 86 39 
Fiske & Spalding, for drawing paper 

and labor 44 30 

Brown & Carter, for labor,... 67 50 

William Kelley, for labor, 50 00 

Wilder Leeman, for labor, ............ 9 00 

D. Woodward, for labor, 15 00 

A. R. Bunton, for labor, 30 62 

A. Merriam, for chairs, 454 83 

Adams & Co., for furniture, carpets, etc. . 878 95 

7,717 12 



Paid for ALTERATIONS AND RE- 
PAIRS ON ARMORY BUILDING, 
MIDDLE STREET: 

To Reserved Fund, for labor,. ■ 2^918 83 

Appropriation for Police, for services 

of police officers, 30 25 

Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

labor, 10 00 

Amounts carried forward, $2,959 08 $14,786 88 



REPAIRS OF PCBLIC BUILDINGS. 121 



Amounts brought forward, $2,959 08 $14,786 88 

Paid for ALTERATIONS AND RE- 
PAIRS ON ARMORY BUILDING, 
MIDDLE STRICT: 

Appropriation for Water Works, for 

labor, 2 00 

H. & A. Whitney, for lumber, 857 74 

A. L. Brooks & Co., for lumber, 151 36 

Howes & Burnham, for lumber, 68 43 

C. W. Saunders & Co., for lumber,.... 1,133 75 

H. Whitney & Co., for lumber, 667 19 

N. B. Favor & Son, for doors and sash, 184 10 
Griffin, Lake & Gordon, for rails, brack- 
ets, etc., •• . 58 44 

Mark Holmes, Jr., for rosettes, 2 00 

William Kelley, for sash, . . . . : 51 00 

M. C. Pratt & Co., for lumber, circles, 

braces, moulding, blinds, &c, 562 50 

J. T. Carter & Co., for gun racks, 584 40 

Charles E. Adams, for hardware, 172 35 

Fielding & Bartlett, for hardware, 55 31 

Horace B. Shattuck, for hardware,.... 38 74 

H. R. Barker & Co., for heating ap- 
paratus, 745 84 

H. R. Barker & Co., for gas and water 

fixtures, labor, etc., 298 21 

John Butcher, for iron, 5 85 

A. D. & O. N. Clark, for rods, bolts, 

labor, etc., 82 31 

Cole & Nichols, for castings, 66 28 

J. C. Jockow, for blacksmithing, ...... 6 00 

S. G. Mack & Co., for plumbing, con- 
ductors, gutters, etc., 209 87 

H. H. Wilder & Co., for plumbing, 

water fixtures, labor, etc., 575 01 

Bennett & Moulton, for material and 

labor, as per contract, 3,477 00 

Bennett & Moulton, for brick, cement 

and labor, 95 40 

Clough & Sweatt, for stone and labor, 135 57 

Charles E. Dame, for mason work and 

material, 145 00 

D. M. Prescott & Co., for mason work 

and material, . 51 90 



Amounts carried forward, $13,442 63 $14,786 88 



122 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, » $13,442 63 $14,786 88 

Paid for ALTERATIONS AND RE- 
PAIRS ON ARMORY BUILDING, 
MIDDLE STREET: 

To C. B. Coburn & Co., for shellac, alco- 
hol, glass, varnish, brushes, glue, 

etc.,... 221 57 

Jonathan Kendall, for glass, varnish 

lead, whiting, etc.,. 341 67 

William E. Livingston, for cement and 

stone, , 21 25 

Adams & Co., for desks and chairs,.. . 194 00 

Artemas Merriam, for settees, . . 53 76 

James Boyd, for labor, .............. 37 64 

Robert Goulding, for slating, 406 17 

Sugden Herbert, for labor, 42 75 

L. & L. J. Richards, for labor, . ....... 98 25 

O. A, Simpson, for plank and labor,. .. 80 70 



14,940 21* 

Paid for ALTERATIONS AND RE- 
PAIRS IN ARMORIES IN MARKET 
HOUSE BUILDING : 

To Reserved Fund, for labor, 

A. L. Brooks & Co., for lumber,. ..... 

Howes & Burnham, for lumber, 

C. W. Saunders & Co., for lumber,. . . . 
M. C. Pratt & Co., for lumber and labor, 
Griffin, Lake & Gordon, for lumber and 

labor, 

William Kelley, for sash, 

H. R. Barker & Co., for pipe, fixtures, 

labor, etc., , 

Cole & Nichols, for castings, 

Fielding & Bartlett, for hardware, . 
Horace B. Shattuck, for nails and 

paper, 

T. Costello & Co., for plumbing,. . 
S. G. Mack & Co., for stoppers,. . 
George Jockow, for making desks, 
S. D. Butterworth, for laths, nails, labor, 

etc., 

Wilder Leeman, for labor, 

Amounts carried forward, . ... $2,217 78 $29,727 17. 



681 


25 


38 


60 


6 


00 


363 


86 


9 


00 


i 

24 


40 


10 


50 


259 


78 


8 


00 


27 


89 


12 


02 


538 


73 


1 


25 


61 


75 


149 


25 


25 


50 



REPAIRS OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 123 



Amounts brought forward, $2,217 78 $29,727 17 

Paid for ALTERATIONS AND RE- 
PAIRS IN ARMORIES IN MARKET 
HOUSE BUILDING: 

To C. B. Coburn & Co., for lead, bronze, 
umber, felting, whiting, varnish, 
spirits turpentine, shellac, japan, 

etc., . 64 75 

Jonathan Kendall, for graining color, 

starch and magnesia, 1 64 

S. Bean, for labor, 30 00 

2,314 17 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To Reserved Fund, for labor, 892 05 

Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 
for labor, sand, sidewalk assess- 
ment, etc., 680 49 

Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

labor, 13 00 

Appropriation for Sewers and Drains, 
for sewer assessment on Merrimack 

street, 201 85 

Appropriation for Water Works, for 

use of water and labor, 18 30 

A. L. Brooks & Co., for lumber, 259 89 

Howes & Burnham, for lumber, 683 78 

C. W. Saunders & Co., for lumber,. ... 84 55 

H. & A. Whitney, for lumber, 60 92 

H. Whitney & Co., for lumber, 121 29 

Milton Aldrich, for ladder rounds, etc., 6 52 

A. Bachelder & Co., for moulding, 94 

J. W. Bennett, for roofing and collars, 33 47 
J. T. Carter & Co., for moulding,. .... 1 50 
Crosby Furniture Company, for mould- 
ings, pulls, etc., 3 40 

Mark Holmes, Jr., for turning circles, 5 00 
William Kelley, for doors and sash,. ... 14 00 
M. C. Pratt &' Co., for lumber, mould- 
ing, doors, sash, labor, etc., 267 15 

Parker & Cheney, for oak column,.... 5 50 

S. H. Weaver, for roofing, 40 56 

Charles E. Adams, for hardware, 26 49 

Fielding & Bartlett, for hardware, 6 98 

Jacob Rogers & Co., for hardware,. ... 63 32 



Amounts carried forward, $3,490 95 $32,041 34 



124 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought ?f orward,. .. $3,490 95 $32,041 34 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To Horace B. Shattuck, for hardware,. ... 113 10 

Rice & Company, for wire cloth, 29 25 

H. R. Barker & Co., for pipe, fixtures, 

labor, etc., 638 54 

Cole & Nichols, for grates, 70 89 

John Butcher, for iron and steel, 2 54 

J. C. Jockow, for hoisting-clamps, bolts, 

etc., 6 50 

S. G. Mack & Co., for pipe, lead, sol- 
der, basin, conductor, labor, etc.,. . 115 68 

H. H. Wilder & Co., for lantern frame, 

pans, putty, solder, labor, etc.,. ... 23 90 

C. C. Thompson, for shoeing horse,. ... 4 20 

Sweatt & Clark, for wagon seat and 

cushion, 20 50 

Buttrick & Co., for soap, 17 

C. B. Coburn & Co., for shellac, ben- 
zine, alcohol, spirits turpentine, 
varnish, japan, oil, lead, zinc, 
bronze, glue, baskets, brushes, 
magnesia, graining colors, sash 
cord, sponge, vermilion, waste, 
etc., 303 02 

Fiske & Spalding, for labor, 184 09 

Jonathan Kendall, for glass, varnish* 
turpentine, benzine, shellac, japan, 
alcohol, oil, lead, zinc, vermilion, 
carmine, copperas, etc., 124 11 

William E. Livingston, for lime, cement 

and brick,-..- . 19 30 

C. P. Talbot & Co., for soda-ash, pot- 

ash and muriatic acid, 6 52. 

Albert Wheeler & Co., for salt, 138 

J. R. Hayes, for condition powders and 

ginger, 7 40 

H. C. Church, for books, paper, ink and 

waste, 7 33 

Clough & Sweatt, for stone and labor, 14 20 

Warren C. Crosby, for drain pipe,.... 9 52 

Frye & Kittredge, for pipe, cement, 

sand and labor, 44 39 

D. M. Prescott & Co., for mason work 

and material, 583 55 

Amounts carried forward, $5,821 03 $32,041 34 



REPAIRS OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



12 



Amounts brought forward, $5,821 03 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To Robert Goulding, for slate, lead, zinc, 

solder, labor, etc 148 28 

Benner Brothers, for carpet, chairs, 
feather dusters, curtains, fixtures, 

etc., «~. 85 25 

W. T. Bradley, for safe, 150 00 

S. Bean, for labor, 17 50 

Brewn & Carter, for labor, 65 00 

John E. Morris, for labor, 4 00 

James Cowell, for teaming, 7 00 

James Leach, for teaming, 2 25 

J. C. Little, for teaming, 4 50 

Daniel McCarthy, for teaming, 75 

W. B. Moffatt, for teaming, 75 

William Roberts, for teaming,. ........ 101 25 

F. S. Smith, for teaming, 2 00 

C. H. Whitney, for teaming, 4 50 

John C. Bennett, for numbering doors, 2 25 

Frank E. Cleaveland, for labor, 2 50 

W. G-. Cleaves, for labor, " 21 87 

Charles E. Dow, for labor on boilers,. . 28 00 

John Douglass, for labor, 7 00 

Charles G. Day, for labor, 2 25 

G. S. Butters, for horse,. ..',.. 200 00 

L. G. Howe, for cash paid for labor, 

and expenses of committee to Bos- 
ton, , 25 75 

L. G. Howe, for keeping horse, 103 00 

John H. McAlvin, for cash paid for 

recording deed, 75 

Proprietors of Urban block, for rent of 

store, ... 37 50 

Whole expenditure for the year, 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1876, 



52,041 34 



6,844 93 

38,886 27 
1,712 27 



40,598 54 



CITY LIBRARY. 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1875,. ..... . $1,366 30 

Appropriated and assessed in 1875, 1,500 00 

RECEIPTS. 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
CITY LIBRARY : 

From County of Middlesex, on account of 

dog licenses of 1874, 2,553 60 

From Marshall H. Clough, Librarian, for 

subscriptions, 878 50 

From Marshall II. Clough, Librarian, for 

catalogues, 85 50 

From Marshall H. Clough, Librarian, for 

supplements, 34 90 

From Marshall H. Clough, Librarian, for 

fines, 39 10 

From Marshall H. Clough, Librarian, for 

lostbooks, 12 35 

From Marshall H. Clough, Librarian, for 

paper, 6 70 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Marshall H. Clough, Librarian, (sal- 
ary), 1,200 00 

Marshall H. Clough, Librarian, for 

clerk hire, 300 00 



$2,866 30 



3,610 65 
*6,476 95 



1,500 00 



Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To H. Hosford, for rent of rooms in Ma- 
sonic Temple building, 1,200 00 

H. Hosford, for heating rooms, 200 00 

Amounts carried forward, $1 ,400 00 $1,500 00 



CITY LIBRARY. 127 



Amounts brought forward, $1,400 00 $1,500 00 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To Lowell Gas Light Company, for gas,. .. 173 95 
M. H. Clough, for cash paid for books, 
cleaning rooms, soap, matches, post- 
age stamps and expressage, 76 63 

F. P. Coggeshall, for books and sta- 
tionery, 890 09 

J. B. Beers & Co., for atlas of Middle- 
sex County, 12 00 

A. Whitney, for tracing cloth and t paper 

knife, 2 62 

Joshua Merrill & Son, for binding 

books, 38 95 

Henry C. Church, for paper, 1 00 

G. W. Pease & Co., for paper, 70 29 

F. & E. Bailey & Co., for dextrine,. . . 3 30 

French & Puffer, for cuspadores, 7 50 

H. R. Barker & Co., for gas fixtures 

and labor, 7 57 

George Thatcher, for repairing clock,.. 1 00 

Samuel Spalding, for cleaning carpet, . . 2 00- 

Bacheller, Dumas & Co., for blank 

books and binding, 166 45 

Hunt Brothers, for advertising, 1 75 

Knapp & Morey, for advertising, 2 00 

Marden & Rowell, for printing and ad- 
vertising, 15 13 

Stone, Huse & Co., for printing (1500 

copies) supplement to catalogue,.. 169 05 

Stone, Huse & Co., for printing and 

advertising, 13 00 

Appropriation for Schools, for feather 

duster, 3 50 

Appropriation for Water Works, for 

use of water, 7 00 

3,064 78 

Whole expenditure for the year, 4,564 78 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1876, 1,912 17 



5,476 95 



SALARIES. 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1875, $2,743 53 

Appropriated and assessed in 1875, 20,000 00 

$22,743 53 

Transferred from Reserved Fund, 1,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Francis Jewett, Mayor, 2,500 00 

John H, McAlvin, Treasurer and Col- 
lector, 2,500 00 

John H. McAlvin, for clerk hire, 500 00 

Samuel A. McPhetres, City Clerk,.. . 2,000 00 

Samuel A. McPhetres, for clerk hire, 300 00 
David Chase, Auditor and Clerk of 

Common Council, 2,000 00 

David Chase, for clerk hire, 300 00 

John F. McEvoy, City Solicitor, .... 250 00 

George F. Richardson, Cit}' Solicitor, 1,250 00 
Lorenzo G. Howe, Superintendent of 

Public Buildings, . 1,600 00 

John H. Nichols, Messenger to the 

City Council, 1,200 00 

Hermon J. Smith, City Physician and 

Superintendent of Burials, 700 00 

John A. Knowles, Jr., Sealer of 

Weights and Measures, 300 00 

John A. Knowles, Jr., Inspector of 

Milk, 150 00 

Sylvester Crosb}', Pound Keeper,. . .. 25 00 
Francis Go ward, Chairman of the 

Board of Assessors, 1,000 00 

James Marren, Assessor, 800 00 

Isaac A. Fletcher, Assessor, 800 00 

Amount carried forward, $18,175 00 



$23,743 53 



SALARIES. 129 



Amount brought forward, $18,175 00 

SALARIES : 

Paid William W. Read, Assessor, 800 00 

Levi B. Stevens, Assessor, 800 00 

Board of Assessors, for clerk hire,.. . 1,000 00 

Whole expenditure for the year, 20,775 00 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1876, 2,968 53 

$23,743 53 



17 



SETTING TREES. 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1875, $81 87 

681 87 



TRANSFER. 

Transferred to Appropriation for Com- 
mons, , 81 87 

81 87 



HEALTH ACCOUNT. 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1875, $1,081 54 

Appropriated and assessed in 1875, 2,500 00 



RECEIPTS. 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
HEALTH ACCOUNT: 

From Joseph Barrett, for labor, 13 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for PUBLIC BATHING HOUSES : 

To Reserved Fund, for labor, 88 74 

Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

labor, 15 00 

John Butcher, for bolts and chain, .... 2601 

Howes & Burnham, for lumber, 37 85 

C. B. Coburn & Co., for oil .casks, oil, 

lanterns, wicks and rope, 5$ 04 

Fielding and Bartlett, for lock and 

keys, • 1 00 

S. G. Mack & Co., for repairing lan- 
tern, 

Miller Brothers, for oil and matches,. .. 

Horace B. Shattuck, for nails, 

Joseph Raynes & Co., for police badge, 

John Donahue, for use of boats, . . . 

W. G. Howe, for labor, 

James Leach, for teaming, , 

William Roberts, for teaming, 

Amount carried forward, » $311 92 





vo 




72 


11 


25 


2 


50 


10 


00 


47 


86 




75 


10 


75 



,581 54 



13 00 
3,594 54 



132 auditor's report. 



Amount brought forward, $311 22 

Paid for PUBLIC BATHING HOUSES : 

To James Duffy, for services at bathing 

house, Lawrence street, 149 60 

Owen F. Havey, for services at bathing 

house, Lawrence street, 17 00 

Mrs. A. B. Whitney, for services at 

bathing house, Centralville, 97 00 



Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 
for labor with teams, cleaning al- 
leys, etc., 339 00 

Joseph Barrett, for labor, 248 51 

William Donovan, for labor, 259 00 

W. S. Simons, for posting bills, 3 75 



574 82 



850 26 



Whole expenditure for the year, 1,425 08 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1876, 2,169 46 

$3,594 54 



STATE AID, 
FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS AND SAILORS, &G 



Paid to Disabled Soldiers and Sailors and 
their Families, and for the Families of 
the Slain, under an Act of the Legisla- 
ture of the Commonwealth, chapter 172, 
approved April 23, 1866 (as per resolu- 
tion of the City Council ) : 

Due from the Commonwealth, Jan. 1, 1875, $25,397 84 

$25,397 84 

RECEIPTS. 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
STATE AID : 

From Sarah A. Davis (overdraft), 4 00 

From Jane Bush (overdraft), 8 00 

From J. L. Edds (overdraft), 3 00 

From J. H. Wilson (overdraft), 8 00 

From W. A. Loomis (overdraft), 15 00 

From James Teelan (overdraft), 24 00 

From James M. Whitney (overdraft) ..... 8 00 

From J. Christy (overdraft), 4 00 

From Commonwealth, reimbursement State 

Aid, 14,447 51 

14,521 51 

$10,876 33 



EXPENDITURES. 

To amount paid as per Resolution in 1875, 13,399 68 



13,399 68 



Due from Commonwealth, January 1, 1876, $24,276 01 



WATER WORKS. 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1875, $54,624 14 

Appropriated and assessed in 1875, 40,000 00 



RECEIPTS. 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
WATER WORKS: 

For use of water and service pipe,. . . ... 93,094 35 

From Appropriation for Schools, for labor, 5 50 

From Appropriation for School Houses, 

for labor and pipe, 56 79 

From Appropriation for Roads and 

Bridges, for labor, etc. , 8 30 

From Appropriation for Fire Department, 

for labor, etc., 70 35 

From Appropriation for Sewers and 

Drains, for labor and pipe 191 44 

From Appropriation for Lighting Streets 

and Public Buildings, for labor, 1 19 44 

From Appropriation for Repairs of Public 

Buildings, for labor, 26 80 

From Appropriation for Commons, for 

labor, 40 

From G. S. Butters, for labor, 10 80 

From Bennett and Moulton, for labor,. ... 2 20 

From Wilder Bennett, for labor, 1 20 

From C. A. Bailey, for pork, 31 33 

From A. Bachelder & Co., for kyanizing, 

labor, etc., 1 78 98 

From Boston and Lowell Railroad Com- 

pany, for labor, 

From A. E. Conant, for labor, 

From C. J. Cheney, for labor, 

From George E. Evans, for pipe and labor, 
From Frye & Kittredge, for labor, 

Amounts carried forward,. ...,» 



$94,624 14 



52 06 




20 00 




6 15 




11 44 




32 40 




$93,919 93 


$94,624 14 



WATER WORKS. 135 



Amounts brought forward, $93,919 93 $94,624 14 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
WATER WORKS : 

From Luther Kittredge, for labor, 14 85 

From J. B. Francis, for labor, 18 20 

From F. E. French, for blacksmithing,. . . 29 35 

From G. L. Fowler, for labor, 11 55 

From S. P. Griffin, for labor, hay, etc...... 105 00 

From T. R. Garity & Co., for service 

box, 80 

From Daniel Gage, for labor, 4 25 

From Halladay & Vreeland, for labor,. ... 1 86 

From H. A. Hildreth, for labor, 8 55 

From C. I. Hood & Co., for service box,. . 55 

From L. G. Howe, for labor, 1 75 

From Nelson Holmes, for rent, 276 00 

From Lowell Machine Shop, for sleeve,.. . 2 28 

From Jonathan Ladd, for pipe, 3 94 

From J. L. Moulton, for labor and dualin, 16 06 
From Massachusetts Cotton Mills, for labor, 

etc., 5 00 

From Merrimack Print Works, for pipe, .. . 75 04 

From Middlesex Company, for pipe, 9 61 

From Nichols & Hutchins, for rammer,. . . 1 35 

From J. Nichols, for wrench, 1 50 

From Norcross & Saunders, for kyan- 

izing, 5 45 

From Pevey Brothers, for pipe, 1 88 

From Proprietors of Locks and Canals on 

Merrimack River, for labor, etc., 131 95 

From C. B. Richmond & Co., for pipe, 16 80 

From Levi Sprague, for grass and hay,. . . 30 70 

From N. T. Staples & Sons, for labor, 5 20 

From Charles Stott, for labor, 11 25 

From Suffolk and Tremont Mills, for labor, 5 50 

From E. A. Thissell, for labor, 4 90 

From Wamesit Steam Mills, for labor and 

pipe, 28 33 

From William Walker, for labor, 3 10 

From S. N. Wood & Co., for old pipe, 5 66 

From fees for shutting off and letting on 

water, „ 150 00 

— 94,908 14 

Transferred from Reserved Fund, 110,000 00 



$299,532 28 



136 auditor's report. 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid S. P. Griffin, Superintendent, (sal- 
ary) from May 1st to December 31st, 

1875, 1,200 00 

1,200 00 

Paid for LABOR, as per monthly pay rolls : 

In January, 2,002 11 

February, 1,338 55 

March, 1,456 67 

April, 1,719 14 

May, 2,147 18 

June, 2,174 16 

July 2,359 30 

August, 2,482 21 

September, , 3,011 17 

October, 2,663 38 

November, 2,732 13 

December, 1,431 66 

25,517 66 

Paid for INTEREST : 

To Lowell Institution for Savings, interest 

(on three notes), 25,100 00 

City Institution for Savings, interest 

(on note),....r 1,625 00 

Interest on Lowell Water Loan Bonds 

(coupons),.... 78,840 00 

105,565 00 

Paid for DAMAGES : 

To Stevens, Dockham & Co., as per reso- 
lution, 5,000 00 

Lowell Gas Light Company, for dam- 
ages caused by laying water pipe in 
Appleton and Railroad streets,. ... 14 74 

Estate of Fisher A. Hildreth, for dam- 
age to estate caused by construction 
of Water Works, and interest, 6,084 17 

Bridget Donahoe, for damage to her 

estate on Sixth street, 200 00 

Gardner L. Willard, for damage to his 

estate and interest, 2,471 57 

Alfred Brown et ux., for damage to their 

estate and interest, 1 ,756 70 

Amounts carried forward, $15,527 18 $132,282 66 



WATER WORKS. 137 



Amounts brought forward, $15,527 18 $132,282 66 

Paid for DAMAGES : 

To Abrara French, for damage to his estate 

on Middlesex street, 120 56 

Josiah B. French, for damage to his 

estate and interest, 2,800 70 

Sarah A. Bod well et al., for damage to 

their estate, 3,700 00 

G. F. Richardson, for cash paid wit- 
nesses in case Dockham et al. vs. 
City of Lowell, 19 22 

Alfred Day, for cash paid witnesses in 
case Franklin et al. vs. City of 
Lowell, .".... 9 40 

Proprietors of Locks and Canals on 
Merrimack River, and other Corpor- 
ations, as per resolution of City 
Council, passed Dec. 31st, 1875,.. . 50,000 00 

72,177 06 

Paid for PIPE, HYDRANTS, WATER 
GATES, VALVES, &c. : 

To Boston Machine Co., for flush hydrants, 

water gates, valves, etc., 3,875 49 

Boston Lead Co., for lead and solder,. . 1,149 95 

Cole & Nichols, for gate frames, covers, 

pipe, reducers, etc., 154 57 

Dalton & Ingersoll, for stops and bibb, 17 12 

L. W. Faulkner & Son, for pipe,. ..... 4 34 

Lowell Machine Shop, for brass screws 

and pipe, 58 43 

Morris Tasker & Co., for pipe, ells, 

plugs, crosses, etc.,. 2,301 31 

Pattee & Perkins, for double hydrant,. . 51 50 

Pevey Brothers, for trydrant covers, gate 

covers and frames, service caps, etc., 458 98 

N. T. Staples & Sons, for drain pipe,. . 39 13 

Jesse W. Starr & Sons, for pipe, caps, 

sleeves, etc., 20,528 58 

Union Water Meter Co., for meters, 

couplings, etc., 436 50 

R. D. Wood & Co., for pipe, sleeves, 

reducers, etc., 6,025 69 

Henry R. Worthington, for screws, pack- 
ing, meters, etc., 783 56 

Amounts carried forward, $35,885 15 $204,459 72 

18 



138 auditor's report. 

Amounts brought forward, $35,885 15 $204,459 72 

Paid for PIPE, HYDRANTS, WATER 
GATES, VALVES, &c. : 

To D. H. Wilson & Co., for pipe, solder and 

labor, 11 40 

James Wight & Co., for cocks, 2 25 

Boston & Lowell and Nashua & Lowell 

Railroad Co., for freight on pipe, etc., 1,623 75 

Framingham & Lowell Railroad Co , for 

freight on castings, 40 77 

Sargent & Co.'s Express, for transporta- 
tion, • 2 25 

37,565 57 

Paid for NEW PUMPING ENGINE : 

To Henry R. Worthington, on account of 

pumping engine, as per contract,.. . 17,000 00 

17,000 00 

Paid for FUEL : 

To Daniel Gage, for wood, 260 99 

E. A. Hill, for sawdust, 12 00 

William Kittredge, for coal, 44 86 

William E. Livingston, for coal, 3,067 69 

Bernard Riley, for coal, 62 40 

3,447 94 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To John Butcher, for iron, steel, borax, etc., 171 68 

A. D. & O. N. Clark, for rods, bolts, etc., 12 75 
Dodge, Gilbert & Co., for iron, steel, 

borax, etc., 196 55 

Richard Dobbins, for iron, rivets, labor, 

etc., 260 50 

Shapley Morgan, for heater- and iron,.. 198 90 

Thomas Firth & Sons, for steel, 91 04 

John N. Pierce, for drill, 20 00 

S. C. Smith, for screws and taps, 9 00 

Fairbanks, Brown & Co., for scales,.. . 56 00 

Charles E. Adams, for hardware, 33 68 

F. E. Bennett, for shovels, 7 00 

Fielding & Bartlett, for hardware, 92 10 

Rice & Co., for coal screen, 9 00 

Horace B. Shattuck, for lead and hard- 
ware, 909 43 

Amounts carried forward, $2,067 63 1262,473 23 



WATER WORKS. 139 



Amounts brought forward, $2,067 63 $262,473 23 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To Horace R. Barker & Co., for sidewalk 

cocks, tees, sockets, unions, plugs, 

waste, boiler, labor, etc., 2,095 48 

T. Costello & Co., for lead pipe, solder, 

labor, etc., 45 58 

H. H. Wilder & Co., for lead pipe, pump, 

solder, tin, labor, etc., • 95 53 

S. G. Mack & Co., for fence castings, 

lead, labor, etc 37 81 

N. J. Wier & Co., for labor on stove,. . 1 00 

Sager Ashworth & Co., for recntting files, 4 56 

J. H. Haskell, for filing saws, 7 35 

George Thatcher, for banging bells and 

cleaning clock, 7 00 

George H. Convers, for repairing har- 

nesses, carriages, etc.. 117 -01 

Ross & Jewett, for repairing wagon,.-. 6 25 

Milton Aldricb, for turning plug, 125 

Amos Green, for spokes, pick bandies, 

etc., 7 94 

Brad}^ Brothers, for plug, 1 25 

A. Bachelder & Co., for hydrant boxes, 

lumber, moulding, labor, etc., 575 61 

Howes & Burnham, for lumber, 4 72 

C. W. Saunders & Co., for stop-cock 

boxes, lumber, etc., 558 43 

George W. Pearson, for lumber, hard- 
ware, labor, etc., 142 22 

Proprietors of Locks and Canals on 
Merrimack River, for kyanizing lum- 
ber, 269 61 

Frye & Kittredge, for cement, sand and 

labor 122 62 

John G. Ham, for mason work, 7 50 

Ira Hartwell, for mason work, 17 00 

D. M. Prescott & Co., for mason work, 5 25 
Runals, Davis & Foster, for stone,. ... 218 69 
Cheney & Tallant, for concrete, 1 80 

E. A. & A. T. Smith, for concrete, 115 43 

Halladay & Vreeland, for laying water 

pipe, 1,669 92 

William Waugh, for slate, zinc and 

labor, , 21 83 

Amounts carried forward, $8,226 .27 $262,473 23 



140 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, , . $8,226 27 $262,473 23 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To William E. Livingston, for brick, ce- 
ment, sand, lime, grain, etc., 210 76 

C. B. Coburn & Co., for oil, benzine, 
varnish, spirits turpentine, lead, 
packing, fire clay, brushes, feather 
dusters, candles, etc., 326 53 

Samuel Horn & Co., for tallow, 24 73 

Leonard & Ellis, for oil, 55 95 

H. M. & J. Rice & Co., for tallow 48 60 

Fiske & Spalding, for oil, spirits tur- 
pentine, varnish, paints, brushes, 
lanterns, labor, etc., 434 29 

Josiah Gates & Sons, for leather, 12 39 

L. C. Dodge, for polishing powder,. ... 2 00 

Henry C. Church, for books, stationery, 

waste, etc., 24 60 

Rogers & Lord, for grain, 4 40 

Stiles, Rogers & Co., for oatmeal, 8 45 

Boott Cotton Mills, for waste, 10 09 

Middlesex Company, for waste, 1 00 

S. P. Griffin, for traveling expenses, ex- 
pressing, telegrams, postage stamps, 
County atlas, use of horse, etc.,. . . 361 19 

Lowell Gas Light Company, for gas, 

cement, pipe, labor, etc.,, 48 24 

Charles L. Andrews, for dualin, 50 00 

Nichols & Fletcher, for powder, fuse, 
salt, brooms, matches, grass seed 
and candles, 1 75 90 

George H. Sampson, for powder, 89 60* 

Bacheller, Dumas & Co., for blank 

books, printing, binding, etc., 68 61 

Brown & Chase, for printing, , 30 50 

Hunt Brothers, for printing and adver- 
tising, 43 12 

Knapp & Morey, for printing and ad- 
vertising, 11 25 

Marden & Rowell, for printing and ad- 
vertising, 33 42 

Stone, Huse & Co., for printing, 31 62 

S. B. Simonds, for binding reports,. . . 4 50 

Clerk of Courts, Middlesex County, for 

recording, 11 35 

Middlesex County, N. D., Registry of 

Deeds, for recording, 4 25 

Amounts carried forward, $10,353 61 $262,473 23 



WATER WORKS. 141 



Amounts brought forward, $10,353 61 8262,473 23 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To John H. McAlvin, for cash paid for 

recording deed, 65 

F. P. Coggeshall, for blank books, sta- 

tionery, etc. , 22 55 

Aaron R. Gay & Co., for rubber bands, 1 40 
Joshna Merrill & Son, for blank books, 

etc., 11 80 

Henry Moulton & Co., for ladders,. ... 11 38 
William Whitmore, for stencil figures, 

brush and ink, 1 28 

Adams & Co., for carpeting, 3 75 

C. H. Frost, for brooms, 3 50 

Merchants' National Bank, for rent,. . . 412 50 

George L. Huntoon, for hack hire,. ... 8 00 

H. O. Morse, for use of horse, , . 13 50 

E. J. Noyes, for use of horse and sleigh, 6 00 

G. W. Norris, for straw, 8 31 

John C. Bennett, for numbering doors, 1 25 

James Critchett, for labor, 2 00 

W. Brown, for labor, , . 4 37 

John Francis, for labor, 24 75 

Samuel Sweatt, for labor, 16 40 

James Leach, for teaming, 1 50 

G. E. Stanley, for teaming 18 80 

O. A. Simpson, for teaming, etc., 267 77 

George E. Evans, for traveling ex- 
penses, telegrams, etc., 4 55 

C. H. Latham, for cash paid for ex- 
penses to New York, 17 00 

Nichols & Hutchins, for entertainment 
of Water Commissioners from Law- 
rence, 2 50 

John Ayer, for amount overpaid on 

water bill, 27 62 

Boott Cotton Mills, for amount over- 
paid on water bill, 1 00 

Isaac Cartmel, for amount overpaid on 

water bill, 1 88 

Gilman Kimball, for amount overpaid 

on water bill, 50 

H. P. Clough, for amount overpaid on 

water bill, 3 00 



Amounts carried forward, $11 ,253 1 2 $262,473 23 



142 auditor's report. 



Amounts brought forward, $11,253 12 $262,473 23 

Paid for SUNDRIES : 

To John McLarney, for amount overpaid 

on water bill, 3 00 

Mechanics' Savings Bank, for amount 

overpaid on water bill, 20 00 

Patrick Plunkett, for amount overpaid 

on water bill, 5 00 

J. M. G. Parker, for amount overpaid 

on water bill 9 00 

Joel Spalding, for amount overpaid on 

water bill, 7 00 

Wing Brothers, for amount overpaid on 

water bill,, 17 42 

A. C. Wlieelock, for amount overpaid 

on water bill, 138 74 

Joseph Whiteley, for amount overpaid 

on water bill, - 5 00 

E. A. Thissell, for amount overpaid for 

shoeing horse, 1 75 

Appropriation for Schools, for desk,. . . 2 00 

Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 
for engineering services from Jan- 
uary 1st to December 1st, 1875,.. . 475 00 

Appropriation for Roads and Bridges, 

for edgestone, sand, fillingjabor, etc., 265 85 

Appropriation for Fire Department, for 

teaming pipe, etc., 901 29 

Appropriation for Repairs of Public 
Buildings, for lumber, nails, paint, 
varnish, glass, labor, etc., 29 09 

Reserved Fund, for labor and glass,.. .. 54 29 

13,187 55 

* Whole expenditure for the year, 275,660 78 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1876,., ... . 23,871 50 



$299,532 28 



*Expended in 1870 $95,057 00 

Expended in 1871, 624,151 66 

Expendedin 1872, 560,708 40 

Expended in 187o 349,717 87 

Expended in 1874, 233,370 63 

Expendedin 1875, - 275,660 7S 

Whole amount expended to January 1st, 1876 2,138,666 34 

Less amount received from various sources, 262,537 84 

Making net cost of Water Works to January 1, 1876 $1,876,128 50 



CORPORATION TAX. 



Balance unappropriated January 1, 1875, $4,553 87 



RECEIPTS. 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
CORPORATION TAX : 

From Commonwealth, on account of taxes 
on Corporation Stocks for 1874, collected 
by the State, 572 95 

From Commonwealth, on account of taxes 
on Corporation Stocks for 1875, collected 
by the State, 26,299 60 



$4,553 87 



26,872 55 



Balance unappropriated January 1, 1876, $31,426 42 



NATIONAL BANK TAX. 



Balance unappropriated January 1, 1875, $5,385 28 
Amount assessed on Stocks in National 

Banks owned by non-residents, ........ 21,583 53 

RECEIPTS. 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
NATIONAL BANK TAX: 

From Commonwealth, on account of Na- 
tional Bank Tax of 1875, 4,276 57 



PAYMENTS. 



$26,968 81 



4,276 57 
11,245 38 



Paid Commonwealth, on account of Na- 
tional Bank Tax of 1874, 168 39 

Commonwealth, on account of Na- 
tional Bank Tax of 1875, 21 ,357 04 

21,525 43 

Balance unappropriated January 1, 1876, 9,719 95 

$31,245 38 



CITY DEBT. 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1875, $9,989 47 



EECEIPTS. 

Eeceived into the Treasury on account of 
CITY DEBT : 

From Lowell Institution for Savings, 10,000 00 

Transferred from Reserved Fund, 510 53 



PAYMENTS. 

Paid County of Middlesex, amount of as- 
sessment for the construction of 
a bridge across the Merrimack 

River at Tyngsborough, 10,000 00 

City Institution for Savings, 10,500 00 



1,989 47 



10,510 53 
$20,500 00 



20,500 00 



19 



INTEREST ON CITY DEBT. 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1875, $9,667 86 

Appropriated and assessed in 1875, 30,000 00 

$39,667 86 

RECEIPTS. 

Received into the Treasury on account of 
CITY DEBT: 

From Appleton National Bank, for interest 
on daily balances from July 1, 1874, to 
July 1, 1875 8,204 89 

From Lowell Five Cents Savings Bank, ... 32 50 

From Commonwealth, for interest on State 

tax, paid before it was due, 385 80 

8,623 19 



5,291 05 



PAYMENTS. 

Paid to City Institution for Savings, 13,179 55 

Salem Savings Bank, 1,625 00 

Mechanics Savings Bank, 2,275 00 

Lowell Institution for Savings, .. . 13,525 83 

Lowell Five Cents Savings Bank,. 2,725 00 
Trustees of the will of Thomas 

Nesmith, 1,500 00 

Trustees of the will of Thomas 

Nesmith (High Street Church), 60 00 

Edward Ordway, Trustee, 97 50 

Appleton National Bank (on tem- 
porary loan), 177 92 

35,165 80 

Balance undrawn January 1, 1876, 13,125 25 

$48,291 05 



TAXES. 



The amount of Taxes assessed on the Polls, and on the Real 
and Personal Estate in the City of Lowell, for the year 1875, was as 
follows : 

VALUATION OF KEAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY. 



Of Corporations, $16,262,755 00 
Residents,... 20,967,790 00 
Non-Residents, 1,459,950 00 



$38,690,495 00 



Tax $16.20 per $1,000, $263,456 60 

" " " " 339,677 81 

" " " 23,651 19 



$626,785 60 



Number of polls, 11,250, at $2.00 each, 22,500 00 



649,285 60 
Add Bank Tax assessed on Non-Residents, on shares 
of stock owned by them, which were not included 
in the valuation of the city, 21 ,583 53 



Total amount of taxes assessed in 1875, $670,869 13 



The City's proportion of the State Tax for 1875, was $38,580 00 

The City's proportion of the State Tax for 1874, was 38,580 00 

The City's proportion of the County Tax for 1874, 

was $26,400 11 

The City's proportion of the County Tax for 1875, 

was 24,750 16 



Decrease from 1874, ..„ $1,649 95 



The number of Polls in 1875, as returned 

by the Assessors, was 11,250 

The number of Polls in 1874, as returned 

by the Assessors, was * • 11,126 

Increase over 1874, 124 



148 auditor's report. 



Amount of Taxes assessed in 1875, $670,869 13 

Amount of Taxes collected of the assess- 
ment of 1875, $650,333 65 

Amount of Taxes abated on the assess- 
ment of 1875, by the Assessors, as 
per their Report, 1,037 01 



651,370 66 



Leaving the amount of Taxes (assessed in 1875) un- 
collected January 1, 1876, $19,498 47 



APPROPKIATED AND ASSESSED IN 1875. 

For the ordinary expenses of the City, $569,500 00 

For State Tax, 38,580 00 

For County Tax, 24,750 16 

For Overlays (an apportionment), 16,455 44 

For Bank Tax on non-residents, assessed, and which 
shares of stock were not included in the valuation 

of the city,... 21,583 53 



Total amount of Taxes on Property and Polls, $670,869 13 



Amount of Taxes assessed in 1872, uncollected Jan- 
uary 1, 1875, $89 62 

Amount of Taxes assessed in 1872, uncollected Jan- 
uary 1, 1876, 89 62 



Amount of Taxes assessed in 1873, uncollected Jan- 
uary 1, 1875, $13,355 78 



Amount of Taxes assessed in 1873, col- 
lected in 1875, $7,172 10 

Amount of Taxes assessed in 1873, abated 
by the Assessors in 1875, as per their 
Report, 6,008 93 



13,181 03 

Amount of Taxes assessed in 1873, uncollected Jan- 
uary 1, 1876,.... 174 75 

$13,355 78 



TAXES. 149 

Amount of Taxes assessed in 1874, uncollected Jan- 
uary 1, 1875, $21,883 14 

Amount of Taxes assessed in 1874, col- 
lected in 1875, $16,117 10 

Amount of Taxes assessed in 1874, abated 
by the Assessors in 1875, as per their 

Keport, 275 50 

16,392 60 

Amount of Taxes assessed in 1874, uncollected Jan- 
uary 1, 187-6, » 5,490 54 

$21,883 14 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 



Amount of overlays assessed in 1875,. ... $16,455 44 

$16,455 44 



EXPENDITURE. 

Amount abated by Assessors, on Taxes of 

1875, 1,037 01 

Balance unexpended January 1, 1876,.... 15,418 43 

16,455 44 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 



Borrowed of the Appletou National Bank, $61,000 00 

$61,000 00 



PAYMENT. 

Paid to Appleton National Bank, $61,000 00 



$61,000 00 



CARNEY MEDAL FUND. 



^Received of James G. Carney, Esq., in 1858 
and 1859, the amount of two hundred 
dollars, which is to remain a perpetual 
debt of the city forever ; the interest 
to be applied in payment for the 
" Carney Medals," to the departments 
of the High School (annually), $20 



$200 00 



Undrawn January 1, 1876, ., $200 00 



* One Hundred dollars was donated August 24, 1858, and accepted by the City Council 
September 14, 1858, and One Hundred dollars additional, July 15, 1859, and accepted July 
26, 1859. For the information of the citizens of Lowell, the Auditor respectfully refers them 
to the "Annual Report of the School Committee," for the year 1859, where all the corres- 
pondence between the donor and the recipient may be found. 



SINKING FUND 
FOR REDUCTION OF THE WATER DEBT. 



Appropriated and assessed in 1875, $25,000 00 

$25,000 00 



Invested at interest, $25,000 00 

$25,000 00 



20 



TABLE OF APPEOPKIATIONS FOE 1875, 

INCLUDING THE BALANCES UNDRAWN AT THE COMMENCEMENT OF THE 

YEAR, AND THE RECEIPTS FROM ALL SOURCES DURING THE 

YEAR; ALSO, THE EXPENDITURES FOR 1875, AND THE 

BALANCES UNDRAWN JANUARY i, 1876. 



Schools, 

School Houses, 

Roads and Bridges, ........ 

Reserved Fund, 

*State Aid for Disabled Sol 
diers and Sailors and their 
Families, and for the Fam- 
ilies of the Slain, 

Paupers, 

Police, 

Fire Department, 

Sewers and Drains, 

Commons, 

Printing and Advertising,.. . 

Lighting Streets and Public 
Buildings, 

Repairs of Public Buildings, 

City Library, 

Salaries, 

Setting Trees, 

City Debt, 

Interest on City Debt, 

Carney Medal Fund, 

Corporation Tax, 

Water Works, 

Health Account, 

National Bank Tax, 

Sinking Fund for Water Debt 

Abatement of Taxes, 



APPROPRIA- 
TIONS. 



EXPENDITURES. 



48,045 


it 
23 


165,281 


53 


211,181 


26 


33,731 


88 


72,494 


48 


52,262 


64 


84,817 


88 


5,745 


19 


5,051 


69 


25,412 


79 


40,598 


54 


6,476 


95 


23,743 


53 


81 


87 


20,500 


00 


48,291 


05 


200 


00 


31,426 


42 


299,532 


28 


3,594 


54 


31,245 


38 


25,000 


00 


16,455 


44 



$126,739 85 

47,312 76 

142,379 60 

187,399 66 



27,871 67 
57,560 17 
46,797 09 
72,514 64 
5,135 32 
3,712 54 

22,061 63 

38,886 27 
4,564 78 
20,775 00 
81 87 
20,500 00 
35,165 80 



275,660 78 

1,425 08 

21,525 43 

25,000 00 

1,037 01 



$14,155 29 

732 47 

22,901 93 

23,781 60 



5,860 21 
14,934 31 

5,465 55 

12,303 24 

609 87 

1,339 15 

3,351 16 
1,712 27 
1,912 17 
2,968 53 



13,125 25 

200 00 

31,426 42 

23,871 50 

2,169 46 

9,719 95 

15,418 43 



* Unsettled account with the Commonwealth. 



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DEBTS DUE THE CITY, 

JANUARY 1, 1876. 



For Taxes of 1872, $ 89 62 

Taxes of 1873, 174 75 

Taxes of 1874, 5,490 54 

Taxes of 1875, 19,498 47 

Sidewalk Assessments, 7,241 77 

Sewer Assessments, 6,771 18 

Water Rates and Service Pipe, 3,968 17 

Execution against Horace Howard,.. 48 21 

Sundry persons, book account, 2,270 72 



*From Commonwealth, State aid, 24,276 01 

Commonwealth, rent of armories, 2,050 00 



$25,253 38 



20,300 05 

26,326 01 
$71,879 44 



* Unsettled account with Commonwealth. 



EEAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 



City Government Building, $25,000 00 

Huntington and Jackson "Halls, < 41 ,200 00 

Market House, 56,000 00 

City Scales, rear of Market House, 1,000 00 

High School-house, on Anne and Kirk streets, 43,000 00 

Bartlett School-house, on Clark street, 13,000 00 

Edson School-house, on Highland street, 13,000 00 

Colburn School-house, on Lawrence street, 21,000 00 

Franklin School-house, on Middlesex and Branch 

streets, , 12,500 00 

Moody School-house, on East Merrimack street, 12,000 00 

Green School-house, on Merrimack street, 105,800 00 

Mann School-house, on Lewis street, 12,500 00 

Varnum School-house, on Myrtle street, 17,000 00 

Sherman School-house, on Powell street, 7,000 00 

Primary School-house and Ward Room, on Merrimack 

and Race streets 3,400 00 

Primary School-house and Ward Room, on Church 

street, 4,600 00 

Primary School-house, on Middlesex and Elliot streets, 6,000 00 

Primary School-house, on School street, 1,000 00 

Primary School-house, on High street, 3,600 00 

Primary School-house, on Paige street, 2,300 00 

Primary School-house, on Grand street, 1,000 00 

Primary School-houses, on Carter street .'. . . 7,500 00 

Primary School-house, on Charles street, ... . 2,000 00 

Primary School-house, on Fayette street, 5,500 00 

Primary School-house, on Cabot street, 2,600 00 

Primary School-house, on Rock street, 2,100 00 

Primary School-house, on West-Sixth street, 7,000 00 

Primary School-house, on Fourth street, 2,500 00 

Primary School-house, on Ames and Lawrence streets, 7,700 00 

Primary School-house, on Chapel street, 5,400 00 

Primary School-houses, on Central and Chapel streets, 9,000 00 

Primary School-house, on Howard street, 4,000 00 

Primary School-house, on Worthen street, 26,000 00 

Amount carried forward, $483,200 00 

21 



162 auditor's report. 



Amount brought forward, $483,200 00 

Primary School-house, on Common street,. ... , 34,000 00 

Primary School-house, on High street, 15,000 00 

Primary School-house, on Varnum avenue, 500 00 

Primary School-house, on Mammoth Road, 3,000 00 

Primary School-house, at Middlesex Village, 3,000 00 

Hose Carriage House and Ward Room, on Fayette 

street, . , 3,100 00 

Hook and Ladder House, Ward Room, Carpenter's 

Shop and Armory, on Middle street, 21,000 00 

Double Engine House and Stable, on Middle street,.. 10,250 00 

Engine House and Stable, on Middlesex street,. ..-,.. 6,550 00 

Engine House and Stable, on Gorham street,. ....... 13,200 00 

Engine House,, at Ayer*s City,. .... 500 00 

Hose Carriage House, on Willie and Fletcher streets, 2,500 00 

Hose Carriage House, on Central street, 1,700 00 

Hose Carriage and Engine House, on Warren- street, 1,800 00 

Gun House and Ward Room, on South street, 1,200 00 

Almshouse and Farm, 25.000 00 

House for Chaplain, at City Farm, 2,500 00 

Pest House, at City Farm, .' 2,500 00 

Land and Buildings, on Kirk and Lee streets, 16,000 00 

Land and Buildings, on Western avenue, 10,000 00 

Land and Buildings, on Adams, Lagrange, Fletcher 

and Cross streets, 27,000 00 

Public Landing, rear Market House, exclusive of the 

Lauding set off by the Locks and Canals, 1,250 00 

Lot of Laud , on Chelmsford street, - 600 00 

Lot of Land, on First street, ] 90 00 

Lot of Land, on Fletcher and Whiting streets, 2,133 99 

Lot of Land and Stone Ledge, on Fletcher street,. . . . 1,956 68 

Lot of Land and Stone Ledge, on Whiting street,. . . . 2,200 00 

Lot of Land, on Middle street, 10,600 00 

South Common, 23,300 00 

North Common, 18,300 00 

Belvidere Park, 2,300 00 

Mount Vernon Park, 1,000 00 



$747,330 67 



WATER WORKS. 

The Real Estate and Personal Property belonging to 
the City, occupied and used by the Water Works, 
the net cost of which is, to January 1, 1876,. ...$1,876,128 50 



PERSONAL PROPERTY OWNED BY THE CITY. 



SCHEDULE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY IN THE CARE 
OE JOHN C. WOODWARD, SUPERINTENDENT OE 
STREETS, JANUARY 1, 1876: 

Stone Crusher and Engine, SI, 200 00 

Blacksmith Tools and Stock, 600 00 

380 cords Hard Wood, 2,660 00 

399 cords Pine Wood, 1.191 00 

175 tons Coal, 1,575 00 

12 tons Hay, 264 00 

5 tons Straw, 100 00 

6 tons Carrots, 78 00 

130 bushels Oats, 71 50 

11 bags Meal, 17 16 

4 Rakes, 2 00 

8 Street Rakes, 6 00 

9 Forks, 9 00 

30 Horses, 7,500 00 

11 sets Double Harnesses, 550 00 

9 sets Single Harnesses, 360 00 

5 sets Lead Harnesses, 50 00 

20 Feed Baskets, 10 00 

36 Curry Combs and Brushes, 81 00 

36 Collars, 108 00 

32 Halters, 32 00 

35 Blankets, 70 00 

30 Surcingles, 35 00 

1 Horse Sling, 15 00 

4 Horse Covers, 20 00 

2 Buffalo Robes, 16 00 

1 Hay Cutter, 7 00 

I Boiler, 3 00 

II Double Carts, . 1,100 00 

6 Single Carts, 480 00 

1 Watering Cart, 120 00 

1 pair Draught Wheels, ., 110 00 

5 Wood Wagons, 450 00 

Amount carried forward, $18,890 66 



164 auditor's report. 



Amount brought forward, SI 8,890 66 

1 Pauper Wagon, 75 00 

1 Lumber Wagon, 80 00 

2 Single Wagons, . 180 00 

12 Double Wood Sleds, 600 00 

2 Scavenger Dump Sleds, 160 00 

1 Single Sleigh, 40 00 

1 Pauper Sleigh, 100 00 

2 Stone Truck Drags, 1 00 00 

24 Wheelbarrows, 48 00 

10,000 feet Old Sewer Plank, 100 00 

4,000 feet Oak Plank, 160 00 

1,000 feet Pine Plank, 24 00 

30,000 feet Spruce Plank, 660 00 

1 59 Shovels, 119 25 

20 Snow Shovels, . . 20 00 

27 Hoes, . 27 00 

4 Corn Brooms, 2 00 

14 Street Brooms, 4 50 

36 Lanterns, 36 00 

11 Oil Cans, 6 00 

5 Pails, 2 50 

66 Picks, 80 00 

567 lbs. Drills, 94 50 

2 Churn Drills, 6 00 

38 Crowbars, 114 00 

1 4 Striking Hammers, 28 00 

10 Face Hammers, 20 00 

7 Paving Hammers, 9 00 

12 Axes, 9 00 

1 Adze, 1 50 

32 Plug Drills, 7 80 

2 WellJacks, ... 90 00 

2 Jack Screws, 10 00 

4 Hand Hammers, «.-... 4 00 

2 Ploughs, 18 00 

2 Street Scrapers, 12 00 

2 Scythes, 4 00 

60 Stake Chains, 30 00 

9 Draught Chains, 45 00 

1 Stone Drag, 10 00 

1 Platform Scale, 10 00 

1 Stone Roller, 75 00 

1 Grindstone, 6 00 

1 Boring Machine, 8 00 

2 Sand Screens, 20 00 

Amount carried forward, $22,1 46 71 



PERSONAL PROPERTY OWNED BY THE CITY. 165 

Amount brought forward, . $22,146 71 

1 Coal Screen, 15 00 

119 feet Flagging, 101 15 

1200 feet Edgestone 504 00 

4 Stone Bounds, 6 00 

1 Copper Pump, . 8 00 

3 Sewer Pumps, 50 00 

4 Manhole Castings, 40 00 

27 Catch Basin Castings, 378 00 

1 Concord Grate, 9 00 

4 Stoves, 25 00 

40 Sign Boards, 20 00 

2 Saws and Saw Frame, ,50 00 

3HandSaws,.. 3 00 

3 Wood Saws, 3 50 

2 Saw Horses, 1 50 

9 Tool Chests, 45 00 

Bed and Bedding, 65 00 

3 Shear Poles and Rigging, 75 00 

3 Dump Tubs, 30 00 

3 Spirit Levels, 4 50 

18 Steel Wedges, 11 50 

6 Coal Baskets, 7 50 

3 Coal Shovels 4 50 

34 Stone-Cutters' Points, 14 17 

3 Masons' Trowels, 2 25 

9 Paving Mauls, 45 00 

1 Cross-Cut Saw, 5 90 

3 Ladders, 15 20 

1 Hand Cart, 20 00 

1 pair Draught Wheels, 125 00 

4 pairs Rubber Boots, 18 00 

50 feet Rubber Hose,. .. , 16 00 

3 Tubs, 3 75 

5 Snow Scrapers, 25 00 

1 Snow Plough, 25 00 



,919 13 



SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY IN THE CARE OP LOR- 
ENZO PHELPS, SUPERINTENDENT OF THE ALMS- 
HOUSE AND FARM, JANUARY 1, 1876 : 

6 Horses, $1,075 00 

6 Cows, 360 00 

15 Pigs, 210 00 

Amount carried forward, $1 ,645 00 



166 



AUDITORS REPORT. 



Amount brought forward, . $1,645 00 

40 Fowls, 24 80 

36 tons English Hay, 900 00 

8£ tons English Hay, 127 50 

13 tons Meadow Hay, 182 00 

63 tons Coal, 475 65 

30 cords Wood, 240 00 

800 bushels Potatoes, 480 00 

75 bushels Turnips, 24 75 

35 bushels French Turnips, 17 50 

25 bushels Beets, 18 75 

260 bushels Sugar Beets, 65 00 

1200 lbs. Carrots, ..- 12 00 

16 bushels Onions, 10 00 

225 gallons Cider, ».. 45 00 

275 gallons Vinegar, 68 75 

1 5 bushels Parsnips, 11 25 

10£ bushels Beans, 25 00 

750 lbs. Pop Corn, 18 75 

Lot Grass Seed, 5 00 

Lot Bran, Meal, etc., 20 00 

Lot Cabbages, 20 00 

8 barrels Flour, 64 00 

3 barrels Apples, 7 50 

2400 lbs. Codfish, 132 00 

350 lbs. Beef, 28 00 

3,050 lbs. Pork, Lard and Hams, 396 50 

190 gallons Molasses, 85 50 

7 Hogsheads, 7 00 

8 Pork Barrels, 6 00 

Lot Flour Barrels, Baskets, etc., 7 00 

1 bushel Cranberries, 3 00 

25 gallons Oil, 3 50 

Tools, Stock, Machinery, etc., in Shoe Shop, 25 00 

Tools, Stock, Machinery, etc., in Blacksmith Shop,. .. 25 00 

Tools and Lumber in Carpenter Shop, 47 00 

Lot of Groceries, etc., 163 00 

Clothing, Bedding, Furniture, etc., 5,511 15 

2 Farmers' Boilers, 50 00 

1 Soap Box, 10 00 

Clothing, Bedding, Furniture, etc., in Pest House,. . . 401 10 

1 Hand Engine and Hose, 150 00 

2 Two-Horse Wagons, 215 00 

3 Express Wagons, 375 00 

1 Hay Wagon, 115 00 

3 Carts, 300 00 

Amount carried fonvard, $12,563 95 



PERSONAL PROPERTY OWNED BY THE CITY. 167 

Amount ' brought forward, 

1 Night Cart, 

1 Hay Rack, 

1 Hand Cart, 

2 Traverse Runner Sleighs, 

1 Sled, 

1 Carryall, 

2 Sleighs, « 

2 Double Harnesses, 

5 Harnesses, 

2 Lap Robes, 

6 Wheelbarrows, 

4 Ox Yokes, 

1 Swill Box, 

1 Horse Rake, 

Cradles, Scythes, etc., 

Market Boxes, 

Strawberry Boxes, 

Coffins, 

12 Pitchforks, 

Ladders, , 

Hot Bed and Window Sashes, Glass, etc., 

7 Ploughs, '. 

12 Shovels, 

4 Manure Forks, 

32 Hoes, 

3 Harrows, 

1 Seed Sower, 

5 Picks, 5 00 

6 Iron Bars, 6 00 

1 Fan Mill, 5 00 

Rakes, 10 00 

1 Mowing Machine, 37 00 

1 Hay Tedder, 55 00 

Grindstones, etc., 25 00 

Hay Cutter and other tools, 25 00 

1 Corn Sheller, 5 00 

$14,015 55 



12,563 


95 


100 


00 


25 


00 


10 


00 


J50 


00 


15 


00 


200 


00 


70 


00 


70 


00 


90 


00 


4 


00 


25 


00 


16 


00 


7 


00 


15 


00 


8 


50 


20 


80 


13 


00 


120 


00 


12 


00 


25 


80 


162 


50 


70 


00 


10 


00 


2 


50 


7 


50 


24 


00 


5 


00 



168 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



SCHEDULE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY IN THE CARE 
OF LORENZO G. HOWE, SUPERINTENDENT OF 
PUBLIC BUILDINGS, AT THE CITY'S SHOP, JAN- 
UARY 1, 1876: 

4,200 feet Canada Boards, 

200 feet Birch Boards, 

800 feet Georgia Pine Boards, 

300 feet Georgia Pine Sheathing, 

200 feet Chalk Trough, 

200 feet Sheathing, 

200 feet Moulding, . , 

250 feet Cherry Boards, 

2,000 feet Lumber (old), 

900 feet Old Finish Boards and Plank, 

400 Fence Picks, 

1 M Shingles, 

7 casks Nails, 

6 boxes Glass, 

10 old Windows, ., 

1 old Doors, , .. 

250 Primary School Desks, 

8 Teachers' Desks, 

175 School Chairs,. . . , 

100 sets Desk Irons, 

100 Pedestals for Chairs, 

5 Stoves, 

1 Wardrobe, . 

6 Tables, 

12 Settees, , 

39 New Desks, 

15 Pails, 

14 Brooms, 

54 boxes White Crayons, 

13 boxes Assorted Crayons, , 

4 Chairs, 

4 Coal Hods, . r 

8 Dust Pans, 

16 Stove Shovels, 

4 Stove Brushes, «, 

6 Floor Brushes, 

39 Floor Mats, 

1 2 Feather Dusters, 

3 Mop Handles, 

6 Gas Fixtures, . , 

12 dozen Ink Wells, 

200 lbs. White Lead, 

Amount carried forward, 



$168 00 


6 


00 


32 


00 


7 


00 


6 


00 


8 


00 


6 


00 


10 


00 


20 


00 


18 


00 


12 


00 


3 


00 


30 


00 


21 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


312 


25 


32 


00 


131 


25 


100 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


8 


00 


6 


00 


8 


00 


58 


50 


3 


75 


3 


75 


5 


94 


13 


00 



10 00 
5 00 
3 50 



4 


00 


1 


20 


5 


40 


81 


00 


20 


85 




75 


12 


00 


8 


64 


22 


CO 



,323 78 



PERSONAL PROPERTY OWNED BY THE CITY. 169 



Amount brought forward, $1 ,323 78 

5 yards Enameled Cloth, 

150 Chairs, at Ward Room No. 3 (Evening Schools), 
12 Tables, at Ward Room No. 3 (Evening Schools), 

30 Chairs, at Primitive Methodist Vestry (Evening 

Schools) , 

2 Stoves, at Primitive Methodist Vestry (Evening 
Schools, 

20 Settees and 2 Tables, at Primitive Methodist Ves- 

try (Evening Schools) , 

370 Chairs, at Green School (Evening Schools),. .... 
90 Tables, at Green School (Evening Schools),.. ... . 

40 Stools, at Green School (Evening Schools), 

4 Tables, at Howard Chapel (Evening Schools), 

12 Tables, at Ward Room No. 3 (Evening Schools),. . 
100 Hard Wood Stools, at Green School (Drawing 

School) , 

300 feet Rubber Hose, 

25 old Chairs, < 

31 Settees, 

2 yards Carpet, 

12 pairs Butts, « 

4 lbs. Trunk Nails, 

4 lbs. Brads, 

3 Door Knobs, 

21 Locks, r 

1 dozen Sash Fastenings, 

70 Erasers, 

18 large Coffins, 

25 small Coffins, 



SCHEDULE OF TOOLS IN CHAEGE OF SUPERINTEN- 
DENT OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS, JANUARY 1, 1876: 

2 Picks, 

10 Shovels, 

1 Iron Bar, » 

9 Wheelbarrows, 

1 Shingle Ripper, 

1 Jack Screw, 

1 Grindstone, 

1 Steelyard, 

2 Augers, 

3 Door Sets, 

Amount carried forward, $41 25 

22 



3 


75 


75 


00 


18 


00 


15 


00 


50 


00 


60 


00 


370 


00 


315 


00 


40 


00 


12 


00 


36 


00 


105 


00 


60 


00 


12 


50 


106 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 




60 




98 




39 


15 


00 




60 


14 


00 


54 


00 


50 


00 


$2,747 


60 


1 


75 


5 


00 


2 


50 


17 


00 


1 


50 


1 


50 


5 


00 


1 


50 


2 


50 


3 


00 



170 auditor's report. 



25 


00 


10 


00 


6 


00 


3 


00 


1 


50 


7 


00 


13 





10 


00 


6 


00 


11 


25 


2 


50 


7 


50 


40 


00 


$184 


00 





Amount brought forward, $41 25 

1 1 Ladders, - 

5 pairs Steps, 

6 Wood Saws, 

4 Hand Screws, 

3 Pump Hooks, » 

8 Axes, 

5 pairs Pipers' Tongs, 

4 Masons' Jacks, 

1 2 Paint Pots, 

15 Oil Cans, 

5 Stone Jugs, 

15 Paint Brushes, 

1 set Painter's Rigging, 



Furniture in City Government Building, Huntington 

Hall and Jackson Hall, $9,000 00 

Furniture in School Houses, not included in the Real 

Estate, 10,000 00 

Furniture in Ward Rooms, 50 00 

Furniture in Armories and Drill Room, 500 00 

Cast-Steel Bell on Market House Building, 900 00 

Bell on Varnum School-house, 1,000 00 

Bell in High-Street Church Tower, 500 00 

Flag Staffs, 1,000 00 

In care of the Chief Engineer of the Fire Department 

(personal property), 42,000 00 

In care of the Chief Engineer of the Fire Department 

(Fire Alarm Telegraph), 18,000 00 

$82,9 50 00 

SCHEDULE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY IN THE CARE 
OF GEORGE HOBSON, SUPERINTENDENT OF 
STREET LAMPS, JANUARY 1, 1876: 

623 Gas and 56 Fluid Lanterns, Posts, etc., $16,000 00 

1 Building, 100 00 

2 Horses, 250 00 

2 Wagons, 225 00 

1 Wagon Cover, 15 00 

1 Lamp Rack, 15 00 

3 Sleighs, , 150 00 

3 Harnesses, 75 00 

4 Horse Blankets, 15 00 

Amount carried forward, $16,845 00 



PERSONAL PROPERTY OWNED BY THE CITY. 171 

Amount brought forward, $16,845 00 

1 Horse Cover, 3 00 

1 Buffalo Robe, 12 00 

3 Cuny Combs and Brushes, 3 00 

1 Stove and Copper Boiler, . 15 00 

4 Miner Lanterns, 32 00 

2 Bartlett Lanterns, 17 00 

1 Square Lantern (old), 5 00 

12 Square Lanterns (unglazed), 72 00 

2 Globes,. , 2 50 

2 Square Fluid Lanterns, 8 00 

lOOilCans, 23 00 

112 Fluid Lamps, , 56 00 

6 Fluid Fixtures, 42 00 

100 Lamp-post Cocks, 25 00 

7 Fluid Lantern Frames, 10 00 

9 Gas Lantern Frames, 18 00 

13 Iron Arms, « 18 20 

3 \ gross Matches, 7 00 

40 gallons Alcohol, 100 00 

25 gallons Naphtha, 4 25 

20 gallons Kerosene, 2 80 

20 Ladders, 25 00 

Glass, Paint and Brushes, 7 00 

1 Iron Bar, 3 00 

1 pair Nippers, 1 00 

2 pairs Pliers, 4 00 

3 pairs Gas Tongs, • 5 00 

1 Air Pump, 25 00 

1 Coal Hod and Water Pot, 2 25 

Lamps, Tools, Brooms, etc., 10 00 

$17,403 00 

SCHEDULE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY UNDER THE 
CHARGE OF W. H. CLEMENCE, CITY MARSHAL, 
AT POLICE COURT ROOMS, JANUARY 1, 1876 : 

1 Fire-Proof Safe, 

1 Black Walnut Chair, 

4 Black Walnut Tables, 

1 Mahogany Table, 

39 Settees, 

2 Waste Baskets, 

3 Spittoons, 

12 Pen Holders, 

3 Ink Stands, 

Amount carried forward, $725 70 



$500 00 


20 


00 


80 


00 


10 


00 


109 


60 


1 


00 


2 


25 




60 


2 


25 



172 auditor's report. 



145 


25 


2 


40 


4 


50 


11 


19 


12 


36 


5 


00 


56 


00 


1 


12 


3 


00 


28 


00 




25 


35 


00 


$1,029 


77 





Amount brought forward, $725 70 

1 68 yards Carpet, 

6 yards Oil Cloth, » , 

8 yards Crumb Cloth, . 

6 Door Mats, 

Paper under Carpets, 

1 cord Pine Wood, 

7 tons Coal, 

1 Hammer, 

1 Wheelbarrow, , 

10 Ash Hods, , 

1 Shovel, 

2 Clocks, 



SCHEDULE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY UNDER THE 
CHARGE OF W. H. CLEMENCE, CITY MARSHAL, 
AT POLICE STATION, JANUARY 1, 1876 : 

1 Iron Safe, ... 

6 Desks, 

55 Chairs, 

3 Waste Baskets, 

1 2 Spittoons, 

24 Pen Holders and Pens, 

2 Ink Stands, 

2 Clocks, 

9 Door Mats, 

6 Thermometers, 

1 Feather Duster, 

1 Floor Brush, 

1 Hand Brush, 

Dust Pan, Pail and Broom, 

Pen Pack and Pens, 

5 Frames for Notices, . 

1 cord Pine Wood, 

7 tons Coal, 

1 Hammer, *. 

2 Dies for Police Buttons, 

2 gross Police Buttous, 

75 Police Whistles, 

65 Police Badges, . . 

54 Police Clubs and Belts, < . 

50 Police Clubs, ...... 

15 Record Books, 

46 Office Chairs,, 

Amount carried forward, $1,123 73 



225 


00 


145 


00 


51 


25 


1 


50 


6 


75 


1 


35 


1 


50 


16 


00 


15 


41 


3 


00 


2 


50 




75 




37 




50 




22 


2 


50 


5 


00 


56 


00 


1 


13 


60 


00 


18 


00 


75 


00 


280 


00 


54 


00 


25 


00 


30 


00 


46 


00 



PERSONAL PROPERTY OWNED BY THE CITY. 173 

Amount brought forward, $1 ,123 73 

9 Office Desks, 72 00 

2 Waste Baskets, . 2 00 

3 Tables, , 

1 Settee and Lounge, 

4 Mirrors, ....,.., , 

4 Bedsteads, 

14 Mattrasses, 

39 Blankets, 

24 Buckets, • 

2 Pails, 

9 Dippers, 

1 Tub, 

1 Coal Hod, 

3 Brooms, 

2 Hand Brushes, 

2 Dust Pans, , 

1 Coffee Pot, , 

1 Ice Tank, 

3 Comforters, , 

3 Pillow Cases, , 

1 Slate, 

1 Wash Basin, 

7 Pen Racks, 

9 Ink Stands, , 

1 Chain, . • , , 

7 Lanterns, 

50 feet Rubber Hose, , 

\ barrel Soap, , 

1 quart Ink, , 

3 Match Safes, , 

1 copy Lowell Directory, , 

1 copy General Statutes, , 

1 copy Revised Statutes, 

1 copy City Ordinances, , 

Stationery, ......<.................,...,...... 

Postage Stamps, 



25 


00 


18 


00 


8 


00 


16 


00 


28 


00 


39 


00 


24 


00 


1 


00 




90 


1 


50 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 




50 




75 


9 


00 


3 


00 


1 


50 




50 


3 


00 


3 


75 


5 


00 




75 


3 


75 


8 


00 


2 


50 


1 


00 




30 


1 


50 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


12 


00 




50 


$1,430 43 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



The following schedule, furnished by the Chief Engineer, shows 
the number of Engines and Firemen, and condition of the Appa- 
ratus belonging to the Fire Department : 

HOPE STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 1. 

13 Members. — House on Gorham Street. 

Apparatus and Property owned by the City, in care of this Company. 

This Company was reorganized and put in service November 
15, 1875. The steamer was built by the Union Machine Company, 
of Fitchburg, in October, 1870. The engine has two double-acting 
steam cylinders, 7J inches in diameter, and 8-inch stroke, and two 
double-acting pumps, 4f inches in diameter, and 8-inch stroke ; 
weight, when loaded, 7,575 lbs. ; hose carriage built by Hunneman 
& Co. in 1874, carrying 800 feet of hose ; 1 hose sleigh ; 1,750 feet 
2^-inch leading hose, in good condition ; 32 feet suction hose ; 6 
reducing couplings ; 2 axes ; 2 horses ; 1 pair harnesses ; 4 blank- 
ets ; 1 pair hoods ; 1 pair lead bars ; 2 whiffletrees ; 3 beds and 
bedding ; 2 bureaus ; 14 cane seat chairs ; 6 common chairs ; 1 
table ; 1 clock ; 1 mirror ; 1 two-way chuck ; 1 spreading nozzle ; 
1 stop nozzle and pipe, and all necessary tools for cleaning horses 
and repairing engine ; 13 silver badges. 

TORRENT STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 2. 

13 Members. — House on Middlesex Street. 

Apparatus and Property owned by the City, in care of this Company. 

This Company was organized and put into service May 1, 1861. 
The steamer was built by Hunneman & Co., Boston, and given in 
charge of this Company February 28, 1868. The engine has two 
double-acting steam cylinders, 8 inches in diameter, and 8-inch 
stroke ; and two double-acting pumps, 4f inches in diameter, and 
8-inch stroke. The pumps are so arranged that they can be worked 
separately in case of accident to either of them ; the boiler will 
make steam enough to run the engine in five minutes ; weight, when 
loaded, 7,720 lbs. ; 30 feet suction hose, with hydrant couplings ; hose 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 175 



carriage built in 1868, by Hunneraan & Co., drawn by hand, carry- 
ing 500 feet of hose ; 1,700 feet 2^-inch leading hose, in good con- 
dition ; 2 axes ; 1 reducing coupling ; 1 spreading nozzle ; 1 stop 
nozzle, with pipe ; 14 cane-seat chairs ; 3 common chairs ; 1 table ; 
2 stoves ; 1 bureau ; 3 beds and bedding ; 2 mirrors ; 1 clock ; 1 
pair horses ; 1 pair harnesses ; 4 blankets ; 1 pair lead bars ; and 
all necessary tools for cleaning horses and repairs of engine ; 1 two- 
way chuck ; 1 copper boiler ; 1 jack-screw ; 1 fuel wagon ; 1 hose 
sleigh ; 13 hat fronts ; 1 carriage jack ; 75 feet small rubber hose ; 
1 rotary pump ; 13 silver badges. 

WAMESIT STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 3. 

13 Members. — House on Middle Street. 

Apparatus and Property owned by the City, in care of this Company. 

This Company was organized and put into service in October, 
1859. In November, 1866, they were given in charge of a new 
steamer built by Hunneraan & Co., of the same st}'le, capacity, etc., 
as Steam Fire Engine No. 2 ; weight, when loaded, 7,650 lbs. ; 30 
feet suction hose, with hydrant couplings ; hose carriage built by 
Amoskeag Company in 1874, carrying 800 feet hose ; 1 horse hose 
sleigh ; 2 reducing couplings ; 2 axes ; 1 spreading nozzle ; 1 stop 
nozzle, with pipe; 1,650 feet 2£-inch leather hose, in good condi- 
tion ; 6 wooden chairs ; 18 cane-seat chairs ; 1 two-way chuck ; 1 
table ; two mirrors ; 2 desks ; 1 bureau ; 3 beds and bedding ; 2 
jack screws ; 1 pair horses ; 2 pairs harnesses ; 4 blankets ; 1 pair 
lead bars ; 2 whiffletrees ; 1 large stove ; 1 clock ; 50 feet f-inch 
rubber hose and pipe ; 1 copper boiler ; 1 fuel wagon ; 1 traverse- 
runner sleigh ; 1 small wagon ; and all necessary tools for cleaning 
horses and repairs of engine ; 13 hat fronts ; 13 silver badges. 

RELIEF STEAM FIRE ENGINE. 

House on Warren Street. 

Apparatus and Property owned by the City, in care of Steward of 
Ocean Hose Company. 

Engine built by Silsby, Mynderse & Co., Seneca Falls, in 1861, 
on the rotary principle, 12-inch engine, 6-inch pump. In 1866, a 
new boiler was built by Hunneman & Co., Boston, which will make 
steam enough to run the engine in five minutes ; weight, when 
loaded, 8,300 lbs. ; 30 feet suction hose, with hydrant couplings ; 
hose carriage built in 1861, by Joel Jenkins, drawn by horse, carry- 
ing 800 feet of hose, and all necessary tools for repairs of engine ; 
500 feet 2^-inch hose ; 100 feet rubber hose. 



176 auditor's report. 



OCEAN HOSE COMPANY, No. 1. 

12 Members. — House on Warren Street. 

Apparatus and Property owned by the City, in care of this Company. 

Hose Carriage built by Hunneman & Co., Boston, drawn by 
hand, carrying 750 feet of hose; 1 hose sleigh; 2,000 feet 2^-inch 
leading hose, in good condition ; 1 spreading nozzle ; 2 ■ axes ; 2 
stoves ; 1 two-way chuck ; 4 reducing couplings ; 1 table ; 1 copper 
boiler ; 1 harness ; 20 chairs ; 2 mirrors ; 1 jack ; 1 coal hod ; 12 
hat fronts ; 30 feet of small rubber hose ; 1 settee ; 2 lanterns ; 1 
carriage jack ; 2 shovels ; 12 silver badges. 

MECHANICS HOSE COMPANY, No. 2. 

12 Members. — House on Cross Street. 

Apparatus and Property owned by the City, in care of this Company. 

Hose Carriage built by Jukett & Freeman, of Boston, in 1869, 
carrying 900 feet of hose ; 1 hose sleigh ; 1,600 feet of 2^-inch lead- 
ing hose, in good condition ; 1 reducer ; 1 spreading nozzle ; 1 jack ; 
50 feet rubber hose and pipe ; 2 settees ; 6 common chairs ; 12 cane- 
seat chairs ; 1 mirror ; 1 table ; 2 ladders ; 1 axe ; 1 two-way 
chuck; 2 stoves ; 12 hat fronts; 12 silver badges. 

EXCELSIOR HOSE COMPANY, No. 3. 

12 Members. — House on Central Street. 

Apparatus and Property owned by the City, in care of this Company. 

Hose Carriage built by Jukett & Freeman, Boston, in 1869, 
drawn by hand, carrying 900 feet of hose ; 1 hose sleigh ; 1,600 feet 
2J-inch hose ; 30 feet f-inch hose ; 2 axes ; 4 buckets ; 8 common 
chairs; 13 cane-seat chairs ; 1 clock; 1 mirror; 1 stove; 1 table; 
2 settees ; 2 coal hods ; 1 jack ; 25 feet rubber hose ; 1 ladder ; 4 
reducers ; 6 hat fronts ; 1 two-way chuck ; 1 two-horse carriage 
pole ; 1 copper boiler ; 1 coal sifter ; 2 shovels ; 1 carriage jack ; 3 
lanterns; 1 wrench; 1 reducer; 1 pair steps ; 12 silver badges. 

MAZEPPA HOSE COMPANY, No. 4. 

12 Members. — House on Fayette Street. 

Apparatus and Property owned by the City, in care of this Company. 

Hose carriage built by Wright & Co., Lowell, in 1871, carrying 
900 feet of hose, drawn by hand ; 1 hose sleigh ; 1,650 feet 2^-inch 



FIKE DEPARTMENT. 177 



hose, in good condition ; 1 spreading nozzle ; 2 axes ; 1 two-way 
chuck ; 2 reducing couplings ; 2 stoves ; 1 coal hod ; 1 mirror ; 1 
table ; 23 chairs ; 1 settee ; 30 feet of rubber hose and pipe ; 12 hat 
fronts ; 5 lanterns ; 1 clock ; 1 iron bar ; 1 shovel ; 1 2 silver badges ; 

1 large clock. 

WELLMAN HOSE COMPANY, No. 5. 

12 Members. — House on Fourth Street. 

Apparatus and Property owned by the City, in care of this Company. 

Hose Carriage formerly used by Steamer Company No. 1, 
carrying 500 feet of hose ; 1 hose sleigh ; 1,500 feet of 2^-i.nch 
leather hose ; 1 34-foot ladder ; 1 two-way chuck ; 1 wrench : 2 re- 
ducing couplings ; 1 branch coupling ; 1 bar ; 8 spanners ; 2 lan- 
terns ; 1 stove (Aldrich) ; 1 settee ; 2 brooms ; 1 small shovel ; I 
coal hod ; 1 cluster ; 18 chairs ; 1 table ; 2 pails ; 12 silver badges. 

FRANKLIN HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, No. 1. 

28 Members. — House on Middle Street. 

Apparatus and Property owned by the City, in care of this Company. 

Two Hook and Ladder Carriages, built by Jukett & Freeman, 
of Boston, in 1869, carrying the following apparatus: 8 hooks; 12 
props ; 10 rakes ; 8 pitchforks ; 4 sledges ; 4 axes ; 6 stakes ; 4 guy 
ropes, of 84 feet each ; 200 feet street rope ; 16 ladders, of the fol- 
lowing lengths : 2 roof ladders, 18 feet each ; 1 do. do., of 20 feet ; , 

2 do. do., of 25 feet each ; 1 do. do., of 28 feet ; 1 ladder, of 12 feet ; 

1 do., of 24 feet ; 4 do., of 33 feet ; 2 butt ladders, of 28 feet each ; 

2 tip ladders, of 30 feet each. By joining the tips and butts 
together, they are enabled to raise ladders of 58 feet in length ; 25 
feet of rubber hose and pipe ; 6 ladders ; 4 shovels ; 100 feet of 
rope ; 10 chairs ; 1 stove ; 1 mirror ; 1 copper boiler ; 1 horse and 
harness ; 2 blankets ; 29 silver badges ; 2 small fire extinguishers 
(Steiner's). 

FIRE APPARATUS AT STATIONARY POINTS. 

Rocket Engine, No. 2. — House, Ayer City. Hunneman & 
Co. engine, owned by city ; diameter of cylinders, 5J inches ; 16 
inch stroke of piston ; 200 feet of leading hose ; 20 feet suction 
hose ; 1 two-wheeled jumper ; 1 copper goose neck, with reducer 5 
to 1\ inches. 

Fire Alarm Telegraph. — Four circuits, 7 bell strikers, 35 
signal boxes, 3 large gongs, 7 small gongs, and all necessary appa- 
ratus for the working of the same. 

23 



178 auditor's report. 



RECAPITULATION. 

5 engineers ; 128 firemen ; 1 hand engine ; 4 steam fire engines ; 

1 horse hose carriage ; 10 hose carriages ; 8 hose reels, on runners ; 

2 hook and ladder carriages ; 15,000 feet 2^-inch leading hose ; 600 
feet 2j-inch leading hose ; 132 feet suction hose ; 8 horses ; 2 fuel 
wagons ; 1 small wagon ; 2 trucks ; 1 large traverse-runner sleigh ; 
60 hat fronts ; 4 double harnesses ; 2 single harnesses ; 8 hooks ; 
26 ladders ; 12 props ; 10 rakes ; 8 pitchforks ; 4 sledges ; 19 
axes ; 200 feet strong rope ; 28 reducing couplings ; 7 spreading 
nozzles; 8 stop nozzles, with pipe; 9 beds and bedding; 160 
chairs ; 11 settees ; 10 mirrors ; 14 stoves ;; 8 tables ; 5 bureaus ; 3 
clocks ; 6 blankets ; 7 two-way chucks ; 1 four-wa}^ chuck ; 5 cop- 
per boilers ; 4 jack screws ; 2 desks ; 135 silver badges ; 1 set dies 
for department badge. 

The above apparatus is owned by the city, and is in good 
working order. The several companies are furnished with spanners, 
lanterns, signal lanterns, belts, axes, crowbars, shovels, and all 
necessary apparatus for the performance of their respective duties. 
There are seven fire buckets at the Middle street engine house. 

The City of Lowell has 16 Reservoirs, where water can be pro- 
cured in case of fire, situated as follows : 1 on Tyler street, at the 
corner of George street ; 1 on Chestnut street, at the corner of Wil- 
low street ; 1 on Salem street, near the intersection of Willie street ; 
1 on Cross street, between Fletcher and Willie streets ; 1 on Cen- 
tral street, Hosford square ; 1 on Myrtle street, at the head of Fifth 
street, Centralville; 1 on Union street, at the corner of Chapel 
street ; 1 on the corner of Westford and Grand streets ; 1 on Fourth 
street, near Read street; 1 on Chapel street, at the corner of Keene 
street ; 1 on Varney street, near Mt. Vernon street ; 1 on the corner 
of Queen street and Branch street; 1 on the corner of Wilder 
street and Middlesex street ; 1 at the corner of Bridge and Seventh 
streets ; 1 on Howard street, at the corner of Hale street ; 1 on 
Forest street. Average amount of water in each, 20,000 gallons. 



COMMON SEWERS AND RESERVOIRS 

BUILT BY THE CITY, AND COST OF THE SAME. 



From the Merrimack Canal through Market street to 

Concord River, - -. $6,708 19 

From the Merrimack Canal, westerly, and from the 
Western Canal, easterly, through Lowell street, 
crossing under Merrimack street, through Tilden 
street, to the Merrimack River, 13,800 00 

On Central street, from Charles street to Union street, 231 31 

On Alder and Bartlett streets, from Livermore street 

to Merrimack River, 714 50 

On Merrimack street, from Cabot street, westerly, to 
the west side of Austin street, also from Race 
street to Suffolk street, 635 58 

On Race street, from the northerly side of the North- 
ern Canal to Merrimack street, 865 87 

On Moody street, from Race street, westerly, to the 

west side of Austin street, 855 36 

On Dodge street, from Race street to Suffolk street,. . 184 68 

On Cabot street, from a point near Northern Canal, 

southerly, to Salem street, 539 95 

On Middlesex street, from Pearl street, westerly,, 200 

feet, 485 22 

On Church and Lawrence streets, from Concord River 
to George street, and from Church to Tyler 
street,..' 1,247 31 

From south side of City Hall, back of Merrimack 
street, to Unitarian Church, to Middle street, 
through Central street, entering the sewer at the 
corner of Central and Market streets, 1,112 00 

Through Middle street, from Central to Merrimack 

Canal, 1,498 92 

From Garnet street to Concord River, near Warren 

street,.. 4,980 37 

On Jefferson street, from Lowell to Lewis street,.. ... 385 00 

On Gorham street, from Middlesex to Charles street, 924 93 

Amount carried forward^.. «. • $35,169 19 



180 auditor's report. 



Amount brought forward, $35,169 19 

On Willow street, 297 00 

On Merrimack street, from Nesmith to Fayette street, 935 35 

On Merrimack and Prescott streets, 503 62 

On Merrimack street, near Colburn street, 255 30 

On Garnet street, 102 50 

From Pawtucket Canal, through Middlesex street to 

Grand street 526 11 

On Suffolk street, 1,137 33 

On Bartlett street, 350 40 

On Gorham street, from Union to Auburn street, .... 625 94 
Through Middlesex to Queen street, and Queen to 

Somerset street, 529 07 

On Fenwick street, 526 60 

On Dummer street, from Lowell to Mechanic street,.. 349 48 

On Worthen street, from Lowell to Mechanic street, 563 83 
On Lee street, to John street, and through John to 

Vine street and passage-way east of the Museum ; 

also a drain through John street avenue,,,..-,.... 555 23 

On Middlesex street, 352 12 

On Alder street, 249 52 

From Central, through Charles and Lawrence streets, 

to Concord River, 2,090 11 

On Hurd street, 703 76 

On Middlesex place, 281 49 

On Merrimack Street, from Race street, westerly,. ... 41 66 

On Lowell street, from Suffolk to Cabot street, 508 37 

On Central street, from Union to Ames street, 518 34 

Through part of Andover, through Clay, and partly 

through Oak and High streets, 2,269 31 

Through Elliot to Appleton street, westerly, to Thorn- 
dike street, , 1,455 66 

On Merrimack street, from Tremont to Hanover street, 317 75 

On Middlesex street, from Grand street, westerly,.. « 187 81 

On Ash street, ,.I 147 20 

On Dutton street, 493 24 

On Chestnut street,.., ^ 340 69 

On Adams street, .' 885 80 

On Union and Chapel streets, 724 85 

On Third street, 748 16 

On Kirk avenue, 238 64 

On East Merrimack street, , 231 43 

On Bridge street, .. , 1,500 00 

On Branch street, . , «■ . 152 44 

On Water street, 383 54 

On Salem street, •« 217 53 



Amount carried forward, ...... , $57,466 37 



COMMON SEWERS AND RESERVOIRS. 



181 



Amount brought forward, $57,466 37 

On Jackson street, 185 89 

On Fourth street, 927 98 

On Adams and Lagrange streets, 1 ,257 4 7 

On Fayette street, 192 95 

On Hanover street, 85 85 

On Merrimack street, from Decatur street, westerly, 136 55 

On Andover street, > 418 99 

On Tyler street, 468 24 

On Branch street, 764 58 

On Fifth street, 469 41 

On Favor street, 132 22 

On Dutton street, from Lowell street, westerly, 234 51 

On Suffolk street, from Cross street, southerly, 459 32 

On River street, 301 30 

On Andover street, 490 00 

On Pawtucket street, , 423 00 

On Seventh street, 282 00 

On Cady and Lawrence streets, 620 92 

On North street, 331 80 

On Warren street, sixty feet from Central street,.. . . 181 30 

On John street avenue, 156 44 

On Bridge street, commencing at Tenth street, to 

Ferry Lane Road, 258 42 

On Elm, Linden, Union, to Auburn street, 1,667 74 

On Winter street, .> 632 10 

On Crosby street, from Meadow River Brook, to Cen- 
tral street, 3,309 43 

On Sixth street, from Read street, to the sewer in 

Bridge street, 650 50 

On Mount Vernon street, from Rock street to Fulton 

street, 2,128 00 

On Cedar street to Keene street, 1,304 55 

On Marion street, from Cross street to Lagrange 

street, 1,165 70 

On Branch street, from School street to a point near 

Loring street, 964 00 

On Chapel, Walnut and Central streets, from Crosby 

street to near Gorham street, 3,834 86 

On Cross street, from Fletcher street, westerly, to 

Mount Vernon street, 1,398 15 

On passage-way between Fletcher street and Willie 

street, crossing Broadway, to land of A. L. 

Brooks, 372 40 

On Wamesit street, from Lawrence street, to within 

about seventy-seven feet of Hosford square, 1,302 16 

Amount carried forward, $84,975 10 



182 auditor's report. 



Amount brought forward, $84,975 10 

On Taylor street, from Wamesit street to Concord 

River, 1,402 95 

On Oak street, from Clay street to Harrison street,. . 800 57 

On South street, from Summer street to the sewer on 

Appleton street, .. 895 81 

For re-constructing sewer from Concord River through 
Church street to George street ; thence through 
George street to Tyler street ; thence through 
Tyler street to Central street • thence through 
Central street to Charles street ; thence through 
Charles street to Gorham street ; thence through 
Summer street to the South Common (no assess- 
ments made), «». 27,640 51 

On Central street, from present sewer in said street, 

at the intersection of Central and Chapel streets, 

northerly, through Central street to Elm street,. . 4,559 80 

On Lawrence street, from present sewer in Taylor 

street, northerly, through Lawrence street to 

Richmond avenue, 3,179 80 

On Gorham and Central streets, from Walnut street 
through Gorham street to Central street ; thence 

through Central street to Crosby street, 5,356 50 

On Highland street, from Gorham street, 3,153 80 

On Thorndike street, , 2,932 75 

On School and Grove streets, from Branch street 
through School street to Grove street ; thence 

through Grove street to Coral street, 2,847 88 

On East Merrimack street, 494 00 

On Dutton street, from Market street to Broadway,. . 2,582 06 
On Jewett, West-Sixth and Hampshire streets, from 
Coburn street through Jewett street to the Pump- 
ing Station of the Lowell Water Works ; thence 
through West-Sixth street, from the sewer in 
Jewett street, to the old stone drain which crosses 
West-Sixth street, and from the sewer in West- 
Sixth street, northerly, about fifty feet in Hamp- 
shire street, 2,817 16 

On Howard street, and Howard street outlet, between 

Middlesex and Railroad streets, » 6,304 94 

From intersection of Suffolk street and Broadway, 
through Suffolk, Moody, Cabot and Perkins 
streets, and vacant land, to Merrimack River, .. . . 74,101 47 
On Clark street, and Hancock and Willie avenues, 
from Clark street through Hancock and Willie 
avenues to Salem street, 1,181 78 



Amount carried forward, $225,226 



COMMON SEWERS AND RESERVOIRS. 183 

Amount brought forward, $225,226 88 

On South street, from Summer street, 1,840 70 

On High street, from Everett street to Andover street, 658 14 
On West-Fourth and West-Fifth streets, from Bridge 
street through West-Fifth street and West-Fourth 

street to Jewett street, 1,888 92 

On Davidson, Howe and Wall streets, from Merri- 
mack street to the Concord River, 2,284 07 

On Carleton street, from Marshal street to Middlesex 
street, and in East Pine street, from Nichols 

to Carleton street, 1,394 83 

On Railroad street, 705 25 

On Eleventh street, from a point near Methuen 

street, to Bridge street, 1 ,380 28 

On Summer street, 3,246 68 

On Willow street, from Andover street, 618 60 

On Merrimack and Prescott streets, from a point op- 
posite the City Government Building to a point 

opposite storehouse of Prescott Mills, 9,715 79 

On Salem, Dane and Fletcher streets, 2,728 94 

On Broadway, from Suffolk street to Fletcher street,.. 4,800 73 

On Hurd, Central and Jackson streets, 3,283 15 

For re-constructing sewer from Appleton street, 
through Gorham and Union streets, to a point 

near South street, * 1,799 68 

For re-constructing sewer on Andover street, from 

Clay street to Harrison street, 719 05 

On West-Fourth street, 493 42 

On Second street, from Bridge street to Read street,. . 784 43 
On River street, from a point opposite Coburn street, 

and through passage-way to Merrimack River,.. . 3,882 78 
On East Merrimack street, from Park street, easterly, 

and outlet to Merrimack River, 2,284 84 

On Pleasant street, 1,103 37 

On Cabot and Salem streets, 9,511 06 

On Merrimack street, from Gage street, easterly,. ... 1,531 75 

On Moody street, from Cabot street, westerly, 2,945 60 

On Fletcher street, from Dane street to Pawtucket 

street, 398 82 

On School street, north of Pawtucket street, 668 82 

On Broadway, from Fletcher street to a point near 

the Pawtucket Canal, 8,180 54 

On Little street, 176 24 

On Lewis street, , 917 37 

On Hurd street and outlet to Concord River, 8,452 91 

On Chapel street, from Walnut street, northerly, ... 790 13 

Amount carried forward, $304,363 77 



184 auditor's report. 



Amount brought forward, $304,363 77 

On Gorham street, from River Meadow Brook, south- 
erly, 407 17 

On Loring and Grove streets, 1,639 70 

On Oak street, 112 57 



RESERVOIRS. 

On Union street, at foot of Chapel street, . . 

On Tyler street, at junction with George street,. .... 

On Chestnut street, at junction with Willow street,. . 

On Cross street, 

*On East Merrimack street, at junction with High 
street, and one on Salem street, near Common 
street, both, 

On Central street, at foot of Elm street, 

In Centralville, 

On Branch street, 

On Fourth street, Centralville, 

On Westford street, 

On Chapel street, 

On Varney street, 

On the corner of Wilder and Middlesex streets,. . 

On the corner of Bridge and Seventh streets 

On the corner of Howard and Hale streets, 

On Forest street, 



* East Merrimack Street Reservoir dispensed with. 



$306,523 


21 


$680 00 


669 


00 


763 


00 


675 
l 


00 


l 

1,964 


82 


600 


00 


650 


00 


588 


86 


397 


88 


280 


48 


474 


21 


474 


21 


994 


44 


1,472 


94 


1,146 


92 


770 


00 


$12,601 


76 



PEOPERTY OWNED BY THE CITY, NOT 
AVAILABLE. 



Old Burial Ground on School street. 

Burial Ground on the Boston Road, south of the Railroad. 

Burial Ground on the same Road, south of the last named. 



24 



RECAPITULATION OF ASSETS OF TEE CITY. 



Real Estate, $747,330 67 

Water Works, 1,876,128.50 

Personal Property in care of Superintendent of 

Streets, ....". 23,919 13 

Personal Property in care of Superintendent of Alms- 
house, 14,015 55 

Personal Property in care of Superintendent of Street 

Lamps,... 17,403 00 

Personal Property in care of Superintendent of Public 

Buildings, 2,931 60 

Personal Property in care of Chief Engineer, 42,000 00 

Fire Alarm Telegraph in care of Chief Engineer, 18,000 00 

Personal Property at City Marshal's Office and Police 

Station, and Police Court Room, 2,460 20 

Personal Property at the Government Building, Hunt- 
ington Half and Jackson Hall, 9,000 00 

Personal Property in School-houses, 10,000 00 

Books in the City Library, 1 2,800 00 

Debts due the City, 71,879 44 

Bell in High" Street Church Tower, 500 00 

Bell on Varnum School-house, . <■ 1,000 00 

Cast-Steel Bell on Market House Building, 900 00 

Flag Staffs, , . . 1,000 00 

Furniture in Armories and Drill Rooms, 500 00 

Furniture in Ward Rooms, 5000 

Cash in Treasury, less draft for December, 1875,. .... 158,429 37 

83,010,247 46 



LEASES AND BENTS OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 
OWNED BY THE CITY. 



Per Annum. 

Rented to Carleton & Hovey, one store in City Gov- 
ernment Building, ." '. $1,300 00 

Leased to William Bascom, one store in City Govern- 
ment Building, five years, from January 1, 1872, 700 00 

Rented to E. C. Leslie & Co., one store in City Gov- 
ernment Building, 940 00 

Leased to Alfred Gilman & Son, one store in City 
Government Building, four years, from Januar3 r 
1,1873, 900 00 

Leased to Charles P. Talbot & Co., store and cellar in 
Market House Building, for five years, from Oc- 
tober 1, 1873, s l r 200 00 

Rented to Commonwealth, for Armories, 2,000 00 

Rented to J. W. Bennett, land, corner of Middlesex 

and Grand streets, 50 00 

Rented to County of Middlesex, Police Court Rooms, 750 00 

Rented to J. J. Furbish, tenement No. 27 Kirk street, 300 00 

Rented to Mrs. C. S. Finn, tenement No. 25 Kirk 

street, 400 00 

$8,540 00 



LANDS AND BUILDINGS FOE WHICH THE 
CITY PATS EENT. 



Per Annum. 

The City pays to the Boston & Lowell Railroad Com- 
pany, for ground rent for Huntington and Jack- 
son Hall Building, (on lease), $475 00 

The City pays on lease to Hocum Hosford, for rent of 
rooms for City Library (Masonic Temple) for ten 
years from January 1, 1872, 1,200 00 

The City pays on lease to Merchants National Bank 
for rent of rooms, for purposes connected with 
the Water Works, for five years from April 1, 
1873,. , 550 00 



$2,225 00 
DAVID CHASE, Auditor. 



TREASURER'S ACCOUNT, 1878. 



Citt of Lowell, 
City Treasurer's Office, January 11, 1876. 
.To the City Council: 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to present herewith an account of the 
Receipts and Payments from January 1 to December 31, 1875. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN H. McALVIN, City Treasurer. 



In Common Council, January 11, 1876. 

Read and referred to the Joint Standing Committee on Accounts ; sent 

up for concurrence. 

DAVID CHASE, Cleric. 

In Board of Aldermen, January 11, 1876. 

Read and referred in concurrence. 

SAMUEL A. McPHETRES, City Clerk. 



190 



auditor's report. 



Dr. City of Lowell, in account current with John H. McAlvin, 

For Cash paid on account of — 

Schools, $125,879 86 

School Houses, 41,990 36 

Streets, 146,543 93 

Reserved Fund, 34,289 42 

Paupers, 27,882 91 

Police, 57,663 08 

Fire Department, 44,736 81 

Sewers, 83,972 30 

Commons, 5,154 57 

Printing, 3,457 68 

Lighting, . 22,390 50. 

Repairs Public Buildings, 49,196 28 

Library, 4,576 94 

Water Works, 280,584 07 

Health, 1,425 08 

Salaries, 20,775 00 

State Aid, 13,399 68 

Interest, 35, 165 80 

Temporary Loans, 61,000 00 

City Debt, 20,500 00 

State Tax, 38,580 00 

County Tax 24,750 16 

National Bank Tax, 21,525 43 

Sinking Fund, 25,000 00 

$1,190,439 86 

Balance in the Treasury, January 1, 1876, 197,632 38 

$1,388,072 24 



treasurer's account. 191 

City Treasurer, January 1 to December 31, 1875. Cr. 

By Cash on hand January 1, 1875, $348,342 65 

By Cash received on account of — 

Schools, '. 985 55 

School Houses, 9,469 64 

Streets, 41,134 54 

Eeserved Fund, 63,807 64 

Paupers, 7,446 53 

Police, 6,211 45 

Pire Department, 3,097 49 

Sewers, 9,421 79 

Commons, 432 50 

Lighting, 57 21 

Eepairs Public Buildings, 216 79 

Library, 3,610 65 

Water Works, 94,908 14 

Health, 13 00 

State Aid, , 14,521 51 

Interest, 8,623 19 

Taxes of 1873, 7,172 10 

Taxes of 1874, 16,117 10 

Taxes of 1875, 650,333 65 

Temporary Loans, 61,000 00 

City Debt, 10,000 00 

Corporation Tax, 26,872 55 

National Bank Tax, 4,276 57 



.$1,388,072 24 



CITY OF LOWELL, 



In Committee on Accounts, 

January 21st, 1876. 

To the City Council : 

Gentlemen, — The Joint Committee on Accounts for the year 1876, to 
whom was referred the account current of John H. Mc Alvin, City Treasurer, 
from January 1 to December 31, 1875, hereby certify that, in pursuance of 
Chapter First, Section Seventh, of the Ordinances of the City of Lowell, we 
have examined the said account, and find the same correctly cast, and all 
payments therein charged sustained by proper vouchers. 

"We find there has been received into the Treasury from all sources, 
from January 1 to December 31, 1875, the sum of one million, three hundred 
and eighty-eight thousand and seventy-two dollars and twenty-four cents 
($ 1,388,072.24), and there has been paid from the Treasury during the same 
pei'iod the sum of one million, one hundred and ninety thousand, four hun- 
dred and thirty-nine dollars and eighty-six cents ($1,190,439.86), leaving 
a balance in the hands of the City Treasurer, December 31, 1875, of one 
hundred and ninety-seven thousand, six hundred and thirty-two dollars and 
thirty-eight cents ($197,632.38). 

"We find there has been received into the Treasury from all sources, 
from December 31, 1875, to January 21, 1876, the day of the date of this 
report, the sum of two hundred and seventeen thousand, two hundred and 
eighty-eight dollars and forty-eight cents ($217,288.48), and there has been 
paid from the Treasury, during the same period, all of said payments being 
sustained by proper vouchers, the sum of forty-seven thousand, one hun- 
dred and eighty-seven dollars and seventy-eight cents ($47,187.78), leaving 
on the day of the date of this report, a cash balance of one hundred and 
seventy thousand, one hundred dollars and seventy cents ($170,100.70) in 
the hands of the City Treasurer, which we have verified by an actual exam- 
ination of all assets in the hands of the City Treasurer. 



Respectfully submitted, 



GEORGE E. STANLEY, 
CHARLES F. BELDEN, 
EDWARD STOCKMAN, 
J. F. KIMBALL, 
CHARLES RUNELS, 



Joint Committee 

on Accounts, 

for 1876. 



In Common Council, January 25, 1876. 
Read and accepted ; sent up for concurrence. 

DAVID CHASE, Clerk. 
In Board op Aldermen, January 25, 1876. 
Read and accepted in concurrence. 

SAMUEL A. McPHETRES, City Clerk. 



WATER LOAN SINKING FUND 
ACCOUNT. 



City of Lowell, 
City Treasurer's Office, January 11, 1876. 
To the City Council ; 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to present herewith a statement of the 
condition of the City of Lowell Water Loan Sinking Fund Account. 
Kespectfully submitted. 

JOHN H. McALVIN, City Treasurer. 



In Common Council, January 11, 1876. 

Read and referred to the Joint Standing Committee on Acconnts ; sent 

up for concurrence. 

DAVID CHASE, Clerk. 

In Board of Aldermen, January 11, 1876. 
Eead and referred in concurrence. 

SAMUEL A. McPHETRES, City Clerk. 



25. 



194 auditor's report. 



Dr. City oe Lowell Water 

Eor Cost of 27 $1,000 City of Lowell Water Loan Bonds, $26,041 50 

Cost of 7 $1 ,000 City of Lawrence Water Loan Bonds, ..... 6,647 67 

Cost of 19 $1,000 City of Lawrence Municipal Bonds, 18,328 67 

Cost of 2 $1,000 City of Chelsea Bonds, 2,000 00 

Cost of accrued interest on 2 City of Chelsea Bonds, 10 67 

Cost of 26 $1,000 City of Bangor Water Loan Bonds, 26,390 00 

Cost of accrued interest on 26 City of Bangor Water Loan 

Bonds, 381 33 

$79,799 84 
Balance on interest in Appleton National Bank, ». 699 13 

$80,498 97 



WATER LOAN SINKING FUND ACCOUNT. 195 

Loan Sinking Fund, Cr. 

By Cash Receipts from 1874 and previous years, $52,184 19 

Cash appropriated by the City Council in 1875, 25,000 00 

Cash received in 1875 from amount invested 3,314 78 

$80,498 97 



CITY OF LOWELL, 



In Committee on Accounts, 

January 21, 1876. 
To the City Council : 

Gentlemen, — The Joint Committee on Accounts for the j'ear 1876, to 
whom was referred the statement of the condition of the City of Lowell 
Water Loan Sinking Fund Account to December 31, 1875, hereby certify 
that we have examined said account, and find that the whole amount re- 
ceived and credited to said account up to December 31, 1875, was eighty 
thousand, four hundred and ninety-eight dollars and ninety-seven cents 
($80,498.97), and that said amount is invested as follows : Twenty-seven 
$1,000 City of Lowell Water Loan Bonds, at a cost of $26,041.50; seven 
$1,000 City of Lawrence Water Loan Bonds, at a cost of $6,647.67; Nine- 
teen $1,000 City of Lawrence Municipal Bonds, at a cost of $18,328.67; two 
$1,000 City of Chelsea Bonds, at a cost of $2,000, and accrued interest of 
$10.67, making $2,010.67; twenty-six $1,000 City of Bangor Water Loan 
Bonds, at a cost of $26,390, and accrued interest of $381.33, making 
$26,761.33; Cash on interest in the Appleton National Bank, amounting to 
$699.13, making the total amount invested, $80,498.97. All of the foregoing- 
Bonds we find in the hands of John H. McAlvin, City Treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE E. STANLEY, 1 
CHARLES F. BELDEN, f Joint Committee 
EDWARD STOCKMAN, }■ on Accounts, 
J. F. KIMBALL, for 1876. 

CHARLES RUNELS, J 

In Common Council, January 25, 1876. 
Read and accepted ; sent up for concurrence. 

DAVID CHASE, Clerk. 

In Board of Aldekmen, January 25, 1876. 
Read and accepted in concurrence. 

SAMUEL A. McPHETRES, City Cleric. 



INDEX 



Abatement of Taxes, ... 150 

Appropriations, Expenditures and Balances, 154 

Auditor's Report, , 5 

Carney Medal Fund, 152 

City Debt, 145 

City Library, 126 

Commons, 109 

Common Sewers, 179 

Corporation Tax, 143 

County Tax, 147 

Debts Due the City, 160 

Debts Due from the City on "Water Loans, 158 

Fire Department, 88 

Health Account, 113 

Interest on City Debt, . .'. 146 

Lands and Buildings for which the City pays Rent, 188 

Leases and Rents, 187 

Lighting Streets and Public Buildings, 113 

National Bank Tax, 144 

Notes Due from the City, 156 

Paupers, ...... . 68 

Personal Property, 163 

Police, 81 

Printing and Advertising, Ill 

Property not Available, 185 

Real Estate, 161 

Recapitulation of Assets, 186 

Repairs of Public Buildings, 117 

Reserved Fund, 55 

Reservoirs, 184 

Roads and Bridges, 31 

Salaries, 128 

Schools, 9 

School-houses, 26 

Setting Trees, 130 

Sewers and Drains, 96 

Sinking Fund, for Reduction of the Water Debt, 153 

State Aid for Disabled Soldiers, Sailors, etc., 133 

State Tax, 147 

Taxes, 147 

Temporary Loan, 151 

Treasurer's Account, , 189 

Water Works, 134-162 

Water Loan Sinking Fund, 193 



ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF LOWELL, CHAPTER 1, 

SECTION 5. 

" No bill or claim against the City, other than judgments of the Judicial 
Courts, shall he allowed or passed by the Committee on Accounts, unless 
such bill or claim shall be approved or certified by some agent, officer or 
committee, authorized on behalf of the City to make the contract or cause 
the expenditure to be incurred ; or unless such expenditure be expressly 
required by some specific vote of the Council." 



CLAIMS AGAINST THE CITY. 

In Committee on Accounts, January 21, 1876. 

Ordered, That hereafter all Pauper bills be presented to the Auditor on 
or before the 28th day of each month. 

2d — That all other bills be made up to include the last day of the 
month, and that, duly certified, they be presented to the Auditor on or 
before the first clay of the following month, and be payable on the tenth. 

All bills presented for payment must specify what the article or articles 
were for — and, when for labor, where it was performed — with proper 
dates. 

Items charged to different appropriations should be made out on sepa- 
rate bills. 

All bills not approved and presented as above will lie over till the next 
month. 

GEOEGE E. STANLEY, 
CHARLES F. BELDEN, 
EDWARD STOCKMAN, } 
J. F. KIMBALL, 
CHARLES RUNELS, 



1 



Committee on 
Accounts. 



The Auditor's Office is in the City Government Building. Office 
hours — from 9 to 12 A. M., and from 2 to 5 o'clock P. M. 



TO PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS AGAINST THE CITY. 

It is very desirable that bills presented for payment should specify what 
the article or articles were for — and, when for labor, where it was per- 
formed — with proper dates. 

If persons having bills against the City would be more careful in speci- 
fying particulars, it would enable the Auditor to prepare his Annual Report 
with much less trouble. 

DAVID CHASE, Auditor. 



The amount due semi-annually to members of the Fire Department 
becomes payable on and after the 10th of May and November. 



TREASURER'S OFFICE HOURS. 

From 9 A. M. to 12 M., and from 2 to 5 P. M. During time for receiv- 
ing taxes, from 8 A. M., to 12 M. ; from 2 to 5, and from 7 to 9 P. M. ; 
closed Wednesday and Thursday evenings. 



CITY DOCUMENT CITY OF LOWELL. 



SALARIES OF THE OFFICERS 




City ox I^Sili Lowe] 1 . 



FOR THE YEAR 



1876-77 



Brown & Chase, Printers. 



CITY OF LOWELL. 



IN THE YEAR EIGHTEEN HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-FIVE, 



KESOLUTIOlSr 

ESTABLISHING THE SALARIES OF THE OFFICERS OF 
THE CITY OF LOWELL FOR THE YEAR 1876-7. 



RESOLVED, by the Board of Aldermen and Common 
Council of the City of Lowell, in City Council as- 
sembled, as folloivs : 

The Salaries of the several City officers for the 
year beginning on the first Monday in January, one 
thousand eight hundred and seventy-six, shall be as 
herein mentioned ; to be paid monthly, unless herein 
otherwise ordered. 

Section 1. The salary of the Mayor shall be at 
the rate of two thousand dollars per annum. 

Sec. 2. The salary of the City Clerk shall be 
at the rate of eighteen hundred dollars per annum. 

Sec. 3. The salary of the City Treasurer shall 
be at the rate of twenty-four hundred dollars per 



SALARIES. 



annum for performing the duties of City Treasurer 
and Collector of Taxes. He shall annually give a bond 
in the sum of fifty thousand dollars, with good and 
sufficient sureties satisfactory to the Mayor and Alder- 
men, for the faithful performance of his duties, and 
to account for all sums of money received in the sales 
of Water Bonds and the collection of Water Rates, 
and in the capacity of City Treasurer and Collector 
of Taxes, and shall also render an account annually 
of all moneys invested by him in the City of Low- 
ell Water Loan sinking fund. 

Sec. 4. The salary of the Auditor of Accounts 
shall be at the rate of fifteen hundred dollars per 
annum. 

Sec. 5. The salary of the City Solicitor shall 
be at the rate of fifteen hundred dollars per annum, 
which shall be in full for all services rendered the 
city. 

Sec. 6. The salary of the Civil Engineer shall 
be at the rate of twenty-four hundred dollars per 
annum, which shall be in full for services as Civil 
Engineer and Engineer of the Water Board, and he 
shall devote his whole time to the service of the city. 
He shall be allowed such assistance as the chairman 
of the Joint Standing Committee on Streets, the chair- 
man of the Joint Standing Committee on Sewers and 



SALARIES. '6 



Drains, and the chairman of the Lowell Water Board 
may determine. 

Sec. 7. The salary of the City Physician and 
Superintendent of Burials shall be at the rate of seven 
hundred dollars per annum; and he shall furnish all 
medicines used by him in performing the duties of 
his office. 

Sec 8. The salary of the Librarian of the City 
Library shall be at the rate of eleven hundred dollars 
per annum. 

Sec. 9. The salary of the Clerk of the Common 
Council shall be at the rate of three hundred dollars 
per annum. 

Sec 10. The salary of the Messenger of the City 
Council shall be at the rate of eleven hundred dol- 
lars per annum. 

Sec 11. The salary of the Measurer of Wood and 
Bark, in the rear of the Market House building, shall 
be at the rate of seven hundred dollars per annum ; 
and he shall account for all fees received by him in 
his official capacity, and shall pay the same into the 
Treasury monthly. The salary of any additional meas- 
urers of wood and bark shall be at such a rate as 
the Mayor and Aldermen may from time to time de- 
termine, provided that the same shall not exceed the 
amount of fees received. 



SALARIES. 



Sec. 12. The salary of the Pound Keeper shall 
be at the rate of twenty-five dollars per annum. 

Sec. 13. The Joint Committee on Accounts, 
and Joint Committee on Finance may provide such 
clerical assistance in the offices of the City Clerk, 
City Treasurer, Auditor of Accounts, Librarian of the 
City Library, and Assessors of Taxes as they deem 
necessary, the expense thereof to be charged to the 
Reserved Fund. 

POLICE. 

Sec. 14. The salary of the City Marshal shall 
be at the rate of eighteen hundred dollars per an- 
num ; and he shall furnish a horse and carriage for 
the use of the Marshal and his deputy. 

Sec. 15. The compensation of the Deputy Marshal 
and Captain of the Night Watch shall be at the rate 
of three dollars and twenty-five cents per day, each. 

The compensation of the regular Day Police shall be 
at the rate of two dollars and seventy-five cents per day. 

The compensation of the Night Police, and all other 
Police officers, shall be at the rate of two dollars and 
seventy-five cents per day. 

Sec. 16. Police officers acting as tythingmen shall 
receive no extra compensation therefor. All fees re- 
ceived by the officers mentioned in the two preceding 



SALARIES. 



sections, for attendance as witnesses, or for any other 
service in an official capacity, shall be paid by the 
officer receiving the same, to the City Treasurer. Pro- 
vided, however, that said officers need not account for 
any fees for travel and attendance before the Supreme 
Judicial and Superior Court, as witnesses. 

Sec. 17. The Standing Justice of the Police Court 
of Lotvett shall be paid at the rate of one hundred 
dollars per annum, for receiving complaints, issuing 
warrants, and trying cases under the Forty-Second 
Chapter of the General Statutes, or any subsequent 
Act, or Ordinance, concerning truant children and ab- 
sentees from school. 

SUPERINTENDENTS and INSPECTORS. 

Sec. 18. The salary of the Superintendent of 
Streets shall be at the rate of seventeen hundred dol- 
lars per annum. 

Sec 19. The salary of the Superintendent of 
Public Buildings shall be at the rate of fifteen hun- 
dred dollars per annum. The city shall furnish a 
horse and carriage for the use of himself and the men 
under his charge. 

Sec 20. The salary of the Superintendent of the 
Water Works shall be at the rate of eighteen hundred 
dollars per annum, and he shall furnish a horse and 
carriage for his own use. 



SALARIES. 



Sec. 21. The salary of the Superintendent of 
City /Scales shall be sixty per centum of the fees 
received by him per annum, and he shall settle with 
the Treasurer monthly. When he and the Measurer 
of Wood and Bark are one and the same person, he 
shall receive two hundred dollars per annum. 

The salary of any additional weigher of hay and 
other articles shall be at such rate as the Mayor and 
Aldermen may from time to time determine, provided 
that the same shall not exceed the amount of fees 
received. 

Sec. 22. The salary of the Inspector of Milk 
shall be at the rate of twenty-five dollars per annum. 

Sec 23. The salary of the Sealer of Weights and 
Measures shall be at the rate of two hundred dollars 
per annum, and no fees shall be charged for any offi- 
cial duty he may perform. 

ASSESSORS 7 DEPARTMENT. 

Sec. 24. The salary of the Chairman of the 
Board of Assessors shall be one thousand dollars per 
annum ; and the salary of each of the other Assessors 
shall be eight hundred dollars per annum ; and the 
said Assessors shall make out and distribute the tax 
bills. The Assessors shall devote their whole time, 
from March 1st to October 15th, to the service of 
the city, and shall engage in no other business or 



SALARIES. 



calling during that time. They shall jointly make a 
valuation of the real estate in the city, and enter 
the same in a book to be kept for mutual reference, 
the same to be done before entering upon a subdi- 
vision of their duties of assessing in May. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Sec. 25. The salaries of the several members 
of the Fire Department for the year beginning Janu- 
ary first, one thousand eight hundred and seventy-six 
shall be as herein mentioned, to be paid semi-annually 
unless otherwise ordered. 

The salary of the Chief Engineer shall be at the 
rate of fourteen hundred dollars per annum, payable 
monthly, which shall be in full payment for all ser- 
vices which may be required of him by the ■ City 
Council ; and he shall devote his whole time to the 
duties of his office. 

The salary of the First Assistant Engineer shall be 
at the rate of one hundred and fifty dollars, and of 
other Assistant Engineers at the rate of one hun- 
dred and twenty-five dollars, each, per annum. 

The Secretary of the Board of Engineers, who shall 
be a member of the Board, shall receive twenty-five 
dollars additional, which shall be in full payment for 
all the services which may be required of him by the 
Mayor and Aldermen, the Chief Engineer, and the 
Board of Engineers. 



SALARIES. 



The Foremen and Clerks of the respective Hose, 
Hook and Ladder, and Steam Fire Engine Companies, 
shall be paid at the rate of one hundred dollars, each, 
per annum. 

The Stewards of Hose Companies shall be paid 
at the rate of one hundred and thirty dollars per 
annum. 

Said Stewards shall be members of the Compa- 
nies for which they act, and said sums shall be in 
full payment for all their services as Stewards and 
Members of Companies. 

Drivers of Steamers and Hook and Ladder Car- 
riages, who shall perform all the duties of Stewards, 
shall be paid two dollars per day. 

Engineers of Steam Fire Engines shall be paid at 
the rate of three hundred dollars per annum. 

Assistant Engineers of Steam Fire Engines shall be 
paid at the rate of one hundred and twenty-five dollars 
per annum. 

All other Members of Steam Fire Engine, Hose, 
and Hook and Ladder Companies, shall be paid at 
the rate of ninety dollars per annum. 

Sec. 26. Whenever any person in the employ- 
ment of the city shall demand payment of his salary, 
or any part thereof, it shall be the duty of the Audi- 
tor and City Treasurer to deduct therefrom any and 
all sums of money due from such officer to the city. 



SALARIES. 



In Board of Aldermen, December 23, 1875. 
Passed. FRANCIS JEWETT, Mayor. 

In Common Council, December 28, 1875. 
Passed. ALBERT A. HAGGETT, President. 

Approved, December 29, 1875. 

FRANCIS JEWETT, Mayor. 
A true copy. Attest: 

Samuel A. McPhetres, City Clerk. 



CITY DOCUMENT 



CITY OF 




LOWELL. 



Annual Report 



OF THE 



©iredtoi^ of % City I^iWkfy, 



FOE THE YEAE 1875 



CITY OF LOWELL. 



In Board of Aldermen, Dec. 28, 1875. 
Read and sent to the Common Council. 

SAMUEL A. McPHETRES, City Clerk. 

In Common Council, Dec. 28, 1875. 
Received and read. 

DAVID CHASE, Clerk. 

Times Print. 



REPORT. 



DIRECTORS' ROOM, CITY LIBRARY, ) 

Lowell, December 22, 1875. ) 

To the City Council of Lowell : 

The Directors of the City Library, in compliance with 
the City Ordinance, herewith submit their Annual Report : 

EECEIPTS. 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1875,' 

Appropriation, 

Balance of Dog Tax, 

Subscriptions, 

Catalogues and Supplements, 

Lost Books, • • • • 

FineSj 

Covering Papers, • — • • • • • 



$1,366 


30 


1,500 00 


2,553 


60 


878 


50 


120 


40 


12 


35 


39 


10 


6 


70 



Total Beceipts, .•■■ • $6,476 95 

EXPENDITTJBES. 

Salaries, $1,500 00 

Bent and Heating, • • • • • • • 1,400 00 

Books, ■ 928 24 

Binding, •• 186 90 

Blank Books and Stationery, • 31 42 

Printing and Advertising, 200 93 

Compiling Supplement, • • ■ 25 00 



4 REPORT OF THE 

Postage and Expressage, • ■ • • 4 70 

Gas and Water, 180 95 

Furniture and Repairs, 20 17 

Paper for Covering, 71 29 

Cleaning, • • • 15 18 



Total Expenses, $4 564 78 



Balance, $1,912 17 

CONDITION OF THE LIBRARY. 

Number of volumes added by purchase 749 

'• u " donation 78 

" " in Library ....... 17,604 

Lost and not paid for, 1875 • • 9 

Estimated value of above ' " • $9 

New Subscribers • • • • • 678 

Non Resident Subscribers - 29 

Whole number of Subscribers • 1,728 

Number of volumes delivered • 75,183 

Average daily 267 

The Library now contains 17.604 volumes, or 749 
more volumes than last year, and there has been a gain of 
seventy-five in the number of subscribers ; while during the 
past year there has been a gain of 7,709 in the number of 
volumes delivered, and an average gain of daily delivery of 
twenty-five volumes. 

The Directors (with one exception), having served on 
the Board in previous years, feel that they are competent 
judges of its condition as compared with its past history, 
and they take pleasure in testifying to its present literary 
and financial status, as being very much superior in its 



DIRECTORS OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 5 

workings for the current year, than in any year since its or- 
ganization. 

The present commodious rooms ; the constant increase 
in the number of volumes ; the cordial support of the City 
Council, by its appropriations ; the continued interest on 
the part of its subscribers ; and the energetic efficiency and 
courtesy of its Librarian, who, by his yearly acquirements 
in the position, gains a greater knowledge of the wishes 
and tastes of its patrons, and also becomes more familiar 
with books, and their positions in the Library ; these are 
the reasons, which seem to us of importance in causing the 
present prosperity of the Library. 

The Directors would here appeal to the citizens of 
Lowell, to transfer from their homes to the Library, any, or 
all the Books, Papers, Pamphlets, Manuscripts, etc., etc., 
which relate in any way to the early history of Lowell ; as 
there they can be kept safely for reference, and in the 
future may be of inestimable value to the Statician or Anti- 
quarian. 

Thankful for the opportunity afforded us, of taking 
part in the pleasant duties connected with the City Library, 
and of working under its refining influences and associa- 
tions, with the earnest wish and expectation that it will 
constantly increase in usefulness, we transfer our duties to 
our successors in office. 



REPORT OF THE 



LIST OF DONORS TO THE LIBRARY. 



DONORS. 



Allen Nathan, M. D _ 

American Journal of Education, St. Louis. 

American Unitarian Association 

Beebe Library, Wakefield, Mass 

Bigelow Library, Clinton, Mass 

Boston Public Library 

Boutwell, Hon. George S- 

Bowditch, William I. Esq 

Brookline Public Library 

Buffalo Young Men's Institute 

Bureau of Education, U. S 

Chicago Public Library 

Chicopee Town Library 

Cobden Club, London 

Edwards, Henry, Esq 

Eall River Public Library 

Hartford Young Men's Institute • • 

Hoar, Hon. E. Rockwood 

Hudson, Charles, Esq • 

Lawrence Public Library 

Librarian of Congress 

Library Company of Philadelphia 

Manchester City Library. • • 

Marden, George A. Esq • • . . 

Massachusetts, State of 

McNeill, George E. Esq., Cambridgeport 

Meigs, Capt. J. V- 

Mercantile Library, Pittsburgh 

Mercantile Library Association, N. Y 

Mercantile " Association, San Prancisco. 
Mercantile Library Company, Philadelphia. 

Peabody Institute, Massachusetts 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Scribner, Armstrong & Welford, N. Y 

Smithsonian Institute, Washington 

State Board of Health, Massachusetts 

Taunton Public Library 

Tufts College 

TJ. S. Patent Office 

Watertown Public Library 

Western Publishing Association 

Woburn Library 

Worcester Public Library 



Volumes. Pamphlets 



1 

18 



1 
1 
1 
1 

35 



Total. 



79 



12 
1 

5 
3 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 

12 

2 
1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
1 
2 



1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

2 

2 

1 

10 



53 
1 
8 
1 
1 

~137~ 



Papers. 



10 



DIRECTORS OF CITY LIBRARY. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

FRANCIS JEWETT, 

ALBERT A. HAGGETT, 

HORACE H. KNAPP, 

DANIEL SHERWOOD, 

CHARLES F. TILTON, 

NATHAN W. FRYE, 

GEO. SMITH, 

JOHN STOTT, 

Directors. 



CITY DOCUMENT. 




CITY OF RqSHHES LOWELL 



Annual Report 



OF THE 



CITY PHYSICIAN 



AND 



$upef i:qte:qde:qt of Burikl^. 

EOR THE YEAR 1875. 



CITY OF LOWELL 



In Board of Aldermen, Feb. 22, 1876. 
Read and sent down. 

SAMUEL A. McPHETKES, City Clerk. 

In Common Council, Feb. 22, 1876. 
Received and read. 

DAVID CHASE, Clerk. 

Times Print. 



REPORT. 

OFFICE OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN AND i 

SUPERINTENDENT OF BURIALS, > 

Lowell, February 1876. ) 

To the City Council : 

I have the pleasure, as City Physician and Superin- 
tendent of Burials, to make the following report for the 
year 1875. 

Ten hundred and twenty deaths have occurred during 
the year, one hundred and sixty four less than in 1874. 
The greatest number in any month was in August, one 
hundred and twenty-nine ; the smallest number was in 
November, seventy-five. Upon a basis of 50,000 population, 
which is very nearly the number by the late census, 20.40 per- 
sons died in every thousand, or 2.04 per cent, of the whole 
population. In 1874, 23.68 persons died in every thousand, 
or 2.36 per cent, of the entire population. I regard this as a 
gratifying decrease in the mortality ; and, I cannot but 
think that the improved drainage and the free use of water 
have much to do with the decrease. Many streets which 
three years ago emitted foul odors during the summer 
months and were avoided by citizens in their travels throu gh 



4 REPORT OF CITY PHYSICIAN 

the city, have been made clean and wholesome. Tenement 
houses which formerly relied for their supply of water upon 
pumps, oftentimes at a distance and frequently in dry 
weather drained to the bottom, have been supplied with city 
water. Improved sewerage and free use of water are sani- 
tary measures, the heavy expense of which should be cheer- 
fully borne by the people. 

The sex of those who died were males, 489; females, 
529. Two hundred and thirty-five weie under one year of 
age, 384 under five years, 317 were over sixty, 137 over 
seventy, 39 over eighty and 8 over ninety. 

In the causes of death, consumption takes the lead, 
two hundred and twelve dying from this cause, an increase 
of twenty-eight over the previous year, being more than 
twenty per cent, of all the deaths. Fifty-one died from 
pneumonia, twenty-five of which occurred in the months of 
January, February and December, and twenty-six were dis- 
tributed over the remaining nine months. Cholera infantum 
caused one hundred and five deaths, a decrease of thirty. 
All but two occurred in the months of July, August and 
September. Scarlet fever caused nineteen deaths, a de- 
crease of eighty-one from 1874 ; while croup and diphtheria 
caused respectively thirty-nine and sixteen, a number very 
nearly the same as last year. Among the other more 
prevalent causes were, accident, twenty-one ; apoplexy, 



AND SUPERINTENDENT OF BURIALS. 5 

twenty-three ; brain disease, thirty-one ; cancer, eighteen ; 
convulsions, nineteen ; dropsy, seventeen ; typhoid fever, 
thirty-four ; heart disease, forty ; infantile, sixty-two ; mar- 
asmus, twenty-seven; old age, thirty-fcur; peritonitis, twen- 
ty-three, and paralysis, nineteen. 

Six hundred and ninety-three were born in the United 
States; two hundred and twenty-eight in Ireland; thirty- 
nine in England ; thirty-six in Canada, and the remainder in 
various other countries. Two hundred and fourteen were 
buried in the yards belonging to the cily, one hundred and 
eleven in the Cemetery, five hundred and seventy-four in 
the Catholic yards, and one hundred and twenty-one were 
removed from the city. 

The City Council of 1875 appropriated $2,500 for erect- 
ing a tomb in No. 3 yard. The contract was awarded to 
Lewis D. Gumb for $2,400, and the work is to be completed 
July 1, of the present year. The tomb will hold from fifty 
to seventy-five bodies. It has long been needed and without 
doubt will prove a great convenience to the city and to the 
large number of citizens who will have occasion to use it. 

The whole of No. 3 burying ground will have been 
used up before the close of this year, and I have made ar- 
rangements to use an adjoining strip of land which belongs 
to the city. This strip of land is small and will last but a 
few years. I think it would be a wise policy to purchase 
the land adjoining this yard on the north and west which 



REPORT OF CITY PHYSICIAN 

would afford burial accommodations for many years to 
come. 

Fourteen deaths have occurred during the year at the 
Alms House, seven being caused by consumption, two by old 
age, and one each by apoplexy, heart disease, peritonitis, 
erysipelas and pneumonia. Several of those who died were 
brought to the Alms House in a dying condition. 

With much respect, 

Hermon J. Smith, M. D., 
City Physician and Superintendent of Burials. 



AND SUPERINTENDENT OF BURIALS. 

TABLE 2. 

DEATHS IN EACH MONTH FOR THE LAST TEN YEARS. 





CD 


t^ 


00 


Oi 


o 




CM 


CO 


■* 


U1 


Total 


Months. 


CO 
00 


CD 
CO 


CO 
00 


CO 
00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 


for each 
month 




72 


71 


65 


72 


87 


89 


66 


82 


88 


76 


768 




55 
61 

58 


43 
52 
47 


61 

79 
57 


49 
62 
44 


84 
73 
61 


66 
72 

78 


80 
89 
75 


82 
86 
91 


83 

96 

104 


78 
82 
80 


689 




752 




695 




61 


41 


45 


54 


58 


77 


94 


82 


89 


99 


700 


June 


56 


51 


45 


45 


69 


75 


68 


68 


67 


76 


620 




72 


58 


76 


70 


116 


119 


137 


153 


99 


81 


981 




58 


68 


111 


80 


103 


119 


113 


141 


139 


129 


1061 


September 


67 


57 


78 


74 


76 


135 


114 


119 


143 


97 


960 




51 

72 


50 
56 


75 

84 


74 
64 


82 
70 


88 
54 


72 

69 


07 
65 


96 
90 


84 
60 


779 




684 




66 


46 


81 


75 


73 


61 


71 


85 


90 


78 


720 






Total 


749 


640 


857 


763 


952 


1033 


1048|ll61 


1184 1020 





TABLE 3. 



NUMBER OF DEATHS FROM SOME OF THE MOST PREVALENT DIS- 
EASES IN THE LAST TEN YEARS. 



DISEASES OR 
CAUSES OF DEATH. 


CO 
CO 
CO 


CO 

CO 


CO 

co 

CO 


OS 

CO 
CO 


o 

CO 


CO 


00 


CO 
CO 


oo 


00 


3 

o 

H 




25 

32 

128 

20 

24 

21 

21 

25 

6 

2 

23 

18 


34 
35 
146 
13 
13 

4 
23 
34 

3 
15 
27 
11 


9 
44 
156 
14 
32 
17 
4+ 
42 

8 
95 
26 


18 
33 
147 
23 
15 
11 
39 
31 

7 
4* 
34 

7 


10 
70 
151 
28 
38 

8 
50 
46 
22 
10 
33 

3 


11 

35 

168 
15 
26 

2 
36 
54 

8 
32 
28 

8 


15 

84 
225 
20 
35 
15 
77 
58 
17 
12 
66 
7 


16 
82 
207 
21 
46 
10 
64 
80 
50 
57 
56 
4 


21 

135 

184 

34 

47 

7 

48 

61 

32 

100 

42 

17 


4 

105 

212 

39 

46 

6 

62 

51 

19 
34 
16 


163 




655 




1724 




227 


Disease of Heart 


322 


Dysentery 


101 


Infantile 


464 




482 
180 


Scarlet Fever- 


384 


Diphtheria 


369 
62 







REPORT OF CITY PHYSICIAN 



TABLE 4. 

DEATHS IN LOWELL SINCE ITS INCORPORATION". 



1827 50 

1828 32 

1829 66 

1830 103 

1831 117 

1832 178 

1833 211 

1834 ,221 

1S35 229 

1836 2^3 

1837 301 

1838 407 

1839 340 

1840 407 

1841 434 

1842 473 

1843 364 



1844...... ,..362 

1845 363 

1846 690 

1847 949 

1848 825 

1849 903 

1850 492 

1851 629 

1852 604 

1853 734 

1854 834 

1855 766 

1856 790 

1857... 818 

1858 626 

1859 739 



1860 ; .. 72© 

1861 713 

1862 641 

1863 695 

1864 633 

1865 575 

1866 749 

1867 640 

1868 857 

1869 763 

1870 952 

1871 1033 

1872 -104S 

1873 1161 

1874 1184 

1875 102O 



TABLE 5. 

NATIVITY OF THOSE DECEASED "WITHIN THE YEAR 1875. 



Born in the United States 693 

Born in Ireland 228 

Born in Canada . . 36 

Born in England 39 

Born in Seotland 8 

Born in New Brunswick 1 

Born in Nova Scotia 1 



Born in Newfoundland. 

Born in Wales 

Born in Sweden 

Born in West Indies. . . 

Born in Austria 

Unknown 



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CITY DOCUMENT. 



CITY OF 




LOWELL. 



Annual Report 

OF THE 

CHIEF ENGINEER 



OF THE 



I^owell ^ife x)epkftii\e:qt, 

, For the year ending March 31, 1876. 



CITY OF LOWELL 



In Board of Aldermen, Dec. 28, 1875. 
Beceived and read, 

SAMUEL A. McPHETKES, City Clerk. 



Times Print. 



REPORT. 

CHIEF'S OFFICE, GOVERNMENT BUILDING, j 
Lowell, Apkil 1, 1876. \ 

To the Honorable Mayor and Board of Aldermen : 

Gentlemen: — Herewith is submitted the Annual Re- 
port of the Chief Engineer of the Fire Department, for the 
year ending March 31st, 1876. 

The Report consists of a register of the Department, 
with number of badge, age, residence, and occupation of 
each member, with an inventory of the apparatus and other 
property in charge of each Company, and an enumeration 
of all property belonging to the Department, owned by the 
city. Also, a list of signal boxes, connected with the fire- 
alarm telegraph, the number of hydrants and reservoirs, 
with their location, together with a full statement of the 
fires and alarms which have occurred during the past year, 
the causes thereof, the loss and insurance as near as could 
be ascertained, and such information and suggestions as are 
thought proper for your consideration. 

The balance of the Appropriation for 1874, undrawn 

January 1, 1875, was .....$ 5,165 15 

Appropriated for 1875 42,000 00 

Received from other sources ..... 3,097 49 

Transferred from Reserved Fund .... 2,000 00 

$52,262 64 



4 REPORT OF THE 

Amount expended, ....... 46,797 09 



Balance undrawn January 1, 1876 . . $ 5,465 55 

The amount received from other sources, was for ser- 
vices of the drivers and horses hauling water pipe, and labor 
otherwise rendered, also for the sale of old materials. 

FIRES AND ALARMS. 

The whole number of alarms given from signal boxes 
from April 1, 1875, to March 31, 1876, has been fifty-four, 
being an increase from last year of twenty-three. In one 
instance two boxes, and in another three boxes were struck 
for the same fire. A box was also struck Oct. 10th, in re- 
sponse to a call for assistance from North Chelmsford, a large 
fire being in progress there, and to which apparatus 
and men were sent as promptly as could be done 
under the circumstances, the horses all suffering from 
the epidemic prevailing at that time. At twenty-eight of 
the alarms, the services of the department were required, 
the remainder were given for slight causes, in some in- 
stances being quite needless. In addition to the signal 
box alarms, we had several still alarms, at one of which on 
the Lowell Corporation the loss was reported to be three 
thousand dollars. The whole amount of loss as near as could 
be ascertained is $44,715, upon which there has been paid 
insurance to the amount of $39,835, making loss above in- 
surance, $4,880. 

Elsewhere will be found a tabular statement to which 
you are referred for details of each fire. 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 5 

APPARATUS. 

The apparatus consists of three steam fire engines, 
eight hose carriages, one of them being drawn by a horse, 
and the rest by hand, and two hook and ladder trucks run 
by one company, in service. Also in reserve, one steam fire 
engine, two hand hose carriages used for relief purposes, 
also a small two-wheeled hose jumper which has 250 feet of 
hose on it, being located on Lincoln Street, also a two-wheeled 
horse hose carriage, which is kept at the Warren Street 
House, being loaded at this time with 400 feet of hose. 
The steamer and the hand engine should be disposed of as 
they need extensive repairs, and are depreciating in value. 
The horse hose carriage attached to steamer No. 3, also the 
hook and ladder carriage respond to every alarm. Asa general 
rule the Department respond to half the boxes on a first alarm, 
the running card being so arranged that each box calls on 
an average less than half of the Department. There are 
eight hose reels on runners for which we have had no use this 
past winter ; when there is sleighing, they add very much 
to the efficiency of the department. The stop nozzles with 
which each company have been supplied for a year or more, 
have proved to be a great acquisition, preventing damage 
by water, and effectually controling the stream at the pipe 
instead of the hydrant. We have 15,000 feet of 2 1-2 inch 
leather and linen rubber lined hose, also 500 feet of 2 1 4 
leather which is not reliable. Four hundred of the latter size 
was disposed of during the past year, being quite worn out. 
Repairs are needed on one of the steamers also on hose car- 
riage No. 2 ; and the hook and ladder carriage should be 



6 REPORT OF THE 

placed on platform springs so that a pole could be used in- 
stead of shafts, in order that two horses might be used to' 
draw it, instead of one as at present, the load being too much 
for one horse, especially when it is taken beyond the pave- 
ments. 

In the month of December last, steamer No. 1, was 
transferred from the Middle Street Engine House to the 
new house on Gorham Street, by which change another 
wagon is needed, for the purpose of exercising the horses, 
and in procuring such a wagon it should be so adapted, that 
it might be used by a salvage corps, which could be added to 
the Department without much additional expense, the re- 
quisite number of men being deducted or transferred from 
the hook and ladder company which could bear the reduc- 
tion. An organization formed for the purpose of using the 
small means in the shape of Extinguishers and Johnson 
Pumps, in localities where steamers could not operate, or in 
the early stages of a fire, where prompt application of a 
small quantity of water is of vital importance, and again to 
be equally ready to protect property from damage by water, 
or from needless destruction, or from loss by thieves or 
otherwise, could not fail to win its way to public favor. 
Such organizations now exist in the large cities, being main- 
tained by the insurance companies, acting in conjunction and 
harmony with the Fire Department, and there is no ques- 
tion in regard to their usefulness. Also in cities of our size, 
they are being organized, the expense being borne jointly by 
the Board of Underwriters and the Municipal Authorities. 
The object of the formation of the Fire Department being 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 7 

the preservation of property from destruction by fire, why 
not so adapt its means to the end in view that it may be 
prepared to save property from all the consequences of fire. 
The horses attached to steamer No. 2, should be exchanged 
for another pair, better fitted to do the work they may be 
called upon to perform. The houses occupied by the 
Department in some instances need repairs, as a whole 
being in good condition, The Gorham Street House was 
finished in November last, and taken possession of by the 
Department in December following, its cost including bell 
and striker being about $11,000, not including the land. 

FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

The telegraph continues to be a valuable auxiliary 
and although there has been some eccentricity in its work- 
ings, there has been no delay or loss in consequence. An 
additional box, No. 27, located in Pawtucketville and a 
mile of wire have been put up the past year. Every addi- 
tion thus made involves an increase in the power of the bat- 
tery, which should be enlarged by substituting larger sized 
jars for those now in use, thus making the battery more 
enduring, and as experiment proves using less material for 
the same results. 

WATER. 

The whole number of hydrants is now 571, being an 
increase from last year of 37; 42 new hydrants have been 
added, and five old ones have been taken out. 

Extensions of water pipe have been made on public 
and private streets to the amount of 25,000 feet, and as a 
general rule hydrants are put in each three hundred feet. 



8 REPORT OF THE 

The Fire Department is charged $20 per annum for each 
hydrant, which amount is placed to the credit of the Water 
Works. The hydrants have been in good condition during 
the past winter, much better than the winter previous. 

An important change was made on Kirk Street, where 
the four inch pipe was taken up, and a six inch pipe con- 
necting the twenty inch pipe on French Street, with the 
twelve inch pipe on Merrimack was put in its place. Also 
on Middlesex Street, an old hydrant was taken out and a 
new one substituted, in connection with the Jackson street 
extension. An order was passed by the City Council last 
year transferring the hydrants on the old line of water pipe 
to the water board, to be by them kept in repair, which had 
been done previously by the Fire Department. 

MANUAL FORCE. 

The Department consists of a Chief Engineer, and four 
Assistant Engineers, three Steamer Companies of thirteen 
men each ; five Hose Companies of twelve men each ; and 
one Hook and Ladder Company of twenty-nine men includ- 
ing the driver. 

The Chief, and the drivers, five in number, are perma- 
nently employed, and in addition to fire duty, perform such 
other labor as may be required. At the present time the 
Ordinances are being revised, and such as relate to the Fire 
Department should be made to conform to the different con- 
dition of affairs, now existing to what they were when we 
had hand engines and no water works. 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 9 

In conclusion I return thanks to all officials with whom 
I have had business intercourse, and from whom I have re- 
ceived many favors, also to the Department for its prompt- 
ness and efficiency, 

Respectfully, 

GEORGE HOBSON, 

Chief Engineer, 



10 



REPORT OF THE 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 

MARCH, 1876. 



CHIEF ENGINEER, 
GEORGE HOBSON, Aged 50. 

Residence, 24 Linden Street, Office, City Govenrment Building. 

ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 



o 

tao 
-a 
■a 
M 


Name. 


Age. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


A 


Charles H. Arlen, 


48 


Gas Fitter, 


Perrin Street. 


B 


Samuel W. Taylor, 


46 


Carpenter, 


172 Merrimack Street 


C 


* Hiram N. Hall, 


47 


Clerk, 


Elliott Street. 


D 


Edward S. Hosmer, 


38 


Butcher, 


Livermore Street. 



*Secretary to Board of Engineers. 

FOREMEN OF COMPANIES. 



be 

(3 


Name. 


Age. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


39 


Josiah W. White, 


26 


Merchant, 


78 Chapel Street. 


49 


Ruel F. Britton, 


28 


Grocer, 


Engine House. 


61 


J. H. Stackpole, 


34 


Manufacturer, 


27 Stackpole Street. 


71 


Samuel G. Cooper, 


30 


Block Cutter, 


172 Hale Street. 


81 


Geo. T. Anthony, 


34 


Carpenter, 


32 Tilden Street. 


94 


James F. Norton, 


36 


Gas Fitter, 


97 High Street. 


105 


William King, 


34 


Boot Maker, 


56 Fayette Street. 


117 


James Armstrong, 


32 


Trader, 


W. Fifth Street. 


11 


J. P. Pearson, 


37 


Carpenter, 


Appleton Street. 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 11 

HOPE STEAM FIKE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 1. 

13 MEMBERS. HOUSE ON GORHAM STREET. 



6 
to 


Position. 


Name. 


<6 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


1 
4 
7 


Engineer. 
Ass't Engineer, 
Driver, 


Locke, J. J. 
Ki'lley, E. C. 
Teel, George 


44 
25 
31 


Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Driver S. F. E. 


29 Chapel. Street. 
Engine House. 
Engine House. 



HOSE CARRIAGE DRAWN BY HAND. 



39 


Foreman, 


White, J. W. 


26 


Merchant, 


78 Chapel Street. 


40 


Ass't Foreman, 


Stone, W. F. 


30 


Machinist, 


Engine House. 


41 


Clerk, 


Jockow, J. C. 


39 


Blacksmith, 


81 Agavvam Street. 


44 




Casey, Joseph 


27 


Mason, 


191 Gorham St. 


45 




Cowell, James, 


29 


Teamster, 


23 Kidder Street. 


43 




Crosby, B. F. 


32 


Mason. 


98 Agawam Street. 


48 




Grady, W H. 


21 


Mason, 


Engine House. 


46 




Lovett, G. W. 


25 


Bleacher, 


Engine House. 


42 




Hustwick, Geo. 


37 


Fireman , 


9 Hudson. Street. 


47 




Winslow, James 


22 


Dyer, 


Engine House . 



Apparatiis and Property owned by the City, in care of this company. 

Steamer built by Union Macbine Co., of Eitchburg, in 1870, has 
two double-acting steam cylinders, 7-g- incb diameter and 8 incb stroke, 
two double-acting pumps, 4| incbes diameter, arranged to work sepa- 
rately, or together, weighs, when loaded, 7575 lbs., has 30 feet suction 
hose, with hydrant couplings ; hose carriage, carrying 500 feet of 
leather hose ; 1 two-way chuck, with reducer ; 1 branch connection ; 
1750 feet of 2| inch leather hose ; 50 feet f- rubber hose ; 1 reducer, 5 
to 2\ inch ; 4 small reducers ; 2 '. hose pipes, with stop and spray noz- 
zles ; 12 spanners ; 6 lanterns ; 2 hydrant wrenches ; 6 ladder ropes 
and straps ; 2 bars; 1 axe ; 1 wrench; 2 buckets ; 1 hose sleigh; 13 
silver badges ; 2 horses ; 1 set double harnesses ; 4 horse blankets ; 2 
hoods ; 2 beds and bedding ; 2 bureaus ; 1 mirror ; 14 cane seat chairs ; 
1 desk ; and all tools necessary for repairs on engine and cleaning 
horses. 



12 



REPORT OF THE 



TORRENT STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 2. 

13 MEMBERS. HOUSE ON MIDDLESEX STREET. 



to 

« 
aq 


Position. 


Name. 


6 
bo 
< 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


2 
5 
8 


Engineer, 
Ass't Engineer, 
Driver, 


Maddocks, George 
Hibbert, C. S. 
Boynton, Henry 


30 
30 
24 


Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Driver, S. F. E. 


Engine House. 
Branch Street. 
Engine House. 







HOSE CARRIAGE 


DRAWN BY HAND. 




49 


Foreman, 


Britton, R. F. 


28 


Grocer, 


Engine House. 


66 


Ass't Foreman, 


Coolidge, M. J. 


24 


Clerk, 


Engine House. 


58 


Clerk. 


Hartford, G. H. 


24 


Bobbin Maker, 


Appleton Street. 


53 




Abbott, J. W. 


26 


Carpenter, 


Middlesex Street. 


50 




Carter, Stanley, 


30 


Machinist, 


Middlesex Street, 


51 




Fitzgerald, J. 


23 


Moulder, 


Middlesex Street. 


54 




Foss, Frank, 


25 


Grocer, 


Middlesex Street, 


C5 




Hill, Joseph, 


25 


Piper, 


Gorham Street, 


57 




Laflam, Charles, 


23 


Box Maker, 


Middlesex Street, 


52 




Stearns, A. C. 


34 


Cabinet Maker, 


Engine House. 



Apparatus and Property owned by the City, in care of this Company. 
Steamer built by Hunneman & Co., in 1868, similar to engines 1 
and 3, weight when loaded, 7720 pounds ; it has 30 feet suction hose 
with hydrant couplings ; hose carriage carrying 500 feet of 2 1-2 inch 
leather hose ; 1 hose sleigh ; 1200 feet 2 1-2 inch leather hose ; 500 
feet 2 1-2 inch linen rubber lined hose ; 1 two-way chuck with reducer ; 
1 branch connection; 3 hose pipes, one with stop and spray nozzle ; 
14 spanners ; 8 ladder straps ; 2 hydrant wrenches ; 1 large reducer 
5 to 2 1-4 inches ; 1 axe ; 1 small bar ; 1 copper goose neck ; 4 reducing 
couplings ; 1 jack screw ; 2 pair lead bars ; 6 coal boxes ; 1 pair 
horses ; two pair harnesses ; 1 pair halter bridles ; 1 fuel wagon ; 1 
wagon jack; 1 pair traverse runners; 4 blankets; 2 hoods ; 4 arm 
chairs ; 14 cane-seat chairs ; 1 Mead stove ; 1 copper boiler ; 2 mirrors ; 
1 bureau ; 3 beds and bedding ; 1 map of the city ; 13 silver badges ; 
1 fire alarm gong and all tools necessary for cleaning horses, repair- 
ing engine, and for hydrant work. 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



13 



WAMESIT STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 3. 

13 MEMBERS. HOUSE ON MIDDLE STREET. 



■60 

CS 


Position. 


Name. 


6 

< 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


3 
6 
9 


Engineer, 
Ass't Engineer, 
Driver , 


Brown, E. L. 
Merchant, J. G. 
Whitney, G. B. 


37 

38 
29 


Machinist, 
Engineer, 
Driver, S. F. E. 


42 Merrimack Corp 
31 Rock Street. 
Engine House. 







HOSE CARRIAGE 


DliAWN BY HORSE. 




61 


Foreman, 


Stack pole, J. H. 


34 


Manufacturer, 


27StackpoleSt. 


62 


Ass't Foreman, 


Smith, A. B. 


25 


Machinist, 


1 Macli. Shop Corp 


63 


Clerk, 


Hoyt, Frank 


27 


Cigar Maker, 


Engine House. 


59 


Driver, 


Lord, C. A. 


31 


Driver, 


Engine House. 


63 




Adams, James 


26 


Carpenter, 


106 Middlesex St. 


67 




Bowden, Frank 


24 


Manufacturer, 


30 Chestnut St. 


66 




Foster, H. J. 


25 


Carpenter, 


17 La Grange St. 


65 




Hilliard, D. W. 


25 


Carpenter, 


33 Mass. Corp. 


60 




Little, E. J. 


28 


Machining t, 


83 Prince Street, 


64 




Roark, Frank 


26 


Manufacturer, 


82 Middle Sreet. 



Apparatus and Property owned by the City, in care of this Company. 
Steamer built by Hunneman & Co., in 1866, similar to 1 and 2, 
weigbt wben loaded 7650 pounds, has 30 feet suction hose, with 
hydrant couplings; 1 horse hose carriage with shafts and pole, carry- 
ing 800 feet 2 1-2 inch leather hose ; 1 hose sleigh with shafts ; 
1750 feet 2 1-2 inch leather hose ; 1 two-way chuck, with reducer ; 
12 spanners ; 2 reducers; 2 axes ; 2 pipes; 1 stop nozzle ; 2 iron bars ; 
3 ladder straps ; 2 branch connections ; 1 hydrant wrench ; 7 hat 
fronts ; 1 bucket ; 6 lanterns ; 3 mirrors ; 2 bureaus ; 4 beds and 
bedding; 1 map of the city ; 3 horses ; 2 pairs double harnesses ; 2 
single harnesses ; 6 horse blankets ; 3 hoods ; 1 large stove ; 1 copper 
boiler; 1 clock; 50 feet f inch rubber hose and pipe; 1 four- way 
chuck ; 1 hose rope ; 1 pair lead bars ; 1 large gong ; all tools necessary 
for repairs on engine and cleaning horses ; 1 fuel wagon ; 1 small 
wagon ; 1 traverse-runner sleigh ; 2 whiffle-trees ; also tools for working 
on hydrants and for general purposes. 



KEPORT OF THE 



OCEAN HOSE COMPANY, No. 1. 

12 MEMBERS. HOUSE ON" WARREN STREET. 



bp 


Position. 


Name. 


as 
< 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


71 


Foreman, 


Cooper, S. G. 


30 


Block Cutter, 


172 Hale Street. 


76 


Asst Foi eman 


Hunt, William 


23 


Carpenter, 


17 Hurd Street. 


75 


Clerk, 


Lovett, F. E. 


25 


Painter, 


120 Merrimack St. 


80 


Steward, 


Simons, F. W. 


24 


Bill Poster, 


& Lee Street. 


77 




Coulam, Henry 


22 


Manufacturer, 


120 Central Street. 


79- 




Burns, M. J. 


22 


Cabinet Maker, 


8 Mclntire Street. 


70 




Glltnan., W. H. 


23 


Painter, 


Donovan Court. 


69 




Graves, G. A. 


23 


Cabinet Maker, 


16 Suffolk Street. 


74. 




Hanson, J. S. 


38 


Teamster, 


20 Marshall Street. 


72. 




Lane, G. W. 


23 


Spinner, 


120 Merrimack St. 


7& 




Walton, A. C. 


38 


Weaver, 


4S Mass. Corp. 


7a 




Wilkius, F. A. 


34 


Painter, 


41 Wortben Street. 



Apparatus and Property, owned by the City in care of this Company, 
Hose Carriage built by Hunneman & Co., Boston, in 1853, carry- 
ing 750 feet of hose ; 2,000 feet of 2 1-2 inch leather hose ; 6 reducing 
couplings ; 25 feet small leather hose ; 12 spanners ; 6 belts ; 1 two- 
way chuck ; 1 branch connection ; 2 hose pipes, one with patent stop 
nozzle; 1 extra nozzle; 6 ladder straps; 1 hydrant wrench; 1 hose 
sleigh; 1 set of rollers for hose sleigh; 4 lanterns ; 2 stoves; 2 coal 
hods; 2 shovels; 2 brooms; 1 hand brush ; L coal sifter; 1 carriage 
jack; 4 spittoons; 1 watering pot; 12 silver badges; 6 hat fronts ; 1 
headlight; 1 feather duster; 1 mirror; 1 copper boiler ; 2 buckets ; 
2 wash basins : 2 pails ; 1 hoe ; 2 axes ; 20 chairs ; 1 settee ; 1 whiffle- 
tree ; 1 fire alarm gong ; 1 map of the city of Lowell. 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPAREMENT. 



15 



MECHANICS HOSE COMPANY, NO. % 

12 MEMBERS. HOUSE ON CROSS STREET, 





Position. 


Name. 


■Si 
< 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


81 


Foreman, 


Anthony. Geo. T. 


34 


Carpenter. 


32 Tilden Street. 


82 


Ass't "Foreman 


Pierce, J. A. 


27 


Door Maker, 


14 Franklin Street. 


86 


Clerk and { 
Steward, j 


DougQass, E. W. 


22 


Painter, 


180 School Street. 


89 




Draper, A. H. 


27 


Moulder, 


92 Willie Street. 


$2 




Fletcher, E. W. 


22 


Moulder-, 


92 Willie Street. 


91 




Graham, W. W. 


22 


Butcher, 


7 Wiggin Street. 


88 




Green, Charles D. 


90 


Carpenter, 


90 Willie Street. 


83 




Harrington, H. E. 


28 


Painter, 


9 Clark Street. 


84 




Maxfleld, John H. 


22 


Wood Turner, 


4 LaGrange Court. 


85 




Osgood, 3" red W. 


27 


Machinist, 


30 Grove Street. 


■90 




Tucker, John H. 


23 


Moulder, 


332 Middlesex SU 


87 




Wade, Snell O. 


23 


Stone Cutter, 


24 Pen in Street. 



. Apparatus and Property owned by the City in care of this Company. 
Hose carriage built in 1869, carrying 750 feet of hose ; 1600 feet 
of 2\ inch hose ; 1 hose sleigh ; 5 arm chairs ; 12 cane seat chairs ; 4 
reducing couplings ; 2 hose pipes ; 1 with patent stop nozzle ; 75 feet 
% inch rubber hose and pipe ; 1 carriage jack; 1 branch connection ; 
12 spanners ; 6 spanner belts ; 12 hat fronts ; 12 silver badges ; 1 two- 
way chuck with reducer ; 7 lanterns ; 7 ladder straps ; 2 iron bars ; 1 
hydrant wrench ; 1 axe ; 1 mirror ; 2 stoves ; 2 shovels ; 1 fire shovel] 
2 brooms ; 1 wash disb ; 4 spittoons ; 2 water pails ; 1 window brush ; 
1 monkey wrench , 2 buckets ; 2 hand brushes ; 1 feather duster ; 1 
desk ; L coal hod ; 2 ladders ; 2 settees ; 1 mop ; 1 whiffle-tree ; 1 floor 
brush; 1 fire alarm gong; 1 map of the city of Lowell. 



16 



REPORT OF THE 
EXCELSIOE HOSE COMPANY, No. 3. 

12 MEMBERS. HOUSE ON CENTRAL STREET. 



E9 


Position. 


Name. 


< 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


94 


Foreman, 


Norton, James F. 


36 


Gas /itter, 


97 High Street. 


95 


Ass't Foreman 


Meloy, W. H. 


31 


Blacksmith, 


4a Summer Street. 


97 


Clerk and j 
Steward, ) 


Coughlin, J. E. 


25 


Plasterer, 


262 Central Street. 


194 




Allen, Thomas 


24 


Machinist, 


65 Appleton Street. 


99 




Barris, James 


28 


Blacksmith, 


45 London Street. 


103 




Barris, Robert 


23 


Carriage Trimmer, 


172 Central Street. 


100 




Cunningham, Edw. 


28 


Gas Fitter, 


29 Church Street. 


102 




Curtin, Patrick, 


23 


Moulder, 


31 Watson Street. 


98 




Mack, Joseph 


27 


Gas Fitter, 


13 Church Street. 


101 




McLaughlin, John 


23 


Blacksmith, 


72 Moody Street. 


93 




Meloy, John 


22 


Gas Fitter, 


45 Summer Street. 


96 




Shephard, .Abraham 


35 




15 Hudson Strec t. 



Apparatus and Property owned by the City, in care of this Company. 
One Hose Carriage built in 1869, carrying 750 feet of hose ; one 
hose sleigh ; 1600 feet of 2\ inch leather hose ; 2 hose pipes ; one with 
patent stop nozzle ; 3 hand lanterns ; 1 axe j 1 two-way chuck and re- 
ducer ; 1 hydrant wrench ; 1 pail ; 4 reducing couplings ; 1 iron bar ; 
5 spanners ; 4 ladder straps ; 1 ladder rope ; 1 monkey wrench ; 6 hat 
fronts ; 13 cane seat chairs ; 2 settees ; 4 iron spittoons ; 1 stove and 
tunnel ; 1 copper boiler ; 1 mirror ; 1 step ladder ; 1 shovel ; 1 wooden 
shovel ; 1 small shovel ; 1 coal hod ; 1 coal sifter ; 1 carriage jack ; 1 
whiffle-tree : 25 feet f inch rubber hose, with pipe ; 1 two horse pole ; 
12 silver badges ; 1 ash can ; 1 eight day clock ; 7 chairs ; 1 fire 
alarm gong. 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 17 

MAZEPPA HOSE COMPANY, No. 4, 

12 MEMBERS. HOUSE ON FAYETTE STREET. 



n 


Position. 


Name. 


<5 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


105 


Foreman, 


King, William 


34 


Boot Maker, 


56 Fayette Street. 


106 


Ass't Foreman 


Ilalstead. W. H. 


32 


Wool Sorter, 


2 High Street Square 


107 


Clerk, 


Meredith, Edward 


35 


Painter, 


54 Fayette Street. 


111 


Steward, 


Harrington, Jere 


26 


Wire Worker, 


17 Chesnut Street. 


114 




Halstead, J. W. 


27 


Wool Sorter, 


13 Alder Street. 


109 


/ 


Hussey, Geo. R. 


45 


Carder, 


37 Pond Street. 


108 


Morse, Charles 


35 


Finisher, 


59 Howe Street. 


110 


/ 


Morse, Charles J." 


26 


Oil Finisher, 


24 Pleasant Street. 


115 




Meloy, Edward 


30 


Gas Fitter, 


40 fayette Street. 


112 




O'Brien, Richard 


25 


Mason, 


29 E. Merrimack St. 


113 




Quinlan, John J. 


24 


Machinist, 


6 Fayette Street. 


116 




W3 man George 


25 


Mason, 


41 Fayette Street. 



Apparatus and Property owned by the City, in care of this Company. 

Hose Carriage built by J. J. Wright & Co., of this city in 

1871, carrying 750 feet of hose ; 1550 feet of 2 1-2 inch leather hose ; 

1 two-way chuck ; 1 hydrant wrench ; 3 hose pipes, 2 of them patent 
nozzles ; 30 feet £ inch rubber hose and pipe ; 12 silver badges ; 12 
hat fronts ; 12 spanners ; 1 branch connection ; 4 reducing couplings ; 

2 bars ; 2 monkey wrenches ; 1 whiffle-tree ; 10 ladder straps ; 5 lan- 
terns ; 1 signal lantern ; 1 carriage jack ; 2 axes ; 9 hose belts ; L 
clock; 1 mirror; 2 stoves; 1 table; 1 step ladder; 1 coffee boiler; 
20 chairs ; 1 settee ; 1 flag ; 1 coal hod ; 1 shovel ; 1 water pail ; 2 
wash-dishes; 1 broom ; 5 spittoons; 1 feather duster; 2 buckets; 1 
fire alarm gong ; 1 map of the City of Lowell. 



18 



REPORT OF THE 



WELLMAN HOSE COMPANY, No. 5. 

12 MEMBERS. HOUSE ON FOURTH STREET. 



o5 
M 


Position. 


Name. 




Occupation. 


Residence. 


117 


Foreman, 


Armstrong, James 


32 


Trader, 


W. Fifth Street. 


122 


Ass't Foreman 


Farrell, T. J. 


25 


Coachman, 


Bridge Street. 


126 


Clerk 


Rogers, Caleb 


42 


Grocer, 


Fifth Street. 


121 


Steward, 


Mansnr, Frank 


26 


Manufacturer, 


Third Street. 


123 




Heald A. W. 


34 


Truckman, 


Albion Street. 


120 




Callahan, Bernard 


28 


Carpenter, 


River Street. 


125 




McFarland, W. H. 


23 


Manufacturer, 


Reed Street. 


124 




McMonagle, John 


23 


Machinist, 


Mass. Corp. 


118 




Merrill, Alphonso 


40 


Truckman, 


Fifth Street. 


119 




Patten G. W. 


23 


Florist, 


Third Street. 


127 




Sanborn, G. W., Jr. 


26 


Manufacturer, 


Myrtle Street. 


128 




Whitney, C. H. 


26 


Truckman, 


Coburn Street. 



Apparatus and Property, oivned by the City in care of this Company 
Hose Carriage formerly used by Steamer Co. No. 3, built in 
1869; carrying 500 feet of hose; 1 hose sleigh; 1500 feet of 2 1-2 
inch leather hose ; 1 two-way chuck, with reducer ; 1 hose pipe with 
stop and spray nozzle ; 1 hose pipe with common nozzle; 2 reducers; 
1 bar ; 12 spanners ; 7 ladder straps and ropes ; 1 thirty foot rope tor hose 
purposes ; 1 bucket on hose carriage ; 2 brass lanterns ; 2 tin lanterns 

1 stove ; 2 settees ; 12 cane seat chairs ; 6 wooden chairs ; 1 hal^ table 

2 brooms ; 4 iron spittoons; 1 small iron shovel ; 1 large iron .shovel 
1 wooden shovel ; 1 coal hod ; 1 wooden pail ; 25 feet f rubber hose 
and pipe; 1 coal sifter; 12 silver badges ; 1 fire alarm gong; 1 thirty- 
three foot laddder. 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



19 



FRANKLIN HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, 

29 MEMBERS. HOUSE ON MIDDLE STREET. 



11 

12 
13 
10 
29 
24 
33 
15 
35 
,'28 
20 
25 
23 
36 
26 
IS 
22 
31 
37 
32 
30 
21 
38 
16 
14 
34 
17 
19 
27 



Position. 



Foreman, 
Ass't Foreman, 
Clerk, 
Driver, 



Name. 



Pearson, J. P. 
Downs, H. B. 
Lovejoy, Edwin 
Peabody, W. L. 
Beaman, J. C. 
Bishop, Nathaniel 
Bishop, William 
Clark, Ezra 
Daggett, H. C. 
Flagg, J. L. 
Fuller, F. E. 
Gardner, H. S. 
Gilbert, A. H. 
Gilbert, O. J. 
Healey, J. C. 
Hemmenway, C. F. 
Hubbard, C. F. 
Jones, J. C. 
Joyce, J. H. 
Norman, Rufus 
Pickman, David 
Pullen, J. A. 
Roberts, William 
Reed H. M. 
Simmons, W. H. 
Stockwell, William 
Thompson, Alvin 
Warren, O. E. 
Whitney, Joseph 



37 
41 
46 
23 
25 
38 
29 
49 
50 
40 
27 
24 
26 
27 
46 
26 
46 
33 
34 
49 
52 



Occupation. 



Carpenter, 

Carpenter, 

Trader, 

Oliver, 

Moulder, 

Spinner, 

Weaver, 

Manufacturer, 

Carpenter, 

Carpenter, 

Carpenter, 

Moulder, 

Moulder, 

Clerk, 

Pattern Maker, 

Carpenter, 

Teamster, 

Carpenter, 

Moulder, 

Carpenter, 

Machinist, 

Machinist, 

Teamster, 

Carpenter, 

Moulder, 

Painter, 

Blacksmith, 

Manufacturer, 

Machinist, 



Residence. 



Appleton Street. 
Bowditch Streets 
Dover Street. 
Engine House. 
Howard Street. 
French Street. 
Warren Street. 
Worthen Street, 
Bridge Street. 
Jackson Street. 
Bowditch Street. 
Worthen Street. 
Central Street. 
Elm Street. 
173 Merrimack Corp 
Water Street. 
14 Lowell Corp. 
Fifth Street. 
Butterfield Street.- 
Colbum Street. 
Oak Street. 

Colburn> Street. 

Coburn Street. 

Franklin Street. 

Howard Street. 

High Street. 

Dodge Street, 

Worthern Street, 

Mason's Court. 



Apparatus and Property oivned by the City in care of this Company. 

Two Hook and Ladder Trucks, carrying the following apparatus ; 

20 ladders of the following lengths ; 2 hutt ladders, 33 feet each ; 2 tip 

ladders, 30 feet each; by joining the tipps and butts together, ladders 



20 REPORT OF THE 

5G feet can be raised ; 5 ladders, 33 feet each ; 2 ladders, 16 feet each ; 
4 roof ladders ; 12 feet each ; 1 ladder, 27 feet; 3 ladders, 22 feet 
each ; 1 ladder, 10 feet, iron shod ; 16 props ; 14 hooks ;■ 7 pitchforks ; 
6 rakes ; 6 axes ; 2 sledges ; 1 wrench ; 1 bar ; 8 lanterns ; 4 guy 
ropes, 80 feet each ; 3 small hand pumps for fire purposes ; 2 dogs for 
securing ladders ; 2 buckets ; 31 cane seat chairs ; 4 wooden chairs ; 1 
mirror ; 1 stove ; 1 copper boiler ; 1 clock ; 1 broom ; 1 dust pan ; 1 
brush ; 1 feather duster ; 1 table ; 1 coal sifter ; 1 mop ; 1 scrubbing 
brush ; 2 coal hods ; 1 pail ; 2 watering pots ; 25 feet f rubber hose, 
with patent pipe ; 3 fir 3 extinguishers, (Steiner), 1 gallon oil can ; 3 
spare hooks and ferrules ; 1 horse ; 2 horse blankets ; 1 hood ; 1 har- 
ness ; all tools necessary for cleaning horse. 



ADDITIONAL FIRE APPARATUS. 



EELIEF STEAM FIRE ENGINE, No. 4, 

House on Warren Street. 

No members attached; in care of Steward of Hose Co., No. 1. 
On the rotary principle, 12 inch engine, 6 inch pump, weight when 
loaded, 8300 lbs., 30 feet suction hose, with hydrant couplings. 



ONE TWO WHEELED HOESE HOSE CARRIAGE, 

Kept in House on Warren Street. 

Has 400 feet 2-J inch hose, on reel ; capacity of reel, 800 feet ; only 
used in case of emergency ; also 200 feet of 24; inch hose not reliable. 



TWO HAND HOSE CARRIAGES. 

Used for Relief Purposes. 
Kept at Hearse House on Broadway. 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 21 

DOCKET ENGINE, No. 2. 

House on Lincoln Street, Ayer's City. 

Hand Engine, 5|- inch cylinder, 16 inch stroke, 20 feet suction 
hose ; hose tender with 250 feet of 2\ inch hose on reel ; also connec- 
tions and goosenecks for new hydrants. 



OTHER PROPERTY BELONGING TO THE 

DEPARTMENT, 

In Charge of the Chief Engineer. 

200 feet 2|- inch hose attached to hydrant on the Prescott Corpo- 
ration, 1 truck, (new) for hauling pipe, 2 copper goosenecks, 
and other tools for working on hydrants, 1 ten gallon oil can, 1 
pump for hydrant boxes, 1 set dies for department badge, 7 fire buck- 
ets, 1 set marking irons, 10 hydrant reducers, extra hydrant wrenches, 
ladder ropes, spanners, 1 silver prize trumpet, 1000 feet of new hose, 
200 feet of 2 J inch ordinary hose. 



RECAPITULATION. 

One Chief Engineer, 4 Assistant Engineers, 128 Eiremen, 4 
Steam Eire Engines, 2 Hook and Ladder Carriages, fully equipped, 9 
Hand Hose Carriages, 1 Horse Hose Carriage, four wheeled, 1 Horse 
Hose Carriage, two wheeled, 1 Hand Engine with Hose Tender, 7 
Hand Hose Sleighs, 1 Horse Hose Sleigh, 3 Hand Extinguishers, 
15,000 feet 2| inch Hose, 500 feet 2\ Hose, 120 feet of Suction Hose, 
350 feet of f inch Rubber Hose, 9 small f Hose Pipes, 8 Horses, 2 
Fuel Wagons and 1 set heavy Traverse Runners, 1 Light Wagon, 1 
Traverse Runner Sleigh, 5 sets Double Harnesses, 2 Single Harnesses, 
134 Silver Badges, 40 Hat Eronts, 15 Axes, 30 Reducing Couplings, 
7 Large Reducers, 5x2{ inches, 20 Hose Pipes, 8 Two-way Chucks, 
1 Four-way Chuck, 9 Two-way Branch Connections, 7 Spray Nozzles, 



22 . REPORT OF THE 

9 Stop Nozzles, 6 Copper Boilers, 5 Jack Screws, 1 Ladder for Telegraph) 
Repairs, 9 Bedsteads and Bedding for the same, 200 Chairs, 12 Settees,. 

10 Mirrors, 13 Stoves, 10 tables, 5 Bureaus, 15 Horse Blankets, & 
Hoods, 6 Maps of City, 3 Copper Goose Necks, with tools for taking 
care of Hydrants, including GO Boxes for Covering Hydrants in the- 
winter season. 

Each Company is supplied with Wrenches, Shovels, Spanners 
Lanterns,, Crowbars, and all tools necessary for performing their 
duties. 

Implements, suitable for keeping the Telegraph in working order 
also supplies for the Department are kept at the Telegraph Booms 
Middle Street, in charge ©f the operator. 

LOCATION OF ADDITIONAL LADDERS. 

Two at Hose House on Cross Street. 

One " Hose House on Fourth Street. 

One " Butler's Mill, Gorham Street. 

Ome " Steamer Two House,. Middlesex Street*. 



•CTIIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 23 

FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

AUTOMATIC REPEATER WITH BATTERY. 

Operator, George B. Whitney. 
Battery, - Steamer House, Middle Street* 

Number of Miles Wire, ------- 17 

u Signal Boxes, - - - - - - . 35 

" Small Gongs, ------- 7 

u Large Gongs, - - - - - -- 2 

" Striker.', ---------- 7 

One small gong is in the Chief's house, one in the house of First 
Assistant Engineer, and one in each of the houses of the Hose Com- 
panies. The large gongs are in the steamer houses on Middle and 
Middlesex Streets. 

The strikers are located as follows : Alarm hell, Armory Building 
Market Street ; St. Mary's Church, Suffolk Street; Franklin School 
House, Middlesex Street ; Court House, Chapel Hill ; High Street 
Church, Belvidere ; Varnum School House, Centralville ; New Engine 
House, Gorhatn Street. 

The standard time is struck at 1 o'clock, P. M., each day, by J. 
Raynes & Co., from their jewelry store, No. 43 Central Street. 
One stroke dismisses, two call" out the entire department. 
Two strokes repeated once, between eleven and twelve o'clock A 
M. on stormy days notify the teachers of the Public Schools that there 
will be no afternoon session. 



24 



KEPORT OF THE 



TABLE 

of Signal Boxes and Companies responding to Alarms, 



LOCATION. 



6 
7 
8 
9 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
21 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
HI 
32 
34 
35 
36 
41 
42 
43 
46 
51 
52 
53 
61 
62 
63 
64 



Br'dw'y, cor. Mt. Vernon, Csrey & Harris' shop. 

Dntton St., building opp. Parker & Cheney's. 

Rock, cor. Fletcher St., Liberty Square. 

Little, cor. Lewi* Street, Mann School House. 

Market, cor Dutton St., Plunkett's Store. 

.Wcstford, cor. School Street, on pole. 

Salem, cor. Common Street, on pole. 

Market Street, Police Station. 

Prescott Street, cor. Merrimack, Stevens' block. 

Fayette, cor. Andover Street, brick block. 

Bleachery Street, Bleachery stable. 

Hosford Square, on pole. 

Middlesex, cor. Walker Street, on pole. 

Kirk, cor. Merrimack Street, Welles block. 

Coburn, cor. River Street, on pole. 

South Street, Ward Room. 

Merrimack Street, T rem out House. 

Fletcher, cor. Pawtucket Street, on pole. 

Pawtucketville, on pole. 

High, cor. E. Merrimack, on pole. 

Bridge, co*\ Tenth Street, on pole. 

Lincoln Street, Cook's Tannery. 

Charles, cor. Lawrence Street, on pole. 

Poor Farm, on pole. 

Wyman, cor. Nestnith Street, on pole. 

Middlesex Street, Steamer No. 2's House. 

Highland Street, Edson School House. 

Bridge Street, Central Bridge, 

Davis' Corner, on Pole. 

Austin, cor. of Moody Street, on pole. 

Tower's Corner, on pole. 

Lawrence, cor. of Agawam Street, on pole. 

Bowers, cor. of School Street, on pole. 

Hale, cor. Howard Street, on pole. 

Third, cor. Myrtle Street, on pole. 



H 

& L 


Steamers. 


j Hose Co's. 




2 


3 


1 


2 












2 


3 


1 


2 


3 










2 


3 




2 


3 










2 II 


3h 
3ii 


1 


2 

2 




4 






1 


2 

2 


3h 
3h 
3h 
3h 
3h 


] 
1 
1 


2 
2 




4 
4 
4 


5 
5 




1 




3h 


1 




3 








1 


2 


3h 
3h 
3h 
3 


1 
1 


2 


3 


4 

4 


5 




1 


2h 

2 
2 


3h 

3h 

3h 

3 

3 

3 


1 

1 
1 
1 


2 
2 


3 


4 

4 

4 


5 

5 




1 


2u 


3h 
3h 


1 




3 
3 


4 






I 


2 
2h 


3h 

3 

3h 


1 


2 
2 


3 
3 
3 


4 






1 


2 II 


3h 
3 






3 


4 


f> 




1 




3h 

3 

3h 


1 
1 
1 


2 


3 
3 


4 






1 


2 


3h 
3 


1 


o 


3 


4 






1 


2 


3h 
3 




2 


3 


4 


5 



Numbers marked H, Hose Carriages only respond. 



CHIEF ENGLNEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



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'CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



27 



TABLE 

showing the number of fires that occurred on each day of the week m 
each month, from April 1st, 1875, to March 31st, 1876. 



Day of Week. 


Jan 


Feb 


Mar 


Apr 


May 


J use 


Julv 


Aug Sept 


Oct 


Nov 


Dec 


Total. 


."Sunday, 


1 


1 






2 










1 




1 


6 


Monday, 






1 








1 


1 




1 


t 




5 


'Tuesday, 


» 




( 


a 




1 






1 




3 


1 


8 


Wednesday, 




! 




l 1 


4 


1 


I 




il 




I 


2 


12 


Thursday, 


2 




1 


i 


1 




1 




; 


I 


I 


2 


10 


Friday, 


I 




1 






1 


i ! 




• 






2 


6 


Saturday, 


1 




1 


i 


< 




i 


1 






6 


1 


6 


Total. 


6 


2 


4 


4 


7 


3 


5 , 


2 


2 


3 


» 



RESERVOIRS, 

1 on Tyler, corner of George Street. 

1 on Chestnut, corner of Willow Street, 

1 on Salem, ac intersection of Willie Avenue. 

1 on Gross, between Fletcher and Willie Streets, 

1 on Central Street, at Hosford Square. 

1 on' Myrtle, at head of Fifth Street. 

1 on Union, corner of Chapel Street. 

1 on Westford, corner of Grand Street, 

1 on Fourth, near Read Street 

1 on Chapel, corner of Keene Street 

1 on Varney, near Mt. Vernon Street. 

1 on Branch, corner of Queen Street. 

1 on Middlesex, corner of Wilder Street. 

1 on Bridge, corner of Seventh Street. 

1 on Howard, corner of Hale Street. 

1 on Forrest Street. 

2 Openings in Canal on Moody Street. 



2$ 



KEFOKT OF THE 



HYDRANTS BY STREETS. 





JS 


js 






,s 


_c- 






s 


s 




• 


3 


3: 




Location, 


ft 


ft 




LOCATIONS 


■ R 


-ft. 






!> 








> 








P- 


r a 








"» 






o> 




o 




o 









& 


O 


ft 




/<; 


O 


CU 


Abbott Streee, 


1 


Dutton Street,. 


4 


1 




Adams Street, 




6- 


4 


Eleventh Street, 


1 






Agawanrv Street,. 


4 






Kim Street, 


3 






Aiken Street, 


I 






East Merrimack Street, 


4 






Ames Street,, 


1 






East Pine Street, 


2 






Amory Street, 


2 






Fairmont Street, 


i S 






Andovor Street,. 


7 






Faulkner Street, 


1 






Anne Street, 


3 






Fayette Street, 


4 






Appleton Street, 


4 






Fenwick Street, 


2 






Arlington Street,, 


I 






Fifth Street, 


2 






Ash Street, 


1 






First Street, 


4 






Bartlett Street, 


2 






Fletcher Street, 


7 






Beach Street, 


1 






Ford Street, 


2 






Bleachery Street,. 


8 






Fourth Street, 


2 






Blossom Street,. 


1 






Franklin Street, 


1 






Bowers Street,. 


1 






French Street, 






4 


Brandt Street, 


© 


3 




Gates Street, 


1 






Bridge Street,. 


8 




3 


George Street, 


1 






Broadway, 


4 


& 




Gorham Street, 


10 




4 


Bntterfielil Street,. 


2 






Grand Street, 


2 






Cabot Street, 


2 


1 


3 


Grove Street, 


2 






Cady Street, 


I 






Hale Street, 


3 






Cambridge Street,. 


1 






Hall Street, 


3 






Canal Street, 


2 






Harrison Street, 


1 






Canton Street, 


I 






High Street, 


5 






Carpet Laree, 


I 






Highland Street, 


2 






Carter Street,. 


2 






Hilclreth Street, 


5 






Cedar Street, 


2 






Howard Street, 


6 






Central Street,. 


7 


13 




Howe Street, 


2 






Chapel Street, 


& 






Hurd Street, 


2 






Charles Street, 


3 






Jackson Street, 


' 7 






Chelmsford Street, 


1 






James Street, 


1 






Chestnut Street, 


2 






John Street, 


1 






Church Street, 


4 






Kidder Street, 


1 






Clark Street, 


1 






Kinsman Street, 


1 






Clay Street, 


2 






Kirk Street, 


3 






City Stable Yard,. 




I 




Lane Street, 


2 






Coburn Street, 


2 






Lawrence Street, 


7 






Common Street, 


4 






Lee Street, 


1 






Conant Street, 


2 






Lewis Street, 


2 






Congress Street, 


2 






Liberty Street, 


5 






Cooledge Street, 


1 






Lincoln Street, 


8 






Coral Street, 


2 






Linden Street, 


3 






Crosby Street, 


3 






Little Street, 


1 






Cross Street, 


6 






Livingston Street, 


1 






Cushing Street, 






6 


London Street, 


3 






Davidson Street, 


9, 






Madison Street, 


1 






Dodge Street, 


1 






Manstir Street, 


1 






Dover Street, 


3 






Market Street, 


7 






Dummer Street, 


1 






Marshall Street, 


2 






Durant Street, 


2 






Mead Street, 


1 







CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



29 



HYDRANTS— Continued. 



LOCATION. 


pq 






LOCATION. 


_a 


a 
5 






55 


T3 

o 


o 
4 




3 


g 




Merrimack Street, 


5 


10 


South Street, 




Methucn Street, 


3 






South Highland Street, 


1 






Middle Street, 


5 


1 




Stackpole Street, 


3 






Middlesex Street, 


11 


13 




Stevens Street, 


3 






Moody Street, 


6 






Suffolk- Street, 


4 






Moore Street, 


6 






Summer Street, 


6 






Mt. Vernon Street, 


3 






Tenth Street, 


3 






Mt. "Washington Street, 


3 






Third Street, 


6 






Myrtle Street, 


3 






Thirteenth Street, 


1 






Nesmith Street, 


8 






Thorndike Street, 


6 






Newhall Street, 


V 






Tilden Street, 


2 






North Street, 


2 






Tremont Street, 


3 






Oak Street, 


1 






Tyler Street, • 


3 






Oliver Street, 


1 






Union Street, 


1 






Paige Street, 


1 






Varney Street, 


3 






Park Street, 


1 






Vernon Street, 


2 






Pawtucket Street, 


10 






Walker Street, 


9 






Pine Street, 


2 






Walnut Street, 


2 






Pleasant Street, 


1 






Wamesit Street, 


2 






Porter Street, 


1 






Wamesit Power Co., 


1 






Prescott Street, 


1 






Wanalancit Street, 


2 






Prince Street, 


1 






Warren Street, 


1 






Private Street, Corp. Line, 


1 






Water Street, 


3 






Prospect Street, 


1 






Watson Street, 


1 






Queen Street, 


1 






Western Avenue, 


2 


1 




Railroad Street, 


2 






Westford Street, 


5 






River Street, 


6 






West Fourth Street, 


2 






Robinson Street, 


1 






West Fifth Street, 


1 






Rock Street, 


2 






' West Sixth Street, 


4 






Salem Street, 


4 






West Union Street, 


1 






School Street, 


& 






Whipple Street, 


1 






Second Street, 


1 






Wilder Street, 


5 






Seventh Street, 


1 






William Street, 


2 






Simpson Street, 


1 






Willie Street, 


2 






Sixth Street, 


4 






Winter Street, 


1 






Smith Street, 


3 






Worthen Street, 


6 






Number of New 


Hydrants, l 


187 


Old 


u 


56 


P 


ost 




i 


- 


28 







Total, 



571 



THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



I<owi<i<i< W^^fi SoSfj® 



CITY OF LOWELL, MASS. 



TO THE CITY COUNCIL 



JAJVUA'Rr 1st, 7876. 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 




LOWELL : 

CITIZEN AND NEWS PRESS, — KNAPP & MOEET, BOOK AND JOB PEINTEES, 

44 Central Street. 
1876. 



In Boakd of Aldermen, January 11, 1876. 

Head and sent to the Common Council. 

SAMUEL A. McPHETRES, 

City Clerk. 



Received and read. 



In Common Council, January 11, 1876. 



DAVID CHASE, 

Clerk. 



"Water Board's Report. 



OFFICE OF THE LOWELL WATER BOARD, \ 

Januaky 1st, 1876. ) 



To the City Council of the City of Lowell: 

Agreeably to an Ordinance passed July 11, 1872, 
" Providing for the care and management of the Lowell 
Water Works," the Water Board respectfully submit this 
their Third Annual Report, for the year 1875. 

On the third day of May the persons elected to the 
Lowell Water Board, viz. Benj. Walker of the Board of 
Aldermen, A. A. Haggett and E. A. Thissell of the Com- 
mon Council, and Geo. Runels and C. H. Latham from 
the citizens at large, met for organization. Geo. Bunels 
was chosen President, and F. E. French was chosen Clerk 
of the Board. 

The Board have found, what is probably patent to all 
of our citizens, that the Water Works have been con- 
stantly growing in favor, and the use of the city water has 
become a prime necessity to a very large share of our 
people. Applications have been very numerous for 
the extension of the pipes into streets not before sup- 
plied with water, and we have deemed it for the true 
interests of the city to respond favorably \o these 



6 REPORT OF THE 

requests when consistent, and generally such extensions 
of the mains have been made whenever an applicant for 
water could be reached by laying one hundred and twen- 
ty-five feet of street pipe, or whenever any proposed 
extension would not exceed that average distance to a 
taker, In some instances the Board have extended the 
mains to takers more remote than the above rule would 
allow, but in such cases the applicant or applicants, of 
assured responsibility, have been required to sign a con- 
tract, in form approved by the City Solicitor, whereby 
such applicants agree, for a period of five years, to pay 
by way of water rates or otherwise, a sum equal to six 
per cent, on the outlay for extensions so made. 

Early in the season applications were made for the 
extension of the water pipes to Pawtucketville, a portion 
of that part of Dracut recently annexed to the city, but 
as the cost of this extension would be quite large, involv- 
ing either the extension of the mains thence from Cen- 
tralville or across Merrimack River, above Pawtucket 
Falls, and principally from the fact that no sufficient 
appropriation was available to meet the outlay, no move- 
ment has been made toward meeting this demand. As a 
protection against fire and for domestic purposes this part 
of the city should be supplied at an early day. 



FILTERING GALLERY. 

The attention of the Board has been specially directed 
to the inadequate supply of water yielded by the filter 
gallery, it amounting to but little more than one-half the 
present consumption, and to the best method of increas- 
ing the supply to meet the present and future wants of 



LOWELL WATER BOARD. 7 

the city. As will be seen by the report of the Engineer 
of the Water Works, published in the Third Annual 
Report of the Water Commissioners, January 1, 1873, the 
filtering gallery was " not intended to be used as the 
principal source of supply, but during times of freshet, 
when the water in the river contains a considerable 
amount of matter in suspension ;" but, as its yield for 
nearly two years after water was introduced into the city 
was ample to meet all legitimate wants, the water was 
wholly drawn from this source, until the consumption of 
water so increased as to render it necessary in September, 
1874, to admit the water from the river through the inlet 
pipe, since which time, except during periods of freshet, 
it has been kept partially open. The yield of the filter 
gallery during the month of August, 1874, when it was 
exhausted by pumping, for thirty-one consecutive days, 
was found to be 939,860 gallons daily, and a similar trial, 
under like conditions, was made from April 20 to May 
10, 1875, for twenty-one consecutive days, when the 
average yield was 959,768 gallons. These and other 
experiments indicate that the yield of the gallery is but 
slightly, if any, changed by the high or low stage of the 
river. 

It should be borne in mind that while the above 
described tests show that the filter gallery is capable, under 
favorable circumstances, of producing a little more than 
900,000 gallons of water daily, yet to obtain that average 
quantity for the year would require the engine to be run 
every day. So taking the days the pump has been run 
for the past year, 274, or seventy -five per cent, of the 
whole number of days, as a basis of calculation, we shall 
find that the average daily product of filtered water drawn 
from the gallery does not exceed 700,000 gallons, while 



8 REPORT OF THE 

the average daily consumption for the year has been 
1,219,225 gallons. Now, as the present consumption of 
water is nearly twice the quantity yielded by the gallery, 
and, as at an early day, no doubt, there will be required 
three times its present yield, the matter of filtration 
becomes a very important question if our people are to 
be supplied with filtered water at all times, as seems to 
be generally expected. An extension of the filter gal- 
lery, equal to the present length, thirteen hundred feet, 
would involve, probably, an expenditure of about one 
hundred thousand dollars, and if it was no poorer in 
water than the present gallery, and we could not expect 
it to be richer, would only yield a supply scarcely more 
than the present consumption, and still the question of a 
future supply would be an open one. 

During the past Summer the Board caused several 
experimental wells or borings to be made, a few hundred 
feet westerly of the westerly terminus of the filter gal- 
lery, with a view of ascertaining the yield of water ; 
these experiments were not sufficiently extended to be 
regarded as reliable data on which to base any definite 
calculation, still, we may say, they were not regarded as 
being rich in water product. It has seemed to the Board 
that, before expending a large amount of money in the 
extension of the filter gallery, with uncertain results, 
it would be wise to attempt to increase the supply 
by constructing, between the river and the present filter 
gallery, near its eastern extremity, either by excavating 
and removing the alluvial deposit, which is a compact 
silt, almost impervious to water, between the gallery and 
the river, as deep as the bottom of the gallery, and, say, 
twenty or more feet wide, and supplying the place of the 
excavated silt with suitable filter material, or, by a more 



LOWELL WATER BOARD, 9 

elaborate filter chamber, supplied from the present inlet 
pipe. An experimental filter, constructed in either of 
these ways, would be inexpensive, as compared with the 
extension of the gallery, and might demonstrate that an 
abundant and reliable supply of filtered water could be 
obtained at a comparatively small outlay. 



NEW PUMPING ENGINE. 

So numerous and important had become the interests 
dependent upon an abundant and sure supply of water 
that, early in the year, the Board deemed it too hazardous 
to depend longer upon a single pumping engine, however 
good and reliable, and, while ours is one of the best in 
the country, still, it is liable, at any time, to be disabled 
by accident, and so a water famine made possible ; 
accordingly, the City Council was requested to make an 
appropriation for a second or relief engine, which was 
readily granted, and the Board, in conjunction with 
the Mayor, investigated the merits of various pumping 
engines by personal examinations, by correspondence and 
by interviews with engine builders, and, after mature 
deliberation, it was unanimously agreed by the Board 
that the interests of the city would be best subserved by 
adopting the Worthington Duplex Pumping Engine, built 
by Henry R. Worthington of New York, and a contract 
was accordingly made with him for an engine of a pump- 
ing capacity of five million gallons in twenty-four hours, 
being the same rated capacity as the present engine. By 
the terms of the contract the builder guarantees a duty 
of sixty-five millions foot pounds for each one hundred 
pounds of coal consumed. The contract price to be paid 



10 REPORT OF THE 

for the engine, set up and in complete working order, 
painted to accord with the present engine, is $34,000, 
including the foundations, which are now being put in by 
the contractor ; and, it is but just to say, that this part 
of the work is being done in an exceedingly satisfactory 
manner. It is expected that the engine will be in posi- 
tion within a few weeks, it having, as we are informed, 
been already shipped from the workshop. The pumping 
capacity of the two engines will be ample for all the 
wants of the city for many years to come. 



CORPORATION PIPES. 

In the year 1874 there was laid a line of twenty-inch 
pipe to supply the Manufacturing Corporations on the 
line of Merrimack River, and, during the past year, an 
eight-inch pipe has been extended through Warren 
street, mainly to supply the Middlesex Mills, and a six- 
teen-inch pipe has been extended through Jackson street, 
from Central to Middlesex street, to supply the Hamilton 
and Appleton Corporations. These several lines of water 
pipe have been laid at the request of the Corporations, 
mainly for fire purposes, to supplement their own water 
system, in case of an extended conflagration ; they are also 
used to a limited extent for domestic purposes, and it is 
hoped that soon the managers of the Corporations, whose 
boarding-houses have not yet been supplied with the city 
water, will early order its introduction. The sixteen- 
inch pipe, as above, laid through Jackson street, secures, 
besides the special purpose named, a reliable supply of 
water to the western portions of the city, in case the 
cement pipe now laid through Middlesex street should fail. 



LOWELL WATER BOARD. 11 

The expense of these special extensions for fire pur- 
poses has been as follows : 

Amount expended in 1874, as per Keport of Water Board 

of one year ago $36,750 

Expended during 1875, as above described 10,600 

Total . . $47,350 

• 
The Board has devoted considerable time to the consid- 
eration of a revision of the rales and regulations for the gov- 
ernment of this important interest, and the result of their 
deliberations will soon be presented to the City Council for 
their consideration, and approval if the proposed changes 
shall be deemed expedient. The water rates are gen- 
erally very satisfactory, but the experience of the past 
has suggested that some slight modification might profit- 
ably be made. With the proposed revision of the rules 
the Board will also propose amended rates for the consid- 
eration of the City Council. 

The following contracts for water pipe and coal have 
been made during the year : 

May 8.— Witb Jesse W. Starr & Son, for 400 tons 4 and 6 inch 
pipe and 11 tons special castings, at $42 per ton of 2240 lbs., delivered 
in Lowell. 

June 24.— With R. D. Wood & Co , for 138J- tons 16 inch pipe, at 
$42 per ton of 2240 lbs. , and 8 tons special castings at 3 cents per 
pound. 

With Wm. E. Livingston, for 400 tons Lehigh coal, at $7.75 per 
ton of 2240 lbs., on cars in Lowell. 

With O. A. Simpson, for teaming 400 tons coal from the railroad to 
the Water Works Coal Sheds, at fifty-five cents per ton of 2240 lbs. 



12 REPORT OF THE 

During the past year claims for land damages for the 

construction of the Water Works have been adjusted, as 
follows : 

February 2. — Estate of Fisher A. Hildretk, land on line of 

pipe conduit $5,000 00 

Interest 1,084 17 

$6,084 17 

March 1. — Bridget Donohoe, land and personal estate, for 

closing Sixth street $200 00 

Abram French, damage to house by blasting 100 00 

Costs of suit , 20 56 

$120 56 

Josiah B. French, land on line of distributing main, (ver- 
dict of jury) $2,437 12 

Interest 77 18 

Costs 277 61 

Interest on costs 8 79 

$2,800 70 

May 3. — Alfred Brown, land on line of brick supply con- 
duit, (verdict of jury) $1,600 00 

Costs 27 64 

Interest 129 06 

$1,756 70 

May 3. — Gardner L. Willard, land damages on line of 

of brick supply conduit, (verdict of jury) $2,250 00 

Costs 40 07 

Interest 181 50 

$2,471 57 

Heirs of Charles Bod well, land damages, well, &c, on line 

of brick supply conduit, (by agreement) $3,700 00 

Dockham & Co., adjustment of suit between plaintiff and 

City Council . . $5,000 0Q 



LOWELL WATER BOARD 13 

December 31. — Proprietors of Locks and Canals on Merri- 
mack River, in full consideration for land and water 
taken by the city in the construction of the Water 
Works, (by agreement of said Proprietors and the City 
Council, ) fifty thousand dollars $50,000 00 

It is a source of much gratification that we are able to 
report the complete and satisfactory settlement of the 
last-named important claim. 

The ' following sums, including interest, have been 
awarded by the County Commissioners to the persons 
named, for damages to their estates by the closing of 
Sixth street, in the construction of the Reservoir, and 
will be paid in the next monthly draft : 

Michael McGlynn $269 25 

Wm. B. Franklin 269 25 

Peter Eiley 149 58 

Michael McGuire 179 50 

Claims for damages to land and wells, in consequence 
of the construction of the brick supply conduit, at Paw- 
tucketville, were, by agreement between the Water Board 
and the several parties holding the claims, referred to the 
arbitrament of Daniel S. Richardson, Jacob Rogers and 
Benjamin Walker, who have this day reported the fol- 
lowing awards, but the amounts have not yet been paid : 

January 1, 1876. — West Congregational Society $497 83 

Atkinson C. Varnum. 755 33 

John J. Colton 721 17 

Peter S. Coburn 783 94 

Abner H. Marshall 429 16 

Foster Perham 462 SI 

The following-named persons have also presented 
claims for damages to w r ells and land, in consequence of 



14 REPORT OF THE 

the building of the supply conduit, and these, also, by 
agreement between the Water Board and claimants, have 
been referred to the above-named arbitrators ; no action 
on the cases has yet been taken, but it is expected that 
they will be settled very soon : 

John F. Tabor, Mrs. Susan Coburn, Louisa M. Wells, Herbert Mar-" 
shall, Orford R. Blood, George W. Coburn, John M. Hodge, Jr. 

Besides the above, the only unsettled claims for land 
or well damages, known to the Board, are held by the 
following-named persons : 

Samuel Fay, Henry Emery, Eliza D. Blood. 

ITEMS OF OPERATIONS FOR THE YEAR. 

The total consumption of water for the year ending 
December 31, 1875, is 445,017,098 gallons, being a daily 
average of 1,219,225, against 789,208 gallons for the pre- 
vious year. 

The amount of water rates for the year has been 
$82,861.60, against $69,307.39 for the previous year. 

The length of street mains, now laid, is 47 1 1 2 miles, an 
increase for the year of 4 1 7 2 miles. 

The total number of services at this time is 3,754, an 
increase of 526 during the year. 

The total number of water takers is 8,390, an increase 
of 1,452 during the year. 

There has been consumed in pumping water 414$jjjj) ne ^ 
tons of coal, against 331 tons last year. 

For a more detailed and critical statement of the 
expenses, incident to pumping water and to the workings 
of the pumping engine for the year, we refer to the 



LOWELL WATER BOARD. 15 

accompanying carefully-prepared report of Mr. George 
E. Evans, the Engineer of the city. 

STATEMENT. 

The following statement shows the cost, including 
interest on the Water Loan v in excess of receipts for 
water rates of the Lowell Water Works to December 31, 

1875: 

Net cost to January 1, 1875, (see last Annual Eeport) . ..$1,695,375 86 

Expenditures for the year ending December 
31, 1875: 

For cast iron pipe and special 

castings, $26,605 77 

Gates, Hydrants and Meters, . . 4,574 30 

Labor, materials and other ex- 
pense on extensions. ...... . 31,693 75 

Total for extensions $62,873 82 

Land Damages, exclusive of the 
amount paid Proprietors of 
Locks and Canals on Merri- 
mack River $22,176 82 

Land and Water damages paid 
Proprietors Locks and Canals 
on Merrimack Eiver 50,000 00 

Total land and water damages. 72,176 82 

H. R. Worthington, on account of 

new engine $17,000 00 

New Force Main, to connect new 

engine 1,255 25 

Total on account of new engine and connections, 18,255 25 
Amount carried forward, $153,305 89 



16 REPORT OP THE 

Amount brought forward, $153,305 89 

For new heater in boiler room.. . $9S0 22 
Expended on Engine House and 

for bulkhead, to adapt building 

to new engine, 579 46 

$1,559 68 
Total expended on construction account o $154,S65 57 

Current expense of pumping water and main- 
taining the Works, including rents, salaries, 
coal, oil, &c $15,230 21 

Interest on Water Loan . 105,565 00 

Current expenses and interest. 120,795 21 

Total.. . . , . $1,971,036 64 

Credits. 

Amounts received by City Treasurer, for water 

rates and service pipes, for year $93,094 35 

deceived shutting off and letting on fees 150 00 

Received from sundry accounts, sent Treasurer 
for collection, 1,663 79 

Total credits for the year 94,908 14 

Net cost to December 31, 1875 $ 1,876,1 28 50 

Income from water rates, and current expenses for 
year 1875, compared : 

Interest on Water Loan, as above $105,565 00 

Current expenses ' 15,230 21 

Total interest and current expenses 120,795 21 

Water rates charged for the year 82,86 1 60 

Current expenses, in excess of income $37,933 61 



LOWELL WATER ROARD. 17 

On the first of July, Mr. French, in consequence of 
continued illness, which demanded his entire relief 
from labor, presented his resignation as clerk of the 
Board. It was accepted with regret. 

Mr. James M. Battles was elected clerk of the Board, 
September 2d, after having served some weeks as clerk 
pro tern. His experience as an accountant has rendered 
him peculiarly qualified for this position, and we consider 
the city fortunate in securing his services. 

Mr. George Runels, President, resigned his position as 
a member of this Board on the 9th of November. His 
rare judgment in practical business had inspired great 
confidence in him by his associates, and we deeply 
regretted that his extended business engagements neces- 
sitated his taking this step. The vacancy has not yet 
been filled by the City Council. 

It gives us pleasure to testify to the faithfulness and 
efficiency of Mr. Griffin, the Superintendent of the 
Works, and we refer you to his report, herewith, for the 
details of the operations under his charge, a partial 
abstract of which we have embodied in previous pages. 

Respectfully submitted. 

C. H. LATHAM, 
BENJ. WALKER, 
ALBERT A. HAGGETT, 
EARL A. THISSELL. 



Engineer's Report. 



OFFICE OF CITY ENGINEER,) 

Lowell, January 5th, 1S76. ) 



To CYRUS H. LATHAM, Esq., 

President of the Lowell Water Board : 

The undersigned respectfully submits the following 
report of the work done by the pumping engine, and the 
records, as taken at the Reservoir. The calculations 
were made from the records kept by James P. Roberts, 
the efficient engineer at the pumping station. 

In the calculation of the "duty," one pound per square 
inch was added to the pressure on the pump for friction 
and bends between guage and pump-well. The record of 
ashes was not taken each month during the year, as it 
was impossible for the firemen to weigh them and attend 
to their daily duties. The quantity of ashes was about 
twelve per cent. 





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22 engineer's report. 

During the month of April the engine was run twelve 
days with one boiler only, and, in May, fourteen days. 
The fires under the boilers are built every morning, when 
the engine is to pump, and are burned as low as possible 
at night, working the steam down to fifteen or twenty 
pounds. When two fires are built, an allowance of six 
hundred pounds of coal is made for getting up steam, 
and four hundred when only one boiler is used. 

PUMPING STATION. 

Running Expenses foe the Yeae 1875. 

Salaries of engineer and firemen . $2,599 74 

358 tons (2000 lbs.) of coal consumed, a $7. 853 2,81137 

56.8' tons (2000 lbs.) of coal consumed, a $7.544 429 50 

0.63 tons (2000 lbs.) of coal (beating), a $7.853 4 95 

34J cords of wood consumed 205 20 

Gas for lighting Works 10 05 

39 gallons valvoline oil used 48 75 

71 gallons black engine oil used 27 80 

776 lbs. tallow used . 73 33 

54 lbs packing used 23 07 

164 pounds waste used 23 33 

Sundries ... 22 91 

Tools 39 83 

Eepairs on engine and boilers 59 30 

$6,379 13 



Cost of raising water into Reservoir, per million gallons. ... $14 33 
Cost of raising water, per million gallons, one foot high. . . . Q&t<j 

The cost of pumping is less than the cost ($6,610.55) 
given by the Superintendent, as the above only includes 
what was used during the year, making no account of 



engineer's report. 23 

materials, etc. on hand at the commencement of the year 
1876. The cost of raising a million gallons of water into 
the Reservoir, this year, has been reduced nearly thirty 
per cent. Although the engine has pumped one-third 
more hours than it did last year, this reduction has not 
come entirely from that source. Several important 
changes have been made by Mr. Roberts, which have 
reduced the running expenses considerably. A small 
boiler has been placed in the boiler room, which supplies 
the cylinder jackets with steam when the engine is not 
working ; and, by the use of this* boiler, fire is kept only 
on three and one-half square feet of grate surface, instead 
of twenty-five square feet, as was previously done when 
the fire was banked. When the engine is working the 
jackets are mostly supplied from the large boilers ; the 
small boiler evaporating only enough water to keep its 
level. The condensed water from the jackets is returned 
to the small boiler. 

In the flue, at the rear of the boilers, a water heater, 
thirty inches in diameter and twenty-four feet six inches 
in length, has been placed, which contains about nine 
hundred gallons. The water from the hot well is pumped 
through the heater into the boilers and the temperature is 
increased about seventeen degrees. The donkey pumps 
have been connected with the heater. By this arrange- 
ment the waste heat from the boilers is utilized as far as 
possible. 



reservoir. 

This year the water in the Reservoir has been higher 
than it was last year. It has been above high-water 



24 



ENGINEERS REPORT. 



mark fifty-five days during the year. The maximum 
depth of water is twenty feet. 

The following table shows the average depth of water, 
the number of gallons, and the temperature of the water 
in the Reservoir, and also the temperature of the air for 
each month in the year. The temperature of the water 
was taken at 6 A. m. and 6 p. m., and of the air at a. m., 
1 p. m. and 6 p. m. 



months. 



January, . . 
February,., 

March, 

April, 

May 

June,.... . . 

July, 

August, . . , 
September, 
October,. . . 
November,, 
December, . 



Depth in 
feet. 



19.58 
19.42 
20.13 
19.36 
19.30 
19.50 
20.12 
18.70 
18.71 
19.00 
18.80 
18.89 



Quantity in 
U. S. gallons. 



29,873,800 
29,628,700 
30,811,400 
29,500,500 
29,419,000 
29,733,700 
30,810,000 
28,408,900 
28,432,000 
28,896,100 
28,565,300 
28,715,300 



TEMPERATURE. 



Of Water. Of Air 



40° 
40.1° 
40° 
42.9° 

54.6° 

64.2° 

68.4° 

70.8° 

65.1° 

53° 

40.2° 

35.8° 



16.7° 
17.4° 

25. r 

40° 

56.5° 

66. S° 

72.2° 

70.8° 

58.9° 

47.6° 

30.9° 

25.7° 



Respectfully submitted. 



GEO. E. EVANS. 



Superintendents Report. 



SUPEKINTENDENT'S OFFICE,) 

Januaey 1st, 1876. [ 



To the Lowell Water Board 



Gentlemen — I submit to you, this, my Third Annual 
Report, showing the extensions, repairs and improve- 
ments made upon the City Water Works during the year 
ending December 31, 1875. 

Work of laying mains and services was suspended 
through the months of January, February and March, 
but the extreme cold came on and continued, until the 
frost, in many places, had gone down below the mains, 
which was cause for alarm for the security of the city in 
case of fire. " Under the circumstances, the only way to 
protect the mains, was to pump the water and waste it 
through them, which was done, and the result was that 
at no time during the cold weather was there a line of 
main pipe which would not respond to a call for water. 

The number of services which froze in the streets was 
about one hundred. Some of them we were obliged to 
dig up, in order to thaw out, but most of them were 
thawed by hot water being forced in from the cellar, with 
a Hildreth & Johnson Hand Force Pump, at a great 



26 . superintendent's report. 

saving in expense, over any other method which has come 
to my notice. As fast as frozen services were reported 
they were promptly taken care of, and with little trouble 
to the takers. The services began to freeze January 18, 
and continued to do so until into March. 

There was no trouble with frozen mains, except in two 
cases: one on Kirk street, a four-inch pipe, which 
was on a dead end and was not laid at a proper depth. 
This pipe burst on Sunday, May 2d ; it was repaired and 
the water again let on at one o'clock, p. m. of the same 
day. The other case was the pipe connecting with the 
old hydrant, formerly in use, at the corner of Summer 
and Gorham streets, which burst April 13th ; there was 
no damage done, except the settling of the sidewalk. 
This piece of pipe was taken out and the branch 
capped, which makes secure the line at this point. I 
think it can be truly said that the Water Department of 
this city was in the best condition, during the extreme 
cold, of any city in New England, as all the other cities, 
as far as I can learn, had frozen mains. 

There was laid a two-inch line for the Lowell Hosiery 
Mill, from Broadway. This was laid on account of the 
Mill being troubled with dirty water coming from the 
six-inch line through Mt. Vernon street, which was 
caused from the fact that, at the point where the main is 
tapped for the Mill, there is a low point, and all the dirt 
settles at this point, and the almost constant drawing of 
the two-inch pipe from the six-inch, this point would 
seem to take it in instead of allowing it to settle, as it 
would, had there been a smaller outlet at the point. By 
changing the pipe and taking the water from a higher 
level and a larger pipe it has been much better, and I 
think the Mill will have little trouble hereafter. 



s rintendent's report. 27 

The most important main was laid on Kirk street. 
The old four-inch pipe, with the old hydrants, were taken 
out and the six-inch pipe, with new flash hydrants, put 
in and connected with the twenty-inch line at French 
street, also with the twelve-inch line on Merrimack street. 

The number of services laid during the year was 526, 
which, added to those previously put in, make 3,754. 
The amount of service pipe laid is 18,345 feet of three- 
quarters inch diameter, 1,684 feet of one-inch diameter, 
68 feet of one and one-quarter inch diameter, making a 
total of 20,098 feet, or 3.8 miles ; to this add amount laid 
previously, and we have a total of 154,276 feet, or 29.21 
miles. The amount of cast-iron pipe laid the past year, 
in connection with the service pipe,, is 24,956 feet, or 4.72 
miles, to which add the pipe previously laid, will make 
248,747, or 47.12 miles. The sizes are shown in the 
annexed schedule. 

Gates were put in, on lines laid previous to 1875, as 
follows : 



line. 



One six-inch on corner of Union and Gorham streets. 

One six-inch, corner Gorham and Summer streets, on Gorham street 

One six-inch, between Warren and Hurd streets. 
One six-inch, corner Liberty and School streets. 
One six-inch, corner Thirteenth and Bridge streets. 
One twelve-inch, corner Bridge and Sixth streets. 

The following-mentioned gates were put in on lines laid 
this year, and are for fire service : 

One twelve-inch, for Hamilton Manufacturing Company, off Jackson 
street line. 

One twelve-inch, for Appleton Company, off Jackson street line. 

One twelve-inch, for Lowell Machine Shop, off Jackson street line. 

Two eight-inch, for Middlesex Company, off Warren street line. 

One twelve-inch, for Lowell Manufacturing Company, off Market 
street line. 



28 superintendent's report. 

Hydrants have been moved as follows : 

One hydrant, corner Middlesex and Branch streets. 

One hydrant on Dover street. 

One hydrant on School street. 

One hydrant on Central, near Gorham street. 

One new hydrant has been put in on corner Westford and Loring 
streets. 

Twelve hydrants have been raised, in consequence of alteration of 
grade of streets or sidewalks. 

One fountain has been moved from Merrimack street, near Post Office, 
to point opposite Massachusetts Corporation block, near Bridge street. 

One fountain has been put in on Bridge street, near Third street. 

One stone trough has been put in on Broadway, near School street. 

FILTERING. GALLERY AND CONDUIT. 

The filtering gallery and conduit (brick and iron) appear 
to be in good condition and have not needed any repairs 
this year. 

ENGINE BUILDINGS. 

It has been found necessary to repair the roof of the 
coal shed, it having settled, causing it to leak badly. 
This was done by putting in vertical timbers, resting on 
shoes laid in cement, bringing the roof to the proper 
level. It was also found necessary to put in a bulk-head 
to the engine house cellar, as there was no way to get 
heavy material into the cellar, and the benefit of it has 
been already realized during the putting in of the foun^ 
dations for the new engine. 



*&* 



PUMPING ENGINES AND BOILERS. 

In the month of April there was put into the chimney 
flue in the boiler-house, a heater of the following dimen- 



superintendent's report. 29 

sions : 24 feet 6 inches long by 30 inches diameter, of 
5-16 inch iron. Before the heater was put in, cold water 
only could be used in the boiler, and the result was that 
the brass tubes became contracted and leaked. Since the 
heater was put in there has been no trouble or expense 
with the tubes, and a saving of six or eight per cent, has 
been realized in coal. 

There has been put in the boiler-house a small boiler 
for heating the jackets, size 7 feet 6 inches long, 23 inches 
diameter ; the fire-box contains 3 1-2 square feet of grate 
surface. This boiler makes a saving of three or four 
hundred pounds of coal every twenty-four hours, over one 
of the large steam boilers which it was necessary to use 
before this small boiler was put in. 

The engine, in the hands of Mr. Roberts, the efficient 
Engineer, has performed its work satisfactorily and will 
show by the Report, elsewhere, an increase of duty over 
last year. 

FORCE MAIN. 

There have been two leaks on the force main, one at 
the engine-house cellar, the other at the corner of Var- 
num and Sixth streets. These were repaired without 
interfering with the working of the engine. The new 
force main branch, put in to connect with the new engine, 
has been laid to the interior of the engine-house cellar, 
and a twenty-four-inch gate put on, ready to connect with 
the new engine. 

RESERVOIR. 

The embankments are in good condition and retain 
their proper shape ; the grass has come in well on the 



30 



superintendent's report. 



slopes and is forming a heavy sod. Last Spring there 
were several cords of manure put on the parts having the 
least sod ; the effect was beneficial, and I would advise the 
same treatment the coming Spring. At the point of 
entering the gate at the gate-house there has been a very 
wet, quaggy place, making it unsafe for travel. This is 
caused by the nature of the soil, it being springy. To 
remedy this there has been put in a stone sewer, which 
will relieve these springs and carry the water across the 
street into the gutter passing down Sixth street. 

The average monthly and daily consumption of water 
for the year 1875 is as follows : 



MONTHS. 



Gallons, 
monthly. 



Gallons, 
daily. 



January . . 
February. . 
March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . 
September, 
October. . . 
November. 
December . 



37,555,750 
38,580,690 
33,854,110 
27,624,180 
32,914,890 
39,442,350 
43,076,420 
39,062,200 
37,454,220 
34,635,820 
33,907,770 
48,034,480 



1,211,480 
1,377,880 
1,092,070 
920,810 
1,061,770 
1,314,750 
1,389,560 
1,260,070 
1,248,470 
1,117,280 
1,130,260 
1,549,500 



superintendent's report. 31 

The average daily consumption of water for the year 
has been about 1,222,300 gallons. 

There were eight leaks in mains this year, seven being 
in joints, one, a split in bell. All were in contract work. 

The total amount of bills sent to the City Treasurer, 
for collection for this department, for the year ending 
December 31, 1875, is as follows : 

Eor Water rates $82,861 60 

Service pipe and labor 5,526 82 

Other accounts 2,366 28 

$90,754 70 

EXPENDITURES. . 

Labor and Material : 

Extensions, services, &c $31,693 75 

Cast-iron pipe and specials 26,605 77 

Gates $2,186 60 

Hydrants 1,368 40 

Meters 1,019 30 

$4,574 30 

$62,873 82 
Current Expenses : 

Pumping $6,610 55 * 

Reservoir 862 01 

Office 674 75 

Printing, stationery, &c. 273 28 

Salaries 3,800 01 

Engineering 583 00 

Inspection 1,044 06 

Rent 412 50 

Miscellaneous „ 910 05 

$15,230 21 

Amount carried forward, $78, 104 03 



32 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 



Amount brought forward^ $78* 104 03 

Construction Account : 

Damages $72,176 82 

H. R. Worthington 1 7,000 00 

New Force Main 1,255 25 

Morris Engine 980 22 

Engine House 579 46 

$91,991 75 

Total cost $170,095 78 



Forty-one meters have been put in during the year. 
The total number of meters now in use is ninety-five. 
The kinds and sizes are as follows : 





f inch. 


J inch. 


1 inch. 


11 in. 


2 inch. 


4 inch. 


Total. 


Union Meter Company 


29 


24 


2 


1 


2 




58 




28 




4 




2 


2 


36 


Boston Machine Company . . 






1 








1 




57 


24 


7 


1 


4 


2 


95 



The total number of services laid to January 1, 1876, 
is 3,754 ; of these fourteen are for fire service ; 526 ser- 
vices have been.laid during this year. 

The total number of water takers is 8,390. The total 
number of persons supplied is 36,100, not including those 
in hotels, stores, saloons and other places of public resort. 

The number of takers who have had the water shut 
off, for non-payment of water rates, is 93. The number 
let on again, after payment, is 83. 

The number of abatements made is 74 ; amount 
$613.08. 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 



33 



WATER IS SUPPLIED FOR THE FOLLOWING USES. 



Families, 


7,227 


Holly Tree Inns, 


4 


Apothecaries, 


24 


Hospitals, 


2 


Armories, 


3 


Hot houses, 


5 


Artist studio, 


1 


Laundry, 


I 


Auction room, 


1 


Leather works, 


1 


Banks, 


7 


Markets : Meat, 


38 


Bar rooms, 


4 


Fish, 


5 


Bath rooms, 


1 


Marble works, 


3 


Barber shops, 


24 


Masonic Temple, 


1 


Bakeries, 


8 


Machine shops, 


28 


Bill poster, 


1 


Middles'x Mechan. 


Association, 1 


Billiard saloons, 


6 


Manufactories : 




Binderies, 


2 


Beit, 


2 


Boiler works, 


1 


Bobbins, 


1 


Boarding-houses, 


107 


Beer, 


3 


Bonnet bleachery, 


1 


Cap, 


1 


Brewery, 


1 


Carriage, 


2 


Brass finishers, 


2 


Clothing, 


3 


Bowling alley, 


1 


Cigar, 


1 


Bleachery, 


1 


Cologne, 


1 


Churches, 


12 


Comforter, 


1 


Coal yard, 


1 


Confectionery, 


4 


City Library, 


1 


Card clothing, 


1 


County Jail, 


1 


Curtain fixtures, 


1 


Club rooms, 


2 


Croquet, 


1 


City Government Building, 


1 


Drain pipe, 


1 


Court House, 


1 


Felting, 


2 


City Stable, 


1 


File, 


1 


City work-shops, 


2 


Frear stone, 


1 


Dye houses, 


2 


Hosiery, 


1 


Eating houses, 


5 


Harness, 


2 


Founderies, 


1 


Jack screw, 


2 


Grist mill, 


1 


Patent medicine, 


1 


Galvanized iron works, 


1 


Paper bags, 


1 


Gardens, 


5 


Paper boxes, 


4 


Halls, 


14 


Sausage, 


1 


Hotels, 


9 


Screw, 


1 



34 



supeiuntendent's report. 



WATER IS SUPPLIED FOR THE FOLLOWING USES. 



Manufactories : 
Scale, 


1 


Rooms, 
Railroads : 


174 


Stamp, 

Soap, 

Suspenders, 

Strap, 

Shuttle, 


1 

3 
2 
1 
1 


Depots, 
Car houses, 
Engine houses, 

Roll coverers, 

Saloons, 


4 
1 
3 
1 
55 


Shoe, 


1 


Sisters of Notre Dame, 


1 


Sash and blind, 


.1 


School houses, 


28 


Shirt, 
Wire goods, 


1 
2 


Schools, private, 
Stores and shops, 


1 

270 


Woolen goods, 


1 


Stucco works, 


1 


Worsted yarn, 

Wooden ware, 

Old Ladies' Home, 


1 
1 
1 


Stationary engines, 
Street sprinkler, 
Stables : Private, 


16 

1 
282 


Orphan Asylum, 
Offices, 


2 
135 


Livery and sale, 
Truckmen's, 


13 

7 


Pork packers, 


2 


Horse railroad, 


1 


Police Station, 


1 


Steam fire engine houses 


and 


Photograph galleries, 


12 


hook and ladder houses, 


8 


Printing offices, 
Print works, 


6 
1 


Tannery, 
Trunk makers, 


1 

1 


Planing mills, 


1 


Wood yard, 


1 


Plaster works, 


1 


Young Women's Home, 


1 



TOTAL NUMBER OF FIXTURES. 



Aquaria, 


4 


Fountains : 




Boilers for heating, 


45 


Combination, 


11 


Taps, 


11,110 


Private, 


33 


Sinks, 


7,700 


Horse troughs, 


5 


Basins, 


841 


Tumbler washers, 


9 


Bath tubs, 


380 


Drinking hydrants, 


9 


Water closets, 


803 


Fish tank, 


1 


Set Wash Tubs, 


370 


Fish pond, 


1 


Hose, 


1,567 


Private hydrants, 


4 


Urinals, 


106 







35 



For location of new gates and hydrants I refer you to 
the accompanying schedules. 

Since my last report Mr. Frank E. French has resigned 
his position as clerk on account of ill health. His resig- 
nation was followed by the election of Mr. James M. Bat- 
tles to the position, for which he is so well adapted from 
his long experience in clerical business. 

Thanking you for all your cordial support to me in the 
discharge of my varied duties, I respectfully submit this 
report. 

S. P. GRIFFIN, 

Superintendent. 



30 



superintendent's report 



SCHEDULE 

OF CHARGES FOR WATER, BY MONTHS, FROM COMMENCEMENT 
TO DECEMBER 31, 1875. 



MONTHS 

January 

February, 

March , 

April 

May 

June 

July, 

August 

September, 

October 

November, 

December, 



1873. 



$6,124 94 
785 89 
3,9S8 16 
5,818 78 
4,833 52 
2,728' 30 
2,827 01 
9,729 05 
761 21 
1,571 72 



),168 64 



1874. 



$363 94 

35 33 

50,200 10 

1,739 56 

3,274 09 

2,865 86 

1,889 03 

498 50 

3,245 06 

872 10 

634 03 

3,689 79 



),307 39 



1875. 



$418 96 

235 43 

65,417 68 

935 20 

2,147 96 

2,987 43 

1,926 31 

449 86 

865 90 

2,947 93 

573 35 

3,955 59 



52,861 60 



*Beginning of Water year April 1. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



37 



SCHEDULE NO. 1. 

SHOWING THE SIZES AND LENGTHS OF PIPE LAID IN THE EXTEN- 
SION OF THE WORKS, FOE THE YEAR ENDING DEC. 31, 1875. 



Steeet. 


BETWEEN WHAT STBEETS. 


LENGTH IN FEET. 




16 
Inch. 


12 
Inch. 


S 
Inch. 




Inch. 


i • 
Inch. 


■> 
In. 


Abbott, 


Central and Lawrence, 








14 


552 




Beech, 


Sixth and Tenth, 








480 






Beech, 


Third and Sixth, 










258 




Blossom, 
Cambridge, 


Gorham, near Fair Ground, 

west, 
Chelmsford and Hale, 








660 


324 




Canton, 


Middlesex and Princeton, 








432 






Central, 


Warren and Jackson, 




180 










Congress, 


Thorndike and Gorham, 








36 


993 




Conant, 


Methuen, northerly, 








1064 






Chelmsford, 


Cambridge and Daly, 




400 










Daly, 


Chelmsford and Grand, 










228 




Faulkner, 


Lawrence and the Canal, 






338 








Grand, 


Westford and Chelmsford, 










72 




Hildreth, 


Bridge and Town line, 








2244 






June, 


Thirteenth and Twelfth, 










384 




Jackson, 


Central and Middlesex, 


2124 






192 






Kidder, 


Crosby and Gorham, 








126 






Kirk, 


Merrimack and French, 








816 






Lawrence, 


Agawam and Faulkner, 






244 


24 






Leroy, 


Coral and Loring, 










96 




Loring, 


Leroy and Westford, 








120 






London, 


Gorham, westerly, 








816 






West London, 


Main, westerly, 








591 






Lowell Mfg. Co. 


Market to the Mills, 








156 


48 


Livingston, 


Carter and the Brook, 








14 


480 





38 



superintendent's report. 



SCHEDULE NO. 1— Continued. 





BETWEEN WHAT STEEETS. 


LENGTH IN FEET. 




16 
Inch. 


12 
Inch. 


8 
Inch. 


6 
Inch. 


4 
Inch. 


2 
Inch. 


Main, 


Lincoln and West London, 






* 


225 






Methuen, 


Extension to Con ant, 






570 








Mt. Vernon, 


Bowers and Gold, 








318 






Mt. Wash'gton, 


Bowers and Pawtucket, 








726 






Middlesex, 


Jackson and Thorndike, 




324 










Oliver, 


School and Wanalancet, 








431 






Osgood, 


Liberty and Westford, 










300 




Pine, 


Westford and Liberty, 








780 






Princeton, 


Wilder and Porter, 








420 






Porter, 


Princeton and Pine, 






999 


28 






Robinson, 


Congress and the Railroad, 








12 


375 




Stevens, 


Pine and Parker, 






654 


13 






Taylor, 


Lawrence and Merrill, 










138 




Thirteenth, 


June and Bridge, 








564 






Wanalancet, 


Oliver and Bowers, 








200 






Warren, 


Church and Central, 






1560 


14 




20 


West Third, 


Bridge and Coburn, 








840 






Williams, 


Central and George, 








84 






Western Av., 


Fletcher and the Railroad, 








480 






Western Av., 


The Railroad, westerly to 
Freight Depot, 

Lowell Hosiery Mill, 










375 




Additional, 
Broadway, 


2124 


904 


4365 


12920 


4623 


20 
185 



Total amount laid this year, 24,956 feet, 

Add amount laid last year, as per schedule 

in Annual Report for 1874, 34,235.4 

Add amount laid previous to 1874, 189,556 



248,747.4 feet, or 47.12 miles. 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 



39 



SCHEDULE NO. 2. 

LIST OF STOP GATES SET FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEM- 
BER 81, 1875. 



Steeet. 


Location. 


a" 


M 


d 

GO 


i— i 


•* 


Abbott, 


On west line of Lawrence street, 13.5 feet, 
North from south line of Abbott street, 










1 


Beach, 


5 feet north from north line of Third street, 
20 feet west from east line of Beach street, 










1 


Beach, 


1.5 feet north from north line of Sixth street, 
16 feet west from east line of Beach street, 








1 




Blossom, 


1 foot west from west line of Gorham street, 
15 feet south from north line of Blossom street, 








1 




Cambridge, 


On east line of Chelmsford street, 

22 feet westerly from east line of Cambridge st. , 










1 


Carpet Lane, 


2 feet south from south line of Market street, 
3. 7 feet west from east line of Carpet Lane, 








1 




Canton, 


On south line of Middlesex street, 

15 feet west from east line of Canton street, 








1 




Congress, 


On west line of Thorndike street, 

11.5 feet north from south line of Congress st., 










1 


Conant, 


3 feet north from north line of Methuen street, 
11 feet east from west line of Conant street, 








1 




Faulkner, 


13 feet west of Canal, 

25.5 feet south of north line of Faulkner street, 






1 






French, 


14. 8 feet west of east line of Kirk street, 

13.3 feet north from south line of French street, 








1 




Grand, 


1\ feet south from south line of Westford street, 
11 feet west from east line of Grand street, 










1 


Gorham, 


7 feet north from south line of Summer street, 
16 feet east from west line of Gorham street, 








1 




Jackson, 
Jackson, 


128.5 feet west from west line of Central street, 
23 feet north from south line of Jackson street. 

(Corporation connection) 
2. 5 feet west from line of Central street, 
19 feet north from south line of Jackson street, 


1 


1 








Jackson, 


21 feet west from west line of Elliott street, 
22^ feet north from south line of Jackson street, 
(Corporation connection,) 




1 









40 



superintendent's report. 



SCHEDULE NO. 3— Continued. 



Street. 



Jackson, 

Jackson, 

Kirk, 

Kirk, 

Livingston, 

Liberty, 

London, 

Main, 

Market, 

Mt. Wash'gton, 

Oliver, 

Pine, 

Sixth, 

Stevens, 

Stevens, 

Taylor, 

Thirteenth, 



Location. 



9. 5 feet east of east line of private street to L. M. 

S. Foundry, 
24 feet north from south line of Jackson street, 

(Corporation connection, ) 

1 foot north from north line of Middlesex street, 
19 feet west from east line of Jackson street, 

6 feet north from south line of French street, 
19.5 feet east from west line of Kirk street, 

5 feet north from north line of Merrimack street, 

17 feet west from east line of Kirk street, 

11 feet north from north line of Carter street, 

10 feet west from east line of Livingston street, 

16.5 feet east from west line of School street, 
29.5 feet north from south line of Liberty street, 

3 feet west from west line of Gorham street, 
15.5 feet north from south line of London street, 

On south line of Lincoln street, 

12 feet east from west line of Main street, 

10.5 feet east of west line of Carpet Lane, 
27.5 feet south from north line of Market street, 
(Corporation connection,) 

3 feet south from south line of Pawtucket street, 

11 feet west from east line of Mt. Wash'gton st., 

On west line of School street, 

8 feet north from south line of Oliver street, 

5. feet west from east line of Hastings street, 

21 feet north from south line of Pine street, 

7. 5 feet east from east line of Bridge street, 
18.5 feet north from south line of Sixth street, 

12.1 feet south from south line of "Westford st., 

22 feet east from west line of Stevens street, 

On south line of Pine street, 

19 feet east from west line of Stevens street, 

On east line of Lawrence street, 

11 feet south from north line of Taylor street, 

2 feet west from east line of Bridge street, 

18 feet north from south line of Thirteenth st. 3 



superintendent's report. 



41 



SCHEDULE NO. 2— Continued. 



Stkeet. 


Location. 








a 








--; 


-M 


oo 


CO 
1 


-* 


Union, 


On east line of Gorharn street, 






22 feet south from north line of Union street, 












Warren, 


5 feet east from east line of Central street, 

16 feet north from south line of Warren street, 






1 






Warren, 


262 feet east from east line of Central street, 
23.5 feet south from north line of Warren street, 
(Corporation connection,) 






1 






Warren, 


35 feet south from north of Warren street, 

31.5 feet from intersection of Hurd & Warren sts. , 








1 




Warren, 


2. 5 feet north from north line of Church street. 
21.3 feet west from east line of Warren street, 






1 






Warren, 


18 feet south from north line of Warren street, 

(Corporation connection,) 






1 






West Third, 


On west line of Bridge street, 

13 feet south from north line of West Third st., 








1 




Western Av. , 


3 feet west from west line of Fletcher street, 

21 feet north from south line of Western Avenue, 








1 





42 



THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF 



SCHEDULE NO; 3. 

LIST OP HYDRANTS SET FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBEE 31, 1875. 



Streets. 


Location. 


Abbott, 


268 feet easterly from Central street. 


Beach, 


246 feet north from Sixth street. 


Blossom, 


320 feet westerly from Gorham street. 


Canton, 


340 feet south from Middlesex street. 


Chelmsford, 


14 feet southerly from Daly street. 


Conant, 


391 feet northerly from Methuen street. 


Conant, 


1,029 feet northerly from Methuen street. 


Congress, 


225 feet northerly from Bobinson street. 


Congress, 


242 feet southerly from Robinson street, 


Faulkner, 


Opposite Counting-room, Chase Mill. 


Gardner, 


91 feet southerly from Market street. 


Hildreth, 


Opposite Jewett street. 


Hildreth, 


Corner of a street next northwesterly from Coburn st. 


Hildreth, 


385 feet northerly from street. 


Hildreth, 


800 feet northwesterly from street. 


Jackson, 


Corner of Central street. 


Jackson, 


Corner of Bowditch street. 


Jackson, 


8 feet westerly from Webster street. 


Jackson, 


49 feet westerly from Eliott street. 


Jackson, 


Corner of a private street, Appleton Corporation, 


Jackson, 


Corner of a private street, Appleton Corporation, 


Jackson, 


Corner of Middlesex street, replaced an old hydrant. 



THE LOWELL WATER BOARD, 



43 



SCHEDULE NO. 3— Continued. 



Streets. 

Kirk, 
Kirk, 

Livingston, 

London, 

London, 

Mt Washington, 

Mt. Vernon, 

Oliver, 

Pine, 

Porter, 

Robinson, 

Stevens, 

Stevens, 

Stevens, 

Thirteenth, 

Westford, 

Warren, 

Western Avenue, 

William, 



Location. 



Corner of Merrimack street, replaced an old hydrant. 

Corner of Lee street, replaced an old hydrant. 

410 feet northerly from Carter street. 

701 feet westerly from Gorham street. 

164 feet westerly from Main street 

348 feet north from Bowers street. 

318 feet south from Bowers street 

Corner of Wanalancit street 

452 feet westerly from Hastings street. 

Corner of Princeton street. 

225 feet westerly from Congress street. 

337 feet southerly from Westford street 

Corner of Pine street. 

618 feet southerly from Pine street 

Corner of June street. 

Corner of Loring street 

299 feet easterly from Central street. 

289 feet westerly from Fletcher street. 

Corner of Central street. 



44 



THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF 



SCHEDULE 

OP PROPERTY AT THE PIPE YARD, JANUARY 1, 1876. 



6 lengths 30-inch 


pipe, 


9 « 


' 24 




45 ' 


20 * 




21 ♦ 


16 




81 * 


12 




19 ' 


8 




1093 ' 


6 




42 " 


4 




56 feet 


rubber-coated 2-inch pipe, 


90 " 


<< 


li " 


555 « 


<< 


1 


5040 " 


<< 


1 " 


27 " 


<< 


i « 


32 " 


pieces 30-inch pipe, 


9 " 


" 24 


a 


57 " 


" 20 


it 


34 " 


" 16 


ti 


45 " 


" 12 


tt 


28 '• 


" 8 


tt 


15 " 


" 6 


(< 


13 " 


" 4 


a 


6 30-i 


och turns, 




7 24 


<< a 




16 20 


n it 




7 16 


<t a 





2 12-inch turns, 

8 8" 

12 6 " 
7 4 « «< 

1 20 to 12-inch reducer, 

2 16 to 12 

1 16 to 8 

2 12 to 10 
1 12 to 8 
5 12 to 6 
1 10 to 8 
1 8 to 6 
1 6 to 4 

1 29 x 6-inch 4 way (damaged), 
120x6 " 4 " 
1 16x12 " 4 « 
1 16x6 « 4 " 

3 12x12 " 4 " 

23 12x6 " 4 " 
13 8x6 " 4 " 
11 8x8 " 4 » 

24 6x6 " 4 « 
9 4x4 " 4 " 
3 20x12" 3 " 
1 20x6 " 3 «« 



THE LOWELL WATER BOARD. 



45 



SCHEDULE OF PKOPERTY— Continued. 



1 16 x 16-inch 3 way, 



1 16x12 " 


3 


<< 


1 16x8 » 


3 


<« 


3 16x6 « 


3 


(< 


4 12x12 " 


3 


(< 


8 12x6 " 


3 


(c 


17 8x6 " 


3 


<< 


75 6x6 " 


3 


(< 


15 4x4 " 


3 


(c 


2 2xf " 


3 


(( 


4 Uxl^ " 


3 


<< 


45 1 x 1 " 


3 


c< 


21 fxf «« 


3 


<< 


41 Ixf " 


3 


<< 


6 lx| " crosses, 


55 fxf " 


It 




1 2-inch elbow, 




2 H " 






45 1 






43 | 






19 |-inch -J elbow 




10 1 " i 


si 




90 1-inch plugs 


. 




30 | 






246 1 " solder nipples, 


144 | " " 




cc 



92 1-inch bushings, 


2 reducer couplings, 


990 |-in 


ch 


30 li < 


« 


615 1 < 


i << 


4 1| ' 


c< 


212 | ' 


unions, 


40 1 ' 


rubber-coated unions, 


2 li ' 


Si i( 


15 | ' 


a a 


1 2 « 


Corporation cock, 


3 li < 


.< 


133 | « 


a 


20 | ' 


" cement, 


2 2 ' 


stop and waste cocks, 


58 1 ' 


<< << 


5 li ' 


<< (i 


126 | " 


<« « 


5 30-in 


ch sleeves, 


6 30 ' 


i " 


2 24 ' 


<< 


8 24 ' 


h " 


3 20 < 


SI 


6 16 ' 


« 


4 16 " 


i « 


9 12 « 


< <( 



46 



THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF 



SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY— Continued. 



17 1 2-inch £ sleeves, 


6 10 ' 


< n 


13 8 < 


i << 


12 6 ' 


< <« 


16 4 ' 


« u 


1 20 ' 


' cap, 


5 16 ' 




14 12 ' 




11 8 ' 




14 6 < 




3 4 < 




1 20 ' 


' stop-gate, 


3 6 < 


« 


1 4 ' 


« 


1 8 < 


t i< 


1 10 ' 


' " (old pattern), 


5 gate box frames, 


14 " covers, 


14 hydrant box frames, 


18 " covers, 


4 gate boxes, 


30 hydrant boxes, 


4 work benches, 


2 piping " 


3 vises, 


1 appa] 


-atus for testing meters, 



1 pipe-testing machine, 

1 cement lining " 

6 tool boxes, 

10 pair piping tongs, 

2 sets die plates and dies, 
2 service pipe cutters, 

1 washer cutter, 

2 brooms, 

1 platform scale, 
1 counter " 

3 stop-gate wrenches, 

4 hydrant " 

1 " nut wrench, 
1 1-inch stop and waste wrench, 
4 | " " " wrenches, 

1 stop nut wrench, 

1 2-J inch stop cock wrench, 

2 wagon wrenches, 

7 monkey " 

2 paving plank, 

4 " hammers, 

2 hand stone " 

1 stone hammer, 

6 calking hammers, 
20 " sets, 
17 striking hammers 



THE LOWELL WATER BOARD. 



47 



SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY— Continued. 



2 nail hammers, 

3 sledge " 
1 plane, 

1 axe, 

1 hatchet, 

11 crowbars, 

2 trowels, 

4 screw drivers, 

3 hand saws, 
2 buck saws, 
2 saw horses, 

12 cold chisels, 
6 steel cutters, 

2 framing squares, 
2 " chisels, 
460 service caps, 
420 " boxes, 

4 wheelbarrows, 

2 iron tooth rakes, 
2 barrels cement, 
33 rammers, 
2 paving mauls, 

5 lead pots, 

2 furnaces, 

3 soldering furnaces, 
3 small lead ladles, 



2 large lead ladles, 

2 sets blocks and and falls, 

3 extra " 
48 shovels, 
55 picks, 

2 snow shovels, 

2 square " 
80 shovel handles, 
25 pounds castings, 

9 cords hard pine wood, 

1 cord logs for blasting, 

5 spoons " 

12 rubber packing for hydrants, 

1 copper goose-neck, 
35 feet drain pipe, 
1 pounds shims and wedges, 
108 " steel in drills, 
75 " " •' plugs, 

5 chains, 
1 cast-iron forge, 

1 copper pump, 

1 tin 

1 force " 

1 iron pump and boring machine, 

8 iron bands, 
12 lugstraps, 



48 



THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF 



SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY— Continued. 



2 stoves, 


3 barrels charcoal, 


1 set gate trucks, 


2 " cement, 


1000 pounds wrought iron, 


£ barrel white clay, 


264 horse shoes, 


15 pounds gasket, 


50 pounds horse shoe nails, 


G tag ropes, 


20 " calks, 


3 sling " 


2i " steel, 


8 wooden plugs, 


500 " scrap iron, 


3 syphons, 


75 " nuts, 


50 pounds mixed paint, 


25 " washers, 


1 desk, 


100 " board nails, 


1 portable closet, 


1 set blacksmith tools, 


1 seive, 


1 bit stock, 


25 pounds dualin, 


3 bits, 


112 solder, 


1 bucket tar, 


5 hydrant dippers, 


4 tons junk iron, 


1 hose reel, 


2 tapping machines, 


200 feet hose rubber, 


1 dry tapping machine, 


4 lantern globes, 


6 hydrant screws, 


\ gross lamp wicks, 


11 stop gate " 


17 lanterns, 


1 soldering mould, 


2 ice chisels, 


587 pounds lead pipe, 


\ side leather, 


3120 " " bars, 


1 8 pounds rosin, 


29 f-inch lead connections, 


1 sprinkler, 


5 1" 


2 pinch bars, 


10 lj " 


2 probing bars, 


6 soldering irons, 


1 rattan broom, 



THE LOWELL WATER BOARD. 



49 



SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY— Continued. 



1 two-quart measure, 
1 tunnel, 
40 pounds borax, 

1 ten-gallon can, 

2 one " " 

2 i 

10 cast-iron washers, 
2 derricks, 
200 pounds rope for blasting, 
2 iron-wood mallets, 
1 draw shave, 

1 mortar bed, 

2 measuring lines, 
2 tape lines, 

1 kerosene barrel, 

1 faucet, 

2% tons hay, 
200 pounds straw, 

2 bushels corn, 
li " meal, 
9 " oats, 
1 grain box, 



1 wagon jack, 

1 horse, 

3 harnesses, 

2 surcingles, 
2 blankets, 

1 rubber cover, 
, 1 brush, 

1 curry-comb, 
. 2 hay forks, 

1 manure fork, 

1 pung, 

2 wagons, 

4 tons coal, 
1200 feet lumber, 

1 store house and workshop, 
1 carriage house, 
1 stable, 
1 shed, 

1 blacksmith shop, 
7 post hydrants (old), 
500 feet dis. main second-hand pipe. 



50 



THIRD ANNOAL REPORT OF 



SCHEDULE 

OF TOOLS AT ENGINE HOUSE. 



1 vise and bench, 

8 sets brasses for engine, 

2 sets differential blocks, 

1 piece 2-inch rope, 

2 sets fire irons, 

1 brass hydrant, 

2 axes, 

11 wrenches, 

2 jackscrews, 

3 hand hammers, 
26 cold chisels, 

1 ratchet drill, 
1 Scotch drill, 

3 caulking chisels, 
1 barometer, 

1 thermometer, 

1 water cooler and stand, 

1 desk, 

2 indicators, 

1 oil cupboard, 

2 oil cans, 

2 oil dishes, 

1 screen for pump well, 

1 pair scales, 

4 crowbars, 



64 feet |-inch chain, 

8 eye bolts, 
1 truck, 

1 key wrench, 

1 wrench for air pump, 

1 handsaw, 

2 gas lamps, 

1 high grade thermometer, 

4 brass bolts, 

5 spare pump valves, 

5 sets of spare weights for same, 
100 spare grate bars, 

1 1 pocket wrenches, 
7 pair gas tongs, 

3 sledge hammers, 

1 1 finished wrenches, 

12 drills, 

1 black-walnut cabinet, 

9 chairs, 

2 lengths fire hose, 

6 copper lamps, 
2 shovels, 

1 brush, 
100 bolts, 

1 bitstock and bits, 



THE LOWELL WATER BOARD. 



51 



SCHEDULE OF TOOLS, &c— Continued. 



2 ladles, ' 
1 pair stops, 
1 hoe, 
1 rake, 



1 fore plane, 

2 screw wrenches, 
100 feet rope, 2-inch, 

4 chisel bars, 



LIST OF TOOLS AT THE RESERVOIR, 



1 grindstone, 
1 sod cutter, 

1 scythe, 

2 sneaths, 
7 shovels, 
1 axe, 

1 saw, 



2 wheelbarrows, 

1 hoe, 

2 rakes, 
5 picks, 

3 forks, 

1 grass hook, 

2 spare screens, copper wire. 



FURNITURE, &c., IN DRAUGHTING ROOM. 



2 maps of City of Lowell, 

1 drawing table, with drawers, 

2 stools, 

3 chairs, 

2 inkstands, 
1 plumb, 



1 office table, 
1 drawing table, 
1 water urn, 
3 pitchers, 
1 tumbler, 
Drawing paper, &c. 



52 



THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF 



SCHEDULE 

OP FURNITURE, &c, IN OFFICE OF WATER BOARD AND SUPERIN- 
TENDENT. 



2 writing desks, 

2 office tables, 
1 book case, 

1 letter book press, 
1 clock, 
10 chairs, 

3 common chairs, 

4 inkstands, 
3 lanterns, 

I shovel, 
1 pick, 

1 set caulking tools, 

3 steel probing bars, 

2 hammers, 

4 brooms, 
1 brush, 



1 feather duster, 
8 assorted wrenches, 

1 monkey wrench, 
4 mats, 

2 waste baskets, 
1 portable closet, 

1 screw driver, 

2 carpets, 

1 stove, 

2 thermometers, 
1 hat rack, 

1 pair shears, 
15 feet lead pipe, 
1 tunnel, 
1 key rack, 
1 spittoon. 






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RBl , 'Pii7V 
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fftlfl' 



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SEMI-CENTENNIAL 



REPORT 



OF THE 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



OF THE 



CITY OF LOWELL. 




[Published by order of the Board.] 



LOWELL, MASS.: 
TIMES PUBLISHING CO., BOOK AND JOB PRINTERS, No. 12 MIDDLE STREET. 

187G. 



REPORT 



In a community like ours, recent in its origin, rapid in its 
development, with a population largely recruited from the proletariat 
of Europe, and where the females have, from the start, largely out- 
numbered the males ; the great problems of Labor, Poverty, Pauperism, 
and Crime, "forever old, forever new," have presented themselves 
under novel and interesting aspects. Facts might be found in the ex- 
periences of Lowell tending strongly to refute, or, at least, to limit, 
certain propositions which have heretofore been accepted as axioms in 
Social Science. It has been said, for example, "that a great prepon- 
derance of numbers in one sex over the other, unrestrained by ties of 
family, and without the natural dependence of the different occupations 
and stations of life upon each other, almost invariably defines a locality 
in which the various forms of crime exist to excess;" that "an excess 
in the number of men leads to an increase of crimes against persons, 
while an excess of women increases crimes against property, in 
both cases relatively as to sex." * But although this proposition 
has been propounded and accepted a thousand times during the last 
fifty years, it clearly does not hold good as to Lowell. The women of 
this city, who are in excess of the men, have lived without marriage, 
following occupations attended with constantly recurring temptations 
and with large opportunities for vicious indulgences ; but, to their honor 
be it spoken, as well as to the honor of this city, and of the towns from 
which they came, the standard of female morality is nowhere higher 
than here. How far this is due to the admirable system of rules 

* Relations of Women to Crime, Popular Science Monthly, November, 1875, p. 3. 



adopted by our manufacturing companies for the regulation of their 
boarding-houses and for the conduct of their operatives during their 
hours of leisure as well as during their working hours — it is not here 
necessary to inquire ; but the fact itself is worthy of note, and like sev- 
eral other facts of Lowell history, will have its value for the next 
scientist who shall attempt to reconstruct the Science of Society. 

But, at present, ours is the humbler duty to gather and record the 
short and simple annals of the Lowell poor, their institutions, their 
officers, and the cost of their maintenance. 



EXPENDITURES FOR THE POOR. 



In 1826, the first town meeting ever held in Lowell "voted to 
grant four hundred dollars for the support of town paupers, the year 
ensuing." A similar vote was passed in 1827, and again in 1828. The 
appropriation for this object was increased in 1829 to six hundred dol- 
lars, and in 1830 to one thousand dollars. The same amount was ap- 
propriated in 1831. Twelve hundred dollars was the sum appropriated 
in 1832, after which the expenditures for this object were increased. 
In 1833, the sum so appropriated was twenty-two hundred dollars, 
and in 1834 it was twenty-five hundred dollars. Only fourteen hun- 
dred dollars were appropriated in 1835, but in April, 1836, the last 
town meeting ever held in Lowell appropriated three thousand dollars 
for the support of paupers during the year. 

The following exhibit shows how much the city has received from 
the State, and how much she has expended from her own treasury, dur- 
ing the forty years of her existence under the City Charter. 



TABLE OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES ON ACCOUNT 
OF PAUPERS IN LOWELL FROM 1836 TO 1875. 









EXPENDITURES OVER 


YEAR. 


EXPENDITURES. 


RECEIPTS. 


RECEIPTS. 


1836 


$9,289 58 


$3,928 41 


$9,239 87 


1837 


■9,238 02 


1,306 31 


7,931 61 


1838 


5,190 8<* 


3,635 46 


1,555 4 4 


1839 


5,385 41 


2,625 44 


2,759 97 


1840 


5.130 95 


1,869 10 


,3,261 85 


1841 


5,301 34 


2,740 27 


2,561 07 


1842 


5,372 81 


2,479 76 


2,893 05 


1 843 


4,752 74 


2,506 45 


2,246 29 


1844 


4,915 07 


2,502 61 


2,412 46 


184 5 


5,803 47 


2,400 02 


3,403 45 


1840 


8,006 39 


1,680 97 


6,325 4 J 


1847 


9,177 17 


2,602 14 


(1,575 03 


184S 


10,272 42 


4,771 79 


5,500 (13 


1849 


12,633 58 


5,227 30 


7.406 28 


1850 


13,67s 87 


5,574 99 


8,103 88 


1851 


15,917 28 


4,-161 59 


11,455 69 


1852 


14,580 02 


2,4 77 59 


12,102 43 


1853 


14,463 12 


4,360 23 


10,102 89 


1854 


13,021 34 


4,689 36 


8,331 93 


1 855 


11,841 31 


4,025 40 


7,815 91 


1 85li 


13,:<61 02 


3,266 74 


10.094 23 


1857 


14,110 29 


2,039 61 


12,070 63 


1858 


18,474 57 


3,075 74 


15,398 83 


1 859 


12,245 49 


3,363 98 


8,8 1 51 


1860 


9,«27 78 


3,767 49 


6,060 29 


18tU 


10,617 20 


5.048 57 


5,568 68 


18(12 


17,091 83 


1,722 56 


15,369 27 


1363 


12,276 91 


1,911 41 


li ',365 50 


1864 


11,874 47 


4,045 34 


7,,v29 13 


1865 


14,652 29 


4,363 59 


10,288 70 


1866 


15,248 96 


3,102 73 


12,146 23 


18(17 


17,263 92 


4,879 65 


12,384 27 


1868 


18,477 37 


4,154 33 


14,353 04 


1869 


19,883 95 


5.031 92 


14,8.-)2 03 


1870 


26,220 69 


6,708 37 


19,512 32 


1871 


18,026 74 


7,234 80 


10,791 94 


1872 


21,865 72 


7.108 76 


14,756 96 


1873 


23,069 60 


6,721 72 


16,347 83 


1874 


25,429 00 


9,978 71 


15,450 29 


1875 


27,871 67 


7,446 53 


20,425 14 



6 

To account for the extraordinary receipts or expenditures in cer- 
tain years, the following facts should be considered. In 1836 the city 
paid for building a barn at the farm, $1,391.23; and for an addition 
to the almshouse, $4,021.77. 

In 1818, the city paid for additional land for the poor farm, 

$826.12. 

In 1850, $4,985.85 was paid for building mid repairs. 

In 1851, $4,031.97 was paid for building and repairs, and 
$590.00 for land. 

In 1853, the city paid for land, $1,363.71; received for land 
$341.13. 

In 1855, the city received for land, $341.45. 
In 1858, the city received for land, $1,114.68. 
In 1859, the city received for land, $610.50. 
In 1860, the city received for land, $1,085.26. 
In 1861, the city received for land, $915.88. 

In 1862, the city paid tor re-building barns destroyed hy fire, 
$6,521.26. 

In 1870, the city paid for hou&e for the chaplain and teacher of 
Eeform School, $2,415.86; and also paid for Pest House, $2,472.34. 

In 1ST 4, the city received from Framingham and Lowell Railroad 
Company, for land damages and interest, $2,186.28. 

The demands of the poor on our municipal treasury have recently 
baen increased by two separate causes. First : the depression in busi- 
ness has turned hundreds out of employment who have hitherto earned 
their own means of subsistence. Second: the General Court has, by 
the act of 1874, for the more efficient relief of the poor, settled, upon 
the several cities and towns where they then had their domicil, nearly 
all who had previously been supported, as State Paupers, by the Com- 
monwealth. This act has made the greatest change in our settlement 
laws which has for many years been attempted; and the justice of 
transferring to special localities burdens heretofore shared by the whole 
State, is not apparent. 



The second section of the act gives a settlement to any woman of 
the age of twenty-one Tears, who resides in any place for five consecu- 
tive years, without receiving aid; and it presents a difficulty in admin- 
istration not easily under? tood by those unacquainted with the Pauper 
Laws. Many applicants are so uneducated that it is nearly impossible, 
when they reside in the cities and large towns, to trace them for five 
years with any degree of certainty ; and they themselves are frequently 
unable to decide within a year or two how long they have lived in any 
place, being so much accustomed to move about. 

To a certain extent this act defeats its own object, by depriving 
many who are the most entitled to them, of its advantages. The 
respectable poor widow, or other lone woman, who has filled its require- 
ments, by living five or more years in any place, but who has during 
that time been aided to a small amount, is thereby cut off from gaining 
a settlement ; while those who have led a vicious, wanton or drunken 
life, if they have only been able to provide for themselves for the five 
years, have the full benefit of the law, and are entitled to be supported 
by the municipality wherein they reside. In the case of the widow or 
other lone woman, if they cannot sujpoit themselves, they must now be 
sent away to the State Aims-House. There being no municipal records 
whereby it can be shown feu- a certainty how long females have lived 
in any town, this law is likely to be a fruitful source of litigation be- 
tween different towns, and will make more difficult of adjustment than 
ever, the Pauper Laws of this State, which were far from satisfactory 
before. 

The number of families having legal settlements in Lowell, that 
have received aid from the city during this year, has been 358 ; and 
the amount received by them has been $4,128.48. 

Forty-five families having legal settlements in other cities and 
owns have been aided during the year at the expense of the places 
where they have settlements, to the amount of $1,211.21. 

The average cost per head per week for the support of persons in 
the Institutions is $1.78x1. 



ALMS HOUSE AND POOR FARM. 



During the first years of our town history, our paupers were 
comparatively few in number, and were boarded at the almshouses of 
other towns, at au agreed price per head. But the expediency of pro- 
viding a separate Poor Farm and Alms House for the paupers of Lowell 
was suggested in town meeting at an early day. At a town meeting 
in March, 1830, it was "voted to choose a committee of five in number, 
whose duty it shall be to inquire into all the facts relative to the neces- 
sity of purchasing a farm for the aforesaid purpose, the number and 
condition of the permanent poor at this time, and what will be the 
probable increase annually ; to report their doings to the town at the 
next town meeting in May; and Samuel Bachelder, Jonathan Tyler, 
Joshua Swan, Artemas Young and James Tyler were chosen by nom- 
ination." 

At the town meeting in March, 1832, at the request of the Over- 
seers of the Poor, on motion of Warren Colburn, the town voted to 
choose a committee of five in number, to take the subject of purchasing 
a farm for the poor into consideration, and report thereon to the town 
at an adjourned meeting to be hoi den on the first Monday of April ; 
and Benjamin Walker, Elisha Huntington, Oliver M. Whipple, James 
Tyler and Luther Lawrence were chosen by nomination.* 

At the April meeting, this committee reported that it was ex- 
pedient, that the town purchase not less than ten acres of land, when 
it can be had at a reasonable price, and that suitable buildings be 
erected thereon for the accommodation of the poor. 

*See the Report of this Committee, Town Book, pp. 123, 163. 



9 

At the town meeting in March, 1835, on motion of Luther Emer- 
son, it was " voted to grant six thousand dollars for the purpose of 
erecting a Poor House. 

In the following April, the town voted to grant a further sum of 
eight thousand dollars toward the payment of dehts contracted for the 
purchase of a Poor Farm, and other purposes. 

The farm contains ahout one hundred and twenty acres, and has 
been greatly improved by successive superintendents. It was origin- 
ally much larger, but was reduced by the sale of a portion of it in 
1855, and again in 1858, when about seventy-one acres were dis- 
posed of. 



WORK HOUSE. 



The laws of Massachusetts have for many years provided that "a 
city or town may erect or provide a workhouse or almshouse for the 
employment and support of poor and indigent persons who are main- 
tained hy or receive alms from the city or town; persons who, being 
able of body to work and not having estate or means otherwise to 
maintain themselves, refuse or neglect to work ; persons who live a dis- 
solute, vagrant life, and exercise no ordinary calling or lawful busi- 
ness ; persons who spend their time and property in public houses to 
the neglect of their proper business, or who, by otherwise misspending 
what they earn to the impoverishment of themselves and their families, 
are likely to become chargeable to the city or town ; and other persons 
sent thereto under any provisions of law." * 

On February 26th, 1850, the City Council passed a resolution 
" that the buildings and lands known as the Almshouse and the farm 
attached to the same, and all the lands and commons belonging to the 
City of Lowell, be deemed and declared to be established as the Work 
House of the City of Lowell. 

After a few years, opposition to this institution arose, and on No- 
vember 22nd, 1859, a resolution discontinuing the workhouse was 
passed by the City Council. But the necessit3 r of such an institution 
as this was too great to be unheeded, and on July 9th, 1872, the City 
Council resolved : " That the buildings and lands known as the Low- 
ell Almshouse, and the farm attached thereto, be deemed and declared 
to be established as the Work House of the City of Lowell." 

♦General Statutes, chap. 22, sec. 1. 



REFORM SCHOOL. 



To Lowell belongs the honor of having established the first local 
" Eeform School " in Massachusetts. As early as 1844, the City Coun- 
cil petitioned the General Court for authority to establish a House of 
Reformation for Juvenile Offenders. The agitation then begun was 
continued until a general law was passed authorizing the several cities 
in the Commonwealth to establish such schools. 

The following " Act concerning Juvenile Offenders in the City of 
Lowell," was approved by the Governor March 26th, 1845 : 

Section 1. The City Council of the City of Lowell, is hereby 
authorized to erect a building in said city for the reception, instruction, 
employment, and reformation of such juvenile offenders as are herein- 
after named ; or to use, for these purposes, the Almshouse in said city, 
or any other house or building belonging to said city, that the City 
Council may appropriate to these uses. 

Sect. 2. The Overseers of the Poor of said city, or such other 
persons as said City Council shall appoint directors of said House for the 
Employment and Reformation of Juvenile Offenders, shall have power, 
at their discretion, to receive and take into said house all such children 
resident at, or belonging to said city, who shall be convicted of crimi- 
nal offences, or taken up and committed under and by virtue of the 
fifth and sixth sections of the one hundred forty-third chapter of the 
Revised Statutes of this Commonwealth ; and who may, in the judg- 
ment of any justice of the Supreme Judicial Court, or of the Court of 
Common Pleas, # sitting within and for the county of Middlesex, or of 

* Now Superior Court. 



12 

the justice of the Police Court within and for said city, be proper ob- 
jects therefor ; and upon the conviction or commitment aforesaid of any- 
such child, in the judgment of any such justice, a proper object for the 
said House of Employment and Reformation, the said justice, previously 
to declaring the sentence of the law on such child, shall cause notice to 
be given to the directors of the said house, and in case the said direc- 
tors shall declare their assent to the admission of such child into said 
house, the said justice shall sentence him or her to be committed to 
said House of Employment and Reformation, subject to the control of 
the directors thereof in conformity with the provisions of this act. 

Sect. 3. Any justice of either of the said Courts respectively, on 
the application of the Mayor or any Alderman of the City of Lowell, 
or of any director of the House of Reformation, or of any Overseer of 
the Poor of said cit}', shall have power to sentence to said House of 
Employment and Reformation all children resident in or belonging to 
said city who live an idle or dissolute life, whose parents are dead, or, 
if living, from drunkenness or other vices neglect to provide any suita- 
ble employment, or exercise any salutary control over said children. 
And the persons thus committed shall be kept, governed, and disposed 
of as hereinafter provided, — the males till the}^ are of the age of twenty- 
one years, and the females of eighteen years. 

Sect. 4. The Overseers of the Poor of said city, or such other 
persons as said City Council may appoint directors of the institution 
authorized by this act, may receive the persons sentenced and com- 
mitted as aforesaid, into said institution; and they shall have power to 
place the persons committed to their care, — the males until they ar- 
rive at the age of twenty-one years, and the females until they arrive 
at the age of eighteen years, — at such employments, and to cause them 
to be instructed in such branches of useful knowledge, as shall be suit- 
able to their years and capacity ; and they shall have power to bind 
out said minors, as apprentices or servants, until they arrive at the 
ages aforesaid, to such persons and at such places to learn such arts, 
trades, and employments as in their judgment will, be most for the 
reformation, amendment, and future benefit and adA^antage of such 
minors. And the provisions of the eightieth chapter of the Revised 



13 

Statutes of this Commonwealth (except the second section of said 
chapter) are hereby adopted as parts of this act, hut the overseers or 
directors, specified in this act, shall have all the powers, and be subject 
to all the duties of the overseers and selectmen, as set forth in said 
chapter; and the master or mistress, and the servant and apprentice 
bound out as aforesaid, shall have all the rights and privileges, and be 
subject to all the duties, set forth in the aforesaid chapter (except as 
aforesaid) . 

Sect. 5. Whenever said overseers or directors shall deem it ex- 
pedient to discharge any minor committed to their charge as aforesaid, 
and not bound out as a servant or apprentice, and shall recommend the 
same in writing to the court by which said minor was committed, said 
court shall have power to discharge him or her from the imprisonment 
or custody aforesaid. 

Sect. 6. Either of the said justices, on t\\e application of either 
of the persons mentioned in the third section of this act, shall have 
power to order the transfer of any child committed to the common 
Jail or the House of Correction, and inmates of the same, at the time 
of the passing of this act, and belonging to, or having their residence 
in said city, to the said House for the Employment and Refoimation of 
Juvenile Offenders, to be received, kept, or bound out by the directors 
thereof, in conformity with the provisions of this act. 

[Approved by the Governor, March 26, 1845.] 

The "Act concerning truant children and absentees from school," 
passed by the General Court in 1850, need not be recited here ; but the 
second ordinance passed by the City Council of 1851, " concerning 
truant children and absentees from school," must not be omitted. It 
is as follows : 

Section. 1. The City of Lowell hereby adopts the two hundred 
and ninety-fourth chapter of v the laws of the Commonwealth for the year 
eighteen hundred and fifty, entitled "An act concerning truant chil- 
dren and absentees from school." and avails itself of the provisions of 
said act. 

Sect. 2. Every child in the City of Lowell, between the ages of 



14 

six and fifteen years, who shall be an habitual truant from school, shall 
be punished by a fine not exceeding twenty dollars, to be recovered to 
the use of the City of Lowell, on complaint before the Police Court in 
Lowell, or by confinement in the House for the Employment and Refor- 
mation of Juvenile Offenders in said city, not exceeding one year at any 
one time. 

Sect. 3. , Every child in the City of Lowell, between the ages of 
six and fifteen years who shall not attend school, and not be engaged 
in any regular and lawful occupation, growing up in ignorance, shall 
be punished by a fine not exceeding twenty dollars, to be recovered 
to the use of the City of Lowell, on complaint before the Police Court 
in said Lowell, or by confinement in the House for the Employment and 
Reformation of Juvenile Offenders in said City, not exceeding one year 
at any one time. 

Sect. 4. The house for the reception, instruction, employment 
and reformation of juvenile offenders connected with the almshouse 
in said Lowell, is hereby assigned and provided as the institution of 
instruction, house of reformation, and suitable situation mentioned in 
said act ; and the said house is hereby appropriated for the " institution 
of instruction and house of reformation " for said truant children and 
absentees from school, and the said house is also appropriated for the 
reception, instruction, employment and reformation of Juvenile Of- 
fenders. 

Sect. 5. The Police Court in Lowell shall have jurisdiction of 
all cases under this ordinance. 

Sect. 6. The ordinance passed on the twenty-fifth day of Feb- 
ruary in the year eighteen hundred and fifty-one, entitled " An ordi- 
nance concerning truant children and absentees from school," shall be, 
and the same is hereby repealed. 

The foregoing ordinance was approved by the Court of Common 
Pleas in December, 1851. 

In 1852, the General Court passed the following act in addition to 
the preceding act : — 



15 

In addition to the authority given hy the act entitled " An Act 
concerning Juvenile Offenders in the City of Lowell," passed in the 
year one thousand eight hundred and forty-five, to the courts in said 
act named, said courts may sentence Juvenile Offenders, resident in 
said Lowell to the Lowell Institution for the Reformation of Juvenile 
Offenders, in the same manner, and for the same causes and time, and 
upon the same conditions for and upon which Juvenile Offenders may, 
hy the one hundred and sixty-fifth chapter of the acts of the year one 
thousand eight hundred and forty-seven, he sentenced to the State 
Reform School. 

[Approved by the Governor, May 20, 1852.J 

In 1873, the General Court passed the following " Act concerning 
truant children and absentees from school :" — 

Section 1. Each city and town shall make all needful provis- 
ions and arrangements concerning habitual truants and children be- 
tween the ages of seven and fifteen years who may be found wander- 
ing about in the streets or public places of such city or town, having 
no lawful occupation or business, not attending shool, and growing up 
in ignorance, and shall also, make such by-laws as shall be most con- 
ducive to the welfare of such children, and to the good order of such 
city or town ; and shall provide suitable places for the confinement, 
discipline and instruction of such children : provided, that said by-laws 
shall be approved by the superior court, or a justice thereof, or by the 
judge of probate of the county. 

Sect. 2. The school committee of the several cities and towns 
shall appoint and fix the compensation of two or more suitable persons, 
to be designated as truant officers, who shall, under the direction of 
said committee, inquire into all cases arising under such by-laws, and 
shall alone be authorized, in case of violation thereof, to make complaint 
and carry into execution the judgment thereon. 

Sect. 3. Any minor convicted under such by-law of being an 
habitual truant, or of wandering about in the streets and public places 
of any city or town, having no lawful employment or business, not at- 
tending school and growing up in ignorance, shall be committed to any 
institution of instruction or suitable situation provided for the purpose 



16 

under the authority of section one, of this act or by law, for such time, 
not exceeding two years, as the justice or court having jurisdiction may 
determine. Any minor so committed may, upon proof of amendment, 
or for other sufficient cause shown upon a hearing of the case, be dis- 
charged by such justice or court. 

Sect. 4. Justices of police or district courts, trial justices, trial 
justices of Juvenile Offenders, and judges of probate, shall have juris- 
diction within their respective counties, of the offences described in 
this act. 

Sect. 5. When three or more cities or towns in any county shall 
so require, the county commissioners shall establish at convenient 
places therein, other than the jail or house of correction, at the expense 
of the county, truant schools, for the confinement, discipline and in- 
struction of minor children convicted under the provisions of this act, 
and shall make suitable provisions for the government and control of 
said schools, and for the appointment of proper teachers and officers 
thereof. 

Skct. 6. Any city or town may assign any such truant school as 
the place of confinement, discipline and instruction for persons con- 
victed under the provisions of tins act; ar.d shall pay such sum for the 
support of those committed thereto as the county commissioners shall 
determine, not exceeding the rate of two dollars per week for each 
person. 

Sect. 7. Any city or town may, with the assent of the board of 
state charities, assign the state primary school at Manson as the place 
of confinement, discipline and instruction for persons convicted under 
the provisions of this act^ instead of the truant schools heretofore men- 
tioned; and shall pay for the support of such pei'sons committed 
thereto, such sum as the inspectors of said school shall determine, not 
exceeding two dollars per week for each person. Any minor so com- 
mitted, may upon satisfactory proof of amendment, or for other suffi- 
cient cause, be discharged by the board of state charities. 

Sect. 8. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 2, 1873. 



17 

Soon after the passage of the foregoing act, the City Council 
passed the following " Ordinance concerning truant children and ab- 
sentees from school : " — 

Section 1. The City of Lowell hereby adopts chapter two hun- 
dred and sixty-two of the laws of the Commonwealth, for the year 
eighteen hundred and seventy-three, entitled "An act concerning 
truant children and absentees from school." 

Sect. 2. Any minor convicted of being an habitual truant, or 
any child between the agss of seven and fifteen years who shall, on 
complaint, before any justice or court having jurisdiction, be convicted 
of wandering about in the streets and public places of the City of Low- 
ell, having no lawful employment or business, not attending school and 
growing up in ignorance, shall be committed to the " Institution and 
Instruction and House of Reformation" in said city, not exceeding two 
years, as the justice or court may determine. 

Sect. 3. The House for the Reception, Instruction, Employment 
and Reformation of Juvenile Offenders, connected with the Almshouse 
in said city, is hereby assigned and provided as the place of confine- 
ment, discipline, and instruction of the persons mentioned in said 
cb apter. 

Sect. 4. Cb apter thirty-two of the ordinances of the City of 
Lowell, passed October 28, 1863,* is hereby repealed, provided that 

such repeal shall not affect any action commenced under the same 
previous to the passage of this Ordinance. 

Believing it desirable that the methods practiced in this school 
should be more extensively known, we quote the following account of 
it from the pen of Nathan Allen, LL.D. 

" The City Council of 1850 authorized the Board of Overseers of the 
Poor to erect a brick building eighty feet long, thirty-six feet wide 
and three stories high, and appropriated $5,000 for this purpose. 
This building was not intended, in its arrangements, exclusively for a 
school, but to relieve, in pait, at that time, the crowded state of the 
city almshouse. It contains a chapel, school-room, work-room, dining- 

*This Ordinance of 1863, being no longer in force, is omitted here, as well as the Act of the 
General Court of that year, which was accepted by the city by said Ordinance. 



18 

room, and sleeping-room for the boys. On one side of it, surrounded 
by a high fence, is a yard, which is used as a play-ground, where the 
boys are permitted to enjoy their recreations under the eye of their 
teacher. This building stands about six feet from the alms-house, 
making the communication by an ell very convenient between the two 
establishments. All the provisions for the boys are included in the regular 
supplies for the almshouse, and cooked there, and then carried into the 
boy's dining-room. The boys have scarcely any intercourse with the 
regular inmates of the almshouse — only occasionally in their work, and 
living on the same premises. Whatever objection may arise from this 
connection is more in the name than in the reality. These boys attend 
school five hours each day — divided into two sessions — and the re- 
mainder of their time is devoted to labor or amusement. Their princi- 
pal employment, in warm weather, consists in tending the garden, 
gathering vegetables and fruit, and performing other light work on the 
farm ; and, in cold weather, in picking over beans for traders dealing 
in that article, and in doing such other light in-door labor as can be 
procured for them. The earnings of the boys cannot be exactly stated, 
but, it is estimated, will amount to from $300 to $500 each year. The 
school is divided into six classes. The text-books are the same as are 
generally used in Primary schools. Occasionally boys are sent here 
eight and ten years of age, who have never attended school at all, and 
do not even know their letters. The whole number in this Reform 
School varies from year to year, averaging from twenty-five to thirty- 
seven boys. At the present time the number is about forty. The ages 
of these boys vary from six to fifteen (with an average of eleven) 
years : the great majority of them are ten, eleven and twelve years of 
age. They are sentenced to this school by the Police Court, gener- 
ally for the following mentioned misdemeanors, corresponding in num- 
bers to the order here given : truancy, larceny, stubbornness and disobe- 
dience to parents, driving off teams standing in the streets, defacing 
school-houses, stealing fruit, assault and battery, etc., etc. The term 
of sentence in a majority of cases is six months or one year, and some- 
times two years, but for some slight offenses it is only three or four 
months. It is very seldom any boy leaves the establishment without 



19 

serving out his full time. The pardoning out of boys from such institu- 
tions has generally a demoralizing influence. Says the Superinten- 
dent: ' I feel warranted in saying that those are most benefited who 
stay longest in the institution, without any hopes of pardon or release, 
except such as are founded on meritorious advancement.' 

The discipline of the school, while it is kind and considerate 

i 
is also strict. The rules and regulations, established by the Board 

of Overseers of the Poor, forbid all corporal punishment. A careful 
record is kept of every punishment — what it was, and for what it was 
inflicted. There are three modes of punishing: the most common one is 
to deprive the offender of one or two meals, and the next is to shut up the 
boy in a cell from one to three days. The standard of the school is 
'perfect order and perfect lessons.' The following-named offenses are 
reported as followed by punishment or confinement in the cell : telling 
falsehoods, using profane language, disobedience of orders, stubbornness, 
and absconding, which seems to be the most grave of any offenses. 
These cells are made of plank throughout — three and one half feet 
wide, seven and one half feet long, and eight feet high — well ventila- 
ted and imperfectly lighted. This mode of punishment comprises 
only about one-fifth of all, which, during the last two years, ranged 
from seventy to ninety cases. The loss of one meal would seem, to 
some persons, a very slight punishment, but still it is a corrective 
which has a great influence, for boys at this age, taking considerable 
exercise in the open air, generally have a keen appetite and make 
much of their meals. A strong moral influence is also brought to bear 
in aid of the discipline of the school. Religious exercises are held by 
the chaplain every Sunday, after which all the children are gathered 
as a Sabbath school, and taught in separate classes. Instruction in 
the catechism, recitations of passages of scripture, singing etc., etc., 
comprise these exercises. All the scholars are required to take part. 
Besides, they have access to a small library of good books and the 
reading of many religious papers designed for children. This moral 
influence is also brought to bear on the scholars more or less during 
the week, and is clearly manifest in their deportment in the school- 
room as well as at their meals. There can be no permanent reform in 



20 

the members of such an institution without decided moral influences, 
and it is for the want of this very power that so many fail of any im- 
provement. 

The sanitary condition of the school has been remarkably good. 
There has never been much sickness among the scholars, and no severe 
epidemic has ever prevailed, and, what is most remakable, for fifteen years, 
among, probably, four hundred different boys sentenced here, only two 
have died on the premises. The well ventilated rooms, the plain, 
wholesome food, the regular hours of sleep and meals, the great variety 
of exercise and recreation in the open air, are all peculiarly calculated 
to promote good health. 

In one respect this school has been unusually fortunate — that is 
in having had one teacher from almost its commencement, viz — Mr. 
William A. Lang. He not only acts as teacher in the schoolroom, but 
hai charge of the boys in their work — in their amusements — at their 
meals — in their Sabbath exercises, and at all other times. It is just 
to state that he has discharged his duties with great fidelity and suc- 
cess. Mr. Phelps, the superintendent of the Almshouse, is also charg- 
ed by its regulations with the oversight of this establishment, and in 
one of his reports to the Overseers makes this statement, which should 
awaken an interest in our citizens to visit the institution : ' On the whole 
I think this School, in all the elements of useful progress, strict disci- 
pline, good deportment, attention to study, prompt recitations, and 
steady advancement in knowledge, will compare favorably with any 
public school, composed of the same class of pupils in the city, and I 
earnestly desire that persons who feel an interest in the welfare of the 
rising generation, should visit the school more frequently, and by their 
presence, at least, lend their aid and encouragement in effecting their 
thorough reformation.' 

The question naturally arises, What has been the effect upon the 
boys trained in this school ? The printed report statss that about 
one-half of the boys leave the institution decidedly improved ; some 
of its members enlisted in the army, and others are engaged in business 
and filling places of trust and usefulness. Still there is another class who 
appear to have received no benefit from their confinement and in- 



21 

struction "here. One fact is noticeable — it is seldom that any boy is sen- 
tenced there a second time. But probably the greatest benefit of the 

school is outside of its walls. It operates as a powerful barrier in our 
■city to check vice and crime among the j oung. The habit of truancy 
from school — which is a most pernicious evil among that class of lads — 
has been in a great measure broken up. Another important fact — com- 
paratively few young persons have been sent of late years from Iiowell 
to the House of Correction at Cambridge, whereas formerly the number 
was very large. Then, the expense of supporting this school is com- 
paratively small — estimated at about $1.50 per week for each pupil 
during the last two years, and this includes not only board, but cloth- 
ing, instruction, fuel, lights, bedding, etc." 

The teachers of this school have been Eliza Herrick, Charlotte 
Vinal, and William A. Lang, the present teacher, whose services as 
teacher have been uninterrupted since 1861, and who has evinced 
peculiar qualifications for the place. 

For some months after the establishment of the Reform School, 
public worship was conducted here by the several clergymen of the 
city alternately. The first appointed Chaplain was the Rev. Horatio 
Wood, Minister at Large. His successors have been Thomas Howarth, 
Thomas Simpson, George A. Putnam, William Christie, Thomas 
Leland, Charles Wilder, James Dean, and, since 1865, William A. 
Lang. 

By the Revised Charter, recently adopted, section 30, it is " the 
duty of the School Committee to exercise the same supervision and control 
over any institution of instruction and house of reformation, established 
by the City Council, as they are by law required to exercise over the 
public schools, as far as practicable." 

It is manifestly desirable that the Board specially charged with 
the management of the public schools, should have direct official con- 
nection with this institution ; and the Overseers of the Poor are happy 
to have the School Committee share the responsibilities heretofore borne 
by this Board alone. To prevent any differences in the future, the two 
Boards, on December 27th, 1875, passed, unanimously, the following 
preamble and resolution : 



22 

"Whereas the teacher of the House of Reformation has the care 
and government of the pupils out of school hours as well as in school, 
and the salary of said teacher is charged to the appropriations for the 
poor and not to the appropriations for schools ; therefore, 

Resolved, That, in the opinion of this Board,, the School Commit- 
tee will have performed the duties imposed upon them hy section SO of 
the Revised City Charter, when they have visited said School, pre- 
scribed the studies to be pursued and the text-books to be used 
therein ; and that the teacher should be employed, and his salary fixed, 
by the Overseers of the Poor, as heretofore." 

All that the projectors of the Reform School predicted for it, has 
been more than realized. The experience of this school has proved, as 
Dr. Allen observed, that " it is the education of the intellect, the 
formation of industrious, virtuous habits, and the inculcation of right 
moral sentiments, that produce a permanent reformation of the young. 
The jail and the house of correction are too often the gateways to- 
greater vices and darker crimes." The attention of the Board of State 
Charities was attracted to this School, and a favorable comparison was 
made, in that Board's Report for 1865, between this School and the 
State Reform School at Westborough, where the expense for each pupil 
was more than twice as great as here. 

Other municipalities have sought and obtained for their truants 
the benefits of this establishment — Chelsea, Somerville, Lynn, Win- 
chester, Woburn, Waltham, Lexington, and various other towns in 
this State. Following the wise example of our City Council, New 
Bedford, Cambridge, Newburyport, Worcester, Salem, Springfield and 
Lawrence have established similar schools. 

The number of inmates in these institutions, December 31st, 
1875, was 142 — males 103 ; females 39. They were thus distributed : — 
Almshouse, males 61 ; females 25 ; total 86. Workhouse, males 7 ; 
females 12 ; total 19. Reform School, males 35 ; females 2 j total 37. 

The superintendents of these institutions have been Joseph Pease, 
Amos Hull, Luther Eames, Isaac Day, ( who held the position eight 
years,) Benjamin Wilde, John Pry, Bickford Lang, ( who held the 
position eight years,) and Lorenzo Phelps, the present efficient incum- 
bent, who succeeded Mr. Lang in 1860. 



INSANE HOSPITAL, 



We would call attention to the expediency and necessity of estab- 
lishing another institution at the City Farm — a hospital for the harm- 
less and incurably insane. The average number of insane persons 
belonging to Lowell is about fifty, or one to each thousand of our 
population. About one half of these are cared for in the Almshouse, 
and the other half at the hospitals in Worcester, Taunton and North- 
ampton. The tendency of medical thought in our times is strongly in 
favor of small hospitals and against those large gatherings of the in- 
sane which once were favored; and we are satisfied that the time has 
come when Lowell should have a hospital of her own for certain classes 
of her insane. 

The money annually paid out of the City Treasury for the support 
of insane persons in the State Lunatic Hospitals, would pay the 
interest on the capital required to build a City Hospital suitable to our 
local needs, and leave a liberal sum to defray the cost of its main- 
tenance ; notwithstanding one-half our insane are already supported 
at the City Farm. 

THE AMOUNTS PAID BY THE CITY OF LOWELL TO WORCESTER, TAUNTON AND NORTHAMPTON 
LUNATIC HOSPITALS, DURING THE LAST FIVE YEARS, HAVE BEEN AS FOLLOWS. 



1871 


Worcester Hospital, 


$2,248 18 


1873 


Taunton Hospital, 


$1,421 57 


1872 


" 


3,011 25 


1874 


" 


1,645 26 


1873 


" 


2.784 36 


1875 




826 89 


1874 


K 


3,122 86 








1875 




3,436 47 


1871 

1872 


Northampton Hospital 


89 28 

248 92 


1871 


Taunton Hospital, 


255 63 


1875 


« 


190 03 


1872 


<< 


721 98 









Total paid in five years, . . . . ' . . $20, 002 68. 



24 

AMOUNTS REOEIVED BY THE CITT OF LOWELL FROM RELATIVES AND FRIENDS OF THOSE 
COMMITTED TO THE THREE HOSPITALS, TO WIT. 

In 1871, $> 43 85> 

]n 1872 201 05- 

In 1873, ..... 651 14 

In 1874, 459 18 

In 1875, 7. 400 03 

Total received in five years, $1,755 25- 

In addition to these considerations of economy, the crowded con- 
dition of the several State Lunatic Hospitals ought to have great 
weight. %u the late Report of the Commissioners of Lunacy, it is 
stated " that each institution has one-third more inmates than it 
was ever intended to accommodate, or can, comfortably or decently,, 
provide with rooms and beds. This crowded state of the hospitals in- 
terferes seriously with the cure and proper treatment of the insane,, 
particularly with acute cases. When it is considered that the recovery 
of some patients may, by this pressure and confusion, be prevented,, 
and the maladies, physical and mental, of others, be greatly aggra- 
vated, language cannot describe the amount or extent of the injury 
thus inflicted." 

The extravagant expenditures to which these large establishments- 
lead has become too manifest, of late, in the new hospital on Haw- 
thorne Hill in Danvers, the cost of which would, it is said, have " given 
every inmate a house worth at least three thousand dollars, with a 
marble mantel, open grate, well, pump and other conveniences. And 
this for public paupers, at a time when honest, hard-working men and 
women are daily being sold out of house and home because they cannot 
pay the interest and taxes due on their humble dwellings which cost 
far le&» than three thousand dollars." 



SMALL POX HOSPITAL. 



On Feburary 28th, 1870, the Board of Overseers of the Poor 
"voted that the Committee on Repairs provide a suitable Pest House 
for Small Pox Cases." This structure had scarcely been completed 
when the extraordinary prevalence of small pox pioved its extreme 
necessity. In view of this fact, on September 24, 1871, the Overseers 
of the Poor voted to transfer the management and entire charge of 
this Hospital to the Board of Health — then lately reconstituted and 
consisting of Aldermen Frederick Ayer and Henry C. Howe and 
Councilmen Benjamin Walker, H. C. Church, and Abel T. Atherton. 

On the disappearance of the small pox the Board of Overseers 
resumed the management of this establishment, and now make use of 
it for general hospital purposes. 

The personal property at these Institutions has been appraised by 
a Commitee of this Board, at $14,416,09 ; while the real estate con- 
nected therewith cannot be of less value than $25,000. 



HISTORY OF THE BOARD. 



During the four first years of our town history, the functions of 
Overseers of the Poor seem to have been performed by the Select- 
men ; and these were as follows : — 

1826, Nathaniel Wright, Samuel Batchelder and Oliver M. 
Whipple. 

1827, Nathaniel Wright, Joshua Swan and Henry Cohurn, Jr. 

1828, Nathaniel Wright, Joshua Swan and Artemas Young. 

1829, Nathaniel Wright, Joshua Swan and Artemas Young. 

The town meeting held March 1st, 1830, "voted to choose a 
board of overseers of the poor for the ensuing year, to consist of three 
in number ; and Oliver M. Whipple, Elisha Huntington and Benjamin 
Walker were chosen by ballot." * The same gentlemen were elected 
as Overseers of the Poor in 1831 and 1832. The Selectmen for those 
years were as follows : — 

1830, Joshua Swan, Artemas Young and James Tyler. 

1831, Joshua Swan, Artemas Young and James Tyler. 

1832, Joshua Swan, Matthias Parkhurst, Josiah Crosby, Benjamin 
Walker and S. C. Oliver. t 

The town meeting held in March, 1833, "voted to choose a board 
of five gentlemen to officiate as Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor 
for the ensuing year," and Joshua Swan, Matthias Parkhurst, Benjamin 
Walker and Elisha Huntington were chosen. 

* Town Records, p. 64. 

f Charles Cowley's History of Lowell, p. 166. 



27 

The town records show no later election of Overseers of the Poor, 
eo nomine ; and during the remaining years of our town history, the 
functions of this Board were performed by the Selectmen, who were 
as follows ; 

1834, Joshua Swan, Elisha Huntington, William Livingston, 
Jesse Fox and Benjamin Walker. 

1835, Benjamin Walker, James Russell, William Livingston, 
John Chase and William M. Owen. 

1836, Benjamin Walker, James Russell, William Livingston 
John Chase and William M. Owen. 

By the City Charter, which took effect, April 1st, 1836, all the 
powers of Overseers of the Poor were vested in the Mayor and Alder- 
men. 

This provision continued in force till 1838, and the following 
named gentlemen, who constituted the Board of Mayor and Aldermen 
during the years named, performed, ex virtute officii, the functions 
of Overseers of the Poor : — 

1836, Mayor, Elisha Bartlett ; Aldermen, Seth Ames, Aaron 
Mansur, Benjamin Walker, Oliver M. Whipple, Alexander Wright, 
William Austin and Joseph Tapley. 

1837, Mayor, Elisha Bartlett; Aldermen, Seth Ames, John 
Aiken, Seth Chellis, Joseph G. Kittredge, Joshua Swan and Alexan- 
der Wright. 

183S, Mayor. Luther Lawrence ; Aldermen, Benjamin E. French, 
Charles L. Tilden, Oliver M. Whipple, George H. Carleton, George 
Brownell, and Seth Chellis. 

In 1838, the City Charter was amended in this particular, and 
from that year to the present this Board has consisted of the Mayor, 
two Aldermen, and six Common Councilmen, elected annually. 

During the thirty-seven years since this provision took effect, 
this Board has been constituted as follows : — 

1838, Mayor, Luther Lawrence ; Aldermen, Benjamin F. French 
and Oliver M. Whipple ; Councilmen, Eliphalet Brown, Henry J, 



28 

Baxter, Elisha Huntington, Benjamin Walker, Benjamin Wilde, 
James L. Foot. 

1839, Mayor, Luther Lawrence, who died in April, and Elisha 
Huntington; Aldermen, Benjamin F. French and George H. Carleton; 
Councilmen, Eliphalet Brown, Jefferson Bancroft, Elisha Huntington, 
Benjamin Walker, Benjamin Wilde, Thomas L. Randlett. 

1840, Mayor, Elisha Huntington ; Aldermen, Jonathan Tyler and 
Harlin Pillshury ; Councilmen, Sylvanus Adams, Jefferson Bancroft, 
Samuel Burbank, Edward F. Watson, George Dane, John L. Fitts. 

1841, Mayor, Elisha Huntington ; Aldermen, George H. Carle- 
ton and Jefferson Bancroft ; Councilmen, George Bragdon, Jonathan 
White, Nathaniel Critchett, William Livingston, Phineas Whiting, 
John Smith. 

1842, Mayor, Nathaniel Wright ; Aldermen, William Livingston 
and Cyril French ; Councilmen, Edward J. Payne, John Nesmith, 
John Mead, Josiah B. French, Boswell Douglass, Varnum A. Shed. 

1843, Mayor, Nathaniel Wright ; Aldermen, Cyril French and 
Sidney Spaulding ; Councilmen, Edward J. Payne, Henry J. Baxter, 
John Mead, William Carlton, James Patterson, Sewall G. Mack. 

1844, Mayor, Elisha Huntington ; Alderman, Selwin Bancroft 
and Henry Smith ; Councilmen, David Healy, Amos Merriam, Isaac 
Scripture, Charles H. Wilder, David Bradt, Gilman Gale. 

1845, Mayor, Elisha Huntington ; Aldermen, Henry Smith and 
Selwin Bancroft; Councilmen, Gilman N. Nichols, Daniel Balch, 
Isaac Scripture, Charles H. Wilder, Nathaniel Wright, Jr., John B. 
McAlvin. 

1846, Mayor, Jefferson Bancroft ; Aldermen, Henry Smith and 
Selwin Bancroft ; Councilmen, Danforth T. Brigham, William Brown, 
Isaac Farrington, David J. Moody, Charles M. Short, John L. Fitts. 

1847, Mayor, Jefferson Bancroft ; Aldermen, Elisha Huntington 
and Sewall G. Mack ; Councilmen, Jesse Huse, Samuel W. Brown, 
Isaac Farrington, Stephen A. Cohurn, Charles M. Short, Thomas 
Wentworth. 



29 

1848, Mayor, Jefferson Bancroft;"; Aldermen, David Dana and 
Erastus Douglass ; Councilmen, Jesse Huse, John Nesmith, Ransom 
Heed, Otis Allen, Charles M. Short, Thomas Wentworth. 

1849, Mayor, Josiah B. French ; Aldermen, James H. B. Ayer 
and Daniel Carter ; Councilmen, * Jesse Huse, Ambrose Lawrence, 
Elisha Davis, Ezekiel Wright, Maynard Bragg, William Lamson, Jr, 

1850, Mayor, Josiah B. French ; Aldermen, James H. B. Ayer 
and Josiah G. Peahody ; Councilmen, Daniel R. Kimball, George 
Gardner, Fordyce Coburn, Benjamin Goddard, Maynard Bragg, f Wil- 
liam Lamson, Jr. 

1851, Mayor, James H. B. Ayer; Alderman, William North and 
Joshua Converse ; Councilmen, Jonathan Smothers, Samuel J, Varney, 
Fordyce Coburn, Benjamin Goddard, George T. Elliot, Albert Mallard. 

1852, Mayor. Elisha Huntington ; Aldermen, William North and 
Samuel J. Varney ; Councilmen, John C. Smith, Milton Bonney, 
William Twichell, Holland Streeter, Jonathan Kendall, Leonard W. 
Jaquith. 

1853, Mayor, Sewall G. Mack ; Aldermen, Elisha Huntington 
and Stephen Mansur ; Councilmen, John C. Smith, Milton Bonney, 
Calvin Philbrick, Joseph S. Grush, George W. Patterson, William C. 
Parker. 

1854, Mayor, Sewall G. Mack ; Aldermen, Elisha Huntington 
and Samuel K. Hutchinson ; Councilmen, John C. Smith, George W. 
Stanley, Calvin Philbrick, Joseph S. Grush, Patrick Conlan, Charles 
S. Eastman. 

1855, Mayor, Ambrose Lawrence ; Aldermen, William Fiske and 
Artemas L. Brooks ; Councilmen, Maynard Bragg, William G. Morse, 
Theodore Warren, Francis H. Nourse, Oliver T. Rand, James M. 
Moore. 

1856, Mayor, Elisha Huntington ; Aldermen, Edward Tuck and 
Charles H. Wilder ; Councilmen, Enos 0. Kingsley, Peter Flanders, 
Jr., Peter Powers, Francis H. Nourse, Isaac Place, Jonathan P. 
Folsom. 

* Resigned ; Gerry Wilson, electd March 6th. 
t Resigned; Albert Mallard elected June 25th. 



30 

1857, Mayor, Stephen Mansur; Aldermen, Francis H. Nourse 
and Jonathan Smothers ; Councilman, Charles A. Welch, William D. 
Vinal, David Kogers, John C. Jepson, William Goodale, Eobert J. 
Garrett. 

1858, Mayor, Elisha Huntington ; Aldermen, Sewall G. Mack 
and Samuel W. Stictney ; Councilmen, Charles Wilkins, Edward 
Tuck, Joseph A. Brahrook, Zephamiah Goward, Samuel T. Manahan, 
Erastus Boyden. 

1859, Mayor, James Cook; Aldermen, Jonathan P. Folsom and 
Samuel J. Varney; Councilmen, Charles Wilkins, David Nichols, 
Asahel D. Puffer, George W. Partridge, William Goodale, Ebenezer 
Burgess. 

1860, Mayor, Benjamin C. Sargeant ; Aldermen, Samuel T. Mana- 
han and William G. Morse ; Councilmen, Benjamin S. Ireson, Joseph 
L. Sargent, Hocum Hosforcl, George W. Partridge, George F. Morey 
Samuel T. Lancaster. 

1861, Mayor, Benjamin C. Sargeant; Aldermen, Samuel T. 
Manahan and Hocum Hosford; Councilmen, Jacob Baron, Henry S. 
Orange, George W. Norris, Morrill M. Bohonan, George F. Morey, 
Samuel T. Lancaster. 

1862, Mayor, Hocum Hosford; Aldermen, Aldis L. Waite and 
Mertoun C. Bryant; Councilmen, Charles F. Hard, Henry S. Orange, 
George W. Norris, Hubbard Willson. Albert Mallard, Elon A. Sanborn. 

1863, Mayor, Hocum Hosford; Aldermen, William Nichols and 
Isaac F. Scripture ; Councilmen, Charles F. Hard, Henry S. Orange, 
Everett W. Erench, Josiah Gates, Cyrus H. Latham, Benedict 0. 
Carpenter. 

1864, Mayor, Hocum Hosford; Aldermen, Cyrus H. Latham 
and George W. Norris ; Councilmen, John Cosgrove, Artemas S. 
Young, Charles .W Dodge, Artwell F. Wright, Thomas G. Gerrish, 
Levi Sprague. 

1865, Mayor, Josiah G. Peabody ; Aldermen, George W. Norris and 
Josiah Gates ; Councilmen, Lewis L. Perrin, Julian V. Keyes, Charles 
W. Dodge, Francis Jewett, Charles Hubbard, Tobias L. P. Lamson. 



31 

1866, Mayor, Josiah G. Peabody ; Aldermen, Charles W, Dodge 
and Josiah Gates; Councilmen, Jacob Baron, Julian V. Keyes, 
Edward C. Rice, Benjamin L. Googins, Jonathan Johnson, Luke C. 
Dodge. 

1867, Mayor, George F. Richardson ; Aldermen, Hocum Hosford 
and Charles B. Coburn ; Councilmeji, Major G. Perkins, William 
Dobbins, Frederick T. North, Alfred Scott, George L. Huntoon, Alfred 
H. Chase. 

1868, Mayor, George F. Bichardson; Aldermen, Charles B. 
■Coburn and Albion J. Dudley; Councilmen, John Shepard, Puel 
J. Walker, Albert A. Haggett, John Q. A. Hubbard, George S. 
Cheney, James Lawton. 

1869, Mayor, Jonathan P. Folsom ; Aldermen, Henry H. Wilder 
and George S. Cheney; Councilmen, Benjamin Patch, Joseph A. 
Patten, William Walker, Epaphras A. Hill, Edwin Lamson, Francis 
Brown. 

1870, Mayor, Jonathan P. Folsom ; Aldermen, Charles A. Stott 
and John Q. A. Hubbard; Councilmen, Patrick Keyes, Phineas Jones, 
Henry P. Perkins, Simon G. Lyford, Willard A. Brown, Alpha B. 
Farr. 

1871, Mayor, Edward F. Sherman ; Aldermen, Amos B. French 
and Albert A. Haggett ; Councilmen, John H. Durgin, Jr., Patrick 
Cummiskey, Horace Ela, Michael Corbett, Jeremiah Crowley, John 
Stott. 

1872, Mayor, Josiah G. Peabody; Aldermen, Gustavus A. Gerry 
and Alpha B. Farr; Councilmen, Southwell Farrington, Amos A. 
Blancharcl, Horace Ela. Alonzo L. Russell, Crawford Burnham, 
Nathaniel C. Sanborn. 

1873, Mayor, Francis Jewett ; Aldermen, Alpha B. Farr and 
Jonathan P. Folsom ; Councilmen, Alonzo F. Caswell, Joseph S. 
Brown, * Charles F. Tilton, Nathaniel P. Favor, Charles F. Belden, 
Samuel M. Chase. 

*Besigned; William Bass elected April 8th. 



32 

1874, Mayor, Francis Jewett; Aldermen, Jeremiah Crowley and 
Joseph S. Brown ; Councilmen, Stephen J. Smiley, Edward P. Woods, 
James Owens, Julian A. Richardson, Jared P. Maxfield, Jason Puller. 

1875, Mayor, Prancis Jewett ; Aldermen, James Owens and 
Joseph S. Brown; Councilmen, Charles A. Welch, Leavitt P. J. 
Varnum, Charles Cowley, Edward Stockman, John B. Lyford, Jason 
Fuller. 

Upon the expiration of the present year, the constitution of the 
Board undergoes another change, the advantages of which are too 
obvious to require discussion. The Revised Charter of the City, 
section 29, provides that. : — 

" The Overseers of the Poor shall consist of the Mayor and six 
other persons, who shall be elected by the concurrent vote of the City 
Council, and shall be sworn to the faithful discharge of their duties. 
In January in the year eighteen hundred and seventy-six, three of 
the said persons ^hall be elected to serve for one year, and three to 
serve for two years, and thereafter, in January of each year, three of 
the said persons shall be elected to serve for two years. In case of a 
vacancy in the Board of Overseers of the Poor, from any cause, the 
City Council shall fill such vacancy by electing a person to serve for 
the remainder of the term ; and all Overseers of the Poor shall serve 
until their successors are chosen and qualified. The Overseers of the 
Poor may appoint a secretary and define his duties ; but the compen- 
sation of such a secretary shall be fixed by the City Council. Said 
Overseers shall have all the powers heretofore conferred upon th e 
Overseers of the Poor of the City of Lowell, by any special act, and all 
the powers of Overseers of the Poor in towns, but shall receive no 
compensation for their services except by vote of the City Council." 



OF THE SETTLEMENT OF PAUPERS. 



[Chapter 69 of General Statutes.] 

Section 1. Legal settlements may be acquired in any city or 
town, so as to oblige such place to relieve and support the persons 
acquiring the same, in case they are poor and stand in need of relief, 
in the manner following, and not otherwise, namely: 

First. A married woman shall follow, and have the settlement of 
her husband, if he has any within the State; otherwise her own at the 
time of marriage, if she then had any, shall not be lost or suspended 
by the marriage. 

Second. Legitimate children shall follow and have the settle- 
ment of their father if he has any within the State, until they gain a 
settlement of their own ; but if he has none, they shall in like manner 
follow and have the settlement of their mother, if she has any. 

Third. Illegitimate children shall follow, and have the settle- 
ment of their mother at the time of their birth, if she then has any 
Within the State ; but neither legitimate nor illegitimate children shall 
gain a settlement by birth in the place where they may be born, if 
neither of their parents then has a settlement therein. 

Fourth., Any person of the age of twenty-one years, being a 
citizen of this or any other of the United States, and having an estate 
of inheritance or freehold in any place within the State and living on 
the same three years successively, shall thereby gain a settlement in 
such place. 



34 

Fifth. Any person of the age of twenty-one years, being a citizen 
of this or any other of the United States, and having an estate, the 
principal of which shall he set at two hundred dollars, or the income at 
twelve dollars, in the valuation of estates made by assessors, and being 
assessed for the same, to State, County, city, or town taxes for five 
years successively in the place where he dwells and has his home, shall 
thereby gain a settlement therein. 

Sixth. Any person being chosen and actually serving one whole 
year in the office of clerk, treasurer, selectman, overseer of the poor, 
assessor, constable, or collector of taxes, in any place, shall thereby gain 
a settlement therein. For this purpose a year shall be considered as 
including the time between the choice of such officers at one annual 
meeting and the choice at the next annual meeting, whether more or 
less than a calendar year. 

Seventh. Every settled ordained minister of the gospel shall be 
deemed to have acquired a legal settlement in the place wherein he is 
or may be settled as a minister. 

Eighth. Any person admitted an inhabitant by any place at a 
legal meeting held under a warrant, containing an article for that pur- 
pose, shall thereby acquire a legal settlement therein. 

Ninth. Any citizen of this or any other of the United States, 
dwelling and having his home in any unincorporated place at the time 
it is incorporated into a town, shall thereby, acquire a legal settlement 
therein. 

Tenth. Upon the division of a city or town, every person having 
a legal settlement therein, but being absent at the time of such divi- 
sion, and not having acquired a legal settlement elsewhere, shall have 
his legal settlement in that place wherein his last dwelling-place or 
home happens to fall upon such division ; and when a new city or town 
is incorporated, composed of a part of one or more incorporated places, 
every person legally settled in the places of which such new city or 
town is so composed, and who actually dwells and has his home within 
the bounds of such new city or town at the time of its incorporation, 
shall thereby acquire a legal settlement in such new place: provided, 



35 

that no person residing in that part of a place which upon such division 
shall he incorporated into a new city or town, having then no legal 
settlement therein, shall acquire any by force of such incorporation 
only ; nor shall such incorporation prevent his acquiring a settlement 
therein, within the time and by the means by which he would Lave 
gained it there if no such division had been made. 

Eleventh. A minor who serves an apprenticeship to a lawful 
trade for the space of four years in any place, and actually sets up such 
trade therein within one year after the expiration of said term, being 
then twenty-one years old, and continues there to carry on the same 
for five years, shall thereby gain a settlement in such place ; but 
being hired as a journeyman shall not be considered as setting up a 
trade. 

Twelfth. Any person of the age of twenty-one years, being a 
citizen of this or any other of the United States, who resides in any 
place within this State for ten j^ears together, and pays all State, 
County, city or town taxes, duly assessed on his poll or estate for any 
five years within said time, shall thereby gain a settlement in such 
place. 

Sect. 2. No person who has begun to acquire a settlement by 
the laws in force at and before the time when this chapter takes effect, 
in any of the ways in which any time is prescribed for a residence, or 
for the continuance or succession of any other act, shall be prevented 
or delayed by the provisions of this chapter; but he shall acquire a set- 
tlement by a continuance or succession of the same residence, or other 
act in the same time and manner, as if the former laws had continued 
in force. 

Sect. 3. Every legal settlement shall continue till it is lost or 
defeated, by acquiring a new one within this State ; and upon acquir- 
ing such new settlement all former settlements shall be defeated and 
lost. 

[Chapter 328 oe 1868.] 
an" act in relation to the settlement op paupers. 

Be it enacted, &c., as follows : 



36 

Section 1. Hereafter, any person of the age of twenty-one 
years, having the other qualifications mentioned in the fourth, fifth, 
ninth and twelfth clauses of the first section of chapter sixty-nine of 
the General Statutes, shall he deemed to have thereby gained a settle- 
ment as therein provided, although not a citizen of this or any other of 
the United States. 

Sect. 2. If any person actually become' chargeable as a pauper 
to any city or town in which he has a settlement, has a settlement sub- 
sequently acquired in any place without this Commonwealth, the 
Overseers of the Poor of such city or town may cause him to be 
removed to said place of subsequent settlement, by a written order 
directed to any person therein designated who may execute the same. 

[Approved June 9, 1868.] 

[Chapter 392 of 1870.] 

an act concerning the settlement of paupers. 
Be it enacted, &c, as follows : 

Section 1. [Repealed.] 

Sect. 2. All settlements acquired by virtue of any provision of 
law in force prior to the eleventh day of February, in the year one 
thousand seven hundred and ninety-four, except where the existence 
of such settlement prevented a subsequent acquisition, are hereby 
declared defeated and lost. 

Sect. 3. Any person who shall have been duly enlisted and 
mustered into the military or naval service of the United States as a 
part of the quota of any city or town in this Commonwealth, under any 
call of the President of the United States, during the recent civil war, 
and who shall have continued in such service for a term not less than 
one year, or who shall have died, or become disabled from wounds or 
disease received or contracted while engaged in such service, or while 
a prisoner in the hands of the enemy, and the wife or widow and minor 
children of such person, shall be deemed thereby to have acquired a 
settlement in such city or town. 

Sect. 4. The provisions of the preceding section shall not apply 
to any person who shall have enlisted and received a bounty for such 



37 

enlistment in more than one town, unless the second enlistment was 
made after an honorable discharge from the first term of se/vice, nor 
to any person who shall Hiave been proved guilty of wilful desertion, or 
to have left tbe service otherwise than by reason of disability or an 
honorable discharge. 

Sect. 5. Any person who would otherwise be entitled to a settle- 
ment under section three of this act, but who was not a part of the 
quota of any city or town, shall, if he served as a part of the quota of 
this Commonwealth, be deemed to have acquired a settlemeait in the 
city or town where he actually" resided at the time of his enlistment. 

[Approved June 22, 1870.] 

[Chapter 274 or 1874.] 

Asr Act for the more efficient Belief of the Poor. 
Be it enacted, &c, as fallows : 

Section 1. Any person of the age of twenty-one years who 
resides in any place within this State for five years together and pays 
all State, County, city or town taxes duly assessed on his poll or estate 
for any three years within that time shall thereby gain a settlement in 
such place. 

Sect. 2. Any woman of the age of twenty-one years who resides 
in any place within this State for five years together without receiving 
relief as a pauper shall thereby gain a settlement in such place. The 
first section of the three hundred and ninety-second chapter of the acts 
of eighteen hundred and seventy is hereby repealed. 

Sect. 3. No existing settlement shall be changed by any provi- 
sion of this act unless the entire residence and taxation herein 
required accrues after its passage ; but any unsettled person shall be 
deemed to have gained a settlement upon the completion of the resi- 
dence and taxation herein required, though the whole or a part of the 
same accrues before the passage of this act. 

Sect. 4. The provisions of this act shall not apply to any person 
who at the date of its passage is an inmate of either of the State lu- 
natic hospitals, the asylum for the insane or the State almshouse at 



38 



Tewksbury, the State workhouse, or the State primary school, until 
such persRn has been duly discharged from said institution, 
[Approved May 28, 1874. 



OPINION OF THE ATTOBNEY GENEBAL ON THE NEW 
PAUPEK LAW OF 1874. 

The Board of State Charities asked the Attorney General of the 
Commonwealth for an interpretation of the first claus'e of the second 
section of this law. His response was as follows : 

Attorney General's Office, 

Boston, September 19, 1874. 
To the Board of State Charities : 

Prior to Acts of 1870, chapter 392, an unmarried womnn could 
obtain a settlement only under the provisions of the General Statutes, 
chapter 69. By the Act of 1870, " any unmarried woman " obtained 
a settlement by a residence of ten years together, in any place under 
certain conditions. By chapter 274, section 2, of the Acts of 1874, 
section 1 of chapter 392, Acts of 1870, is repealed, and a new provision 
substituted. The substitute changes the law of 1870 in three particu- 
lars ; the effect of one only is material for me to consider under the 
question submitted by your Board for my opinion. In the Act of 1874? 
the word "unmarried" is omitted. The plain and obvious intention of 
the Legislature by this change of the law, is to so arrange the law of 
settlement as that women shall have the same rights irrespective of 
any condition of marriage. The language of the Act, taken in con- 
nection with the Act repealed, does not allow of any other construction, 
and the intention of the Legislature, if it can be ascertained, is to 
govern. In the present instance, the omission of the word "unmar- 
ried," and the use of the word " woman " only makes it appear mani- 
festly to have been the intention of the Legislature to use the word 
" woman " in the Act, so as not to be affected or modified by the con- 
dition of marriage ; and in my opinion, no other construction can be 
given the act. The intention of the Legislature being manifest, no 
consideration of presumption can arise. 

Yours very respectively, 

CHAELES E. TEAIN. 



39 

[Chapter 70 of General Statutes ] 

OF THE SUPPORT OF PAUPERS BY CITIES AND TOWNS. 

Section 1. Towns to support poor. 2. Powers and duties of over- 
seers of the poor. 3. Same subject. 4. Certain kindred to support , 
&c. 5. Superior Court may assess such kindred. 6. May also assess 
for future expenses. 7. Costs, how taxed. 8. Court may order with 
whom pauper shall live. 9. Proceedings on complaints. 10. Other 
kindred than those named may be summoned. 11. Court may make 
new orders. 12. Overseers to provide for immediate relief of stran- 
gers, &c. 13. Recovery to establish settlement. 14. Liability when 
pauper removed, &c. 15. Overseers shall support and in case of de- 
cease, bury indigent strangers. Compensation therefor. 16. Towns 
liable to individuals. 17. Paupers maybe removed, &c. 18. Process 
in case of removal ; if a removal is not made or objected to by the 
town notified, then, &c. 19. Effects of notifications, &c, sent by mail. 
20. Penalty for leaving paupers where not settled, &c 21. Overseers 
of poor may sell estate of deceased paupers, and apply proceeds to 
reimburse expenses. 22. Overseers may prosecute, &c. 

Section. 1. Every city and town shall relieve and support all 
poor and indigent persons lawfully settled therein, whenever they stand 
in need thereof. 

Sect. 2. The Overseers of the Poor shall have the care and over- 
sight of all such poor and indigent persons so long as they remain at 
the charge of their respective cities or towns, and they shall see that 
they are suitably relieved, supported and employed, either in the work- 
house or almshouse, or in such other manner as the city or town 
directs, or otherwise at the discretion of said overseers. They may 
remove to the almshouse such children as are suffering destitution from 
extreme neglect of dissolute or intemperate parents or guardians. 

Sect. 3. The Overseers of the poor shall have the same power 
and authority over persons placed under their care, which directors or 
masters of workhouses have over persons committed thereto. 

Sect. 4. The kindred of such poor persons, in the line or degree 
of father or grandfather, mother or grandmother, children or grand- 
children, by consanguinity, living in this State and of sufficient ability, 
shall be bound to support such paupers, in proportion to their respec- 
tive ability. 



40 

Sect. 5. The superior court in the county where any one of sucfj 
kindred to be charged resides, upon complaint of any city, town, or 
kindred who shall have been at expense for the relief and support of 
such pauper, may on due hearing, assess and apportion upon such of 
the kindred as they shall find to be of sufficient ability, and, in propor- 
tion thereto, such sum as they shall deem reasonable for or toward the 
support of the pauper at the time of such assessment ; and may enforce 
payment thereof by execution in common form j provided, that such 
assessment shall not extend to any expense for lelief afforded more 
than six months previous to the filing of the complaint. 

Sect. 6. The court may further assess and apportion upon said 
kindred such weekly sum as they shall deem sufficient for the future 
support of the pauper, to be paid quarter yearly until further order of 
court ; and upon application from time to time of the city, town, or 
kindred, to whom the same is ordered to be paid, the clerk of said 
court shall issue and may renew an execution for the arrears of any 
preceding quarter. 

Sect. 7. When the court adjudges two or more of the kindred 
of a pauper to be of sufficient ability A o contribute to his support, they 
shall tax no more costs against any one respondent than is occasioned 
by his default or separate defence. 

Sect. 8. The court may further order with whom of such kin- 
dred, that may desire it, such pauper shall live and be relieved, and 
such time with one, and such time with another, as they shall deem 
proper, having regard to the comfort of the pauper as well as the con- 
venience of the kindred. 

Sect. 9. The complaint made as provided in this chapter, shall 
be filed in the Clerk's office, and a summons shall be thereupon issued 
requiring the kindred therein named to appear and answer thereto '■> 
which summons shall be directed to any officer qualified to serve civil 
process between the parties, and serve like an original summons, four- 
teen days at least before the sitting of the court to which it is re- 
turnable. 



41 

Sect. 10. Upon suggestion that there are other kindred of ability, 
not summoned in the original process, they may be summoned, and 
after due notice, whether they appear or are defaulted, the court may 
proceed against them in the same manner as if they had been sum- 
moned upon the original complaint. 

Sect. 11. The court may take further order from time to time 
in the premises, upon application of any party interested, and may 
alter such assessment and apportionment according to circumstances ; 
and upon all such complaints they may award costs to either party as 
justice requires. 

Sect. 12. Said overseers, in their respective places, shall provide 
for the immediate comfort and relief of all persons residing or found 
therein, having lawful settlements in other places, when they fall into 
distress and stand in need of immediate relief, and until they are re- 
moved to the place of their lawful settlements ; the expense whereof, 
incurred within three months next betore notice given to the place be 
charged, as also of their removal, or burial in case of their decease, 
may be recovered by the place incurring the same against the place 
liable therefor, in an action at law, to be instituted within two years 
after the cause of action arises, but not otherwise. 

Sect. 13. A recovery in such action shall bar the place 
against which it shall be had from disputing the settlement of such 
pauper with the place so recovering, in any future action brought for 
his support. 

Sect. 14. When a person is supported in a place other than 
that in which he has his settlement, the place liable for his support 
shall not be required to paj therefor more than at the rate of one dollar 
a week; provided, that the place so liable shall cause the pauper to be 
removed within thirty days from the time of receiving legal notice that 
such support has been furnished. 

Sect. 15. The overseers of the poor of each place shall also re- 
lieve, support, and employ, all poor persons residing or found therein, 
having no lawful settlements within this State, until their removal to 
a State almshouse, and in case of their decease shall decently bury 
them; the expense whereof may be recovered of their kindred, if they 



42 

have any chargeable by law for their support, in the manner herein 
before provided ; and if in case of their burial the expense thereof is 
not paid by such kindred, there shall be paid from the treasury of the 
commonwealth, ten dollars for the funeral expenses of each pauper 
over twelve years of age, and five dollars for the funeral expenses of 
each pauper under that age. 

Sect. 16. Every city and town shall be held to pay any expense 
necessarily incurred for the relief of a pauper therein by any person 
who is not liable by law for his support, after notice and request made 
to the overseers thereof, and until provision is made by them. 

Sect. 17. The overseers of an}^ place may send a written notifi- 
cation, stating the facts relating to any person actually become charge- 
able thereto, to one or more of the overseers of the place where his settle- 
ment is supposed to be, and requesting them to remove him, which they 
may do by a written order directed to any person therein designated, who 
may execute the same. 

Sect. 18. If such removal is not effected by the last mentioned 
overseers within two months after receiving the notice, they shall within 
said two months send to one or more of the overseers requesting such 
removal, a written answer, signed by one or more of them, stating 
therein their objections to the removal; and if they fail so to do, the 
overseers who requested the removal may cause the pauper to be re- 
moved to the place of his supposed settlement, by a written order di- 
rected to any person therein designated, who may execute the same ; 
and the overseers of the place to which the pauper is so sent, shall re- 
ceive and provide for him ; and such place shall be liable for the ex- 
penses of his support and removal, to be recovered in an action by the 
place incurring the same, and shall be barred from contesting the ques- 
tion of settlement with the plaintiff in such action. 

Sect. 19. The notification and answer mentioned in the two pre- 
ceding sections may be sent by mail ; and such notification or answer, di- 
rected to the overseers of the poor of the place intended to be notified 
or answered, postage prepaid, shall be deemed a sufficient notice or 
answer, and shall be considered as delivered to the overseers to whom 



43 

it is directed, at the time when it is received in the post office of the 
place to which it is directed and in which the overseers reside. 

Sect. 20. Whoever hrings into and leaves any poor and indi- 
gent person in any place in this state, wherein such pauper is not 
lawfully settled, knowing him to be poor and indigent, and with intent 
to charge such place with his relief or support, shall forfeit a sum not 
exceeding one hundred dollars for each offence, to he recovered in an 
action of tort to the use of such place. 

Sect. 21. Upon the death of a pauper who at the time of his dis- 
ease is actually chargeable to any place within this state, the overseers 
of the poor of such place may take possession of all his real and per- 
sonal property ; and if administration is not taken upon his estate 
within thirty days after his decease, the overseers may in their own 
names sell and convey so much thereof as may be necessary to repay 
the expenses incurred for the pauper. If any part of such property is 
withheld from said overseers, they may in their own names sue for and 
recover possession of the real estate, and shall have the same remedy 
for the recovery of the personal estate or its value, that an administra- 
tor might have in like case. 

Sect. 22. In all actions and prosecutions founded on the pre- 
ceding provisions of this chapter, the overseers of the poor of any place 
or any person by writing under their hands appointed shall appear, 
prosecute, or defend, the same to final judgement and execution, 
in behalf of such place. 

[Chapter 213 of 1873.] 
An Act to increase the compensation for support of Paupers before 

removal. 
Be it enacted, &c, as follows : 

Section fourteen of chapter seventy of the General Statutes is 
amended by striking out the words "one dollar," and inserting instead 
thereof the words " two dollars." [ Approved April 19, 1873. 

[Chapter 162 of 1865.] 
An act concerning the admission of Sick Persons to the State 
Almshouse. 



44 

Be it enacted, &c., as follows : 

Sect. 1. No city or town authorities shall be allowed to send to 
either of the State almshouses any person infected with small-pox or 
other disease dangerous to the public health, nor any other sick person 
whose health would be endangered by removal; but all such persons 
liable to be maintained by the commonwealth, shall be supported dur- 
ing such sickness by the city or town in which they are taken sick, 
.and notice of such sickness shall be given to the board of State Chari- 
ties, who shall have authority to examine the case, and order the re- 
moval of the patient if they deem expedient. 

Sect. 2. The expense incurred by any city or town under the 
provisions of the first section of this act, after notice shall have been 
given as therein required, and the bills for said support having 
been approved by the agent of the board of state charities, shall be re- 
imbursed by the commonwealth to an amount not exceeding at the 
rate of the average weekly cost of the support of similar patients at 
the Rainsford Island Hospital. 

Sect. 3. Any mayor or overseer of the poor who shall knowingly 
offend against the provisions of the first section of this act, shall be 
subject to a penalty of not less than fifty nor more than one hundred 
dollars. [Approved April 27, 1865. 

In conclusion, we are gratified in being able to attest that all the 
institutions committed to our charge, are fulfilling the purposes for 
which they were created in a creditable manner ; and we commend 
them, one # and all, to the fostering care of our successors, and of the 

citizens at large. 

FRANCIS JEWETT. 
JOSEPH S. BROWN. 
JAMES OWENS. 
CHARLES A. WELCH. 
LEAVITT R. J. VARNUM. 
CHARLES COWLEY. 
EDWARD STOCKMAN. 
JOHN B. LYFORD. 
JASON FULLER. 



RULES. 



Article I. The Board of Overseers of the Poor of the City of 
Lowell shall be organized in the month of January, each year. The 
Mayor of the City shall be, ex-officio, Chairman of the Board, and 
in his absence, a Chairman pro tern, shall be chosen. A Secretary 
shall be chosen by ballot. Before the transaction of any official 
business, each Overseer shall be qualified according to law, by taking 
the oath of office, which shall be administered by the Chairman. 
Four members shall constitute a quorum for the the transaction of 
business. 

Article II. There shall be appointed by the Chairman, at 
the first meeting of the Board, in January, the following Standing 
Committees, of three members each, viz : on Fuel and Out-door 
Relief; on Agriculture, Neat Cattle and Swine ; on Care and Repair 
of Buildings ; on Clothing, Bedding and Furniture ; and on Provis- 
ions and Supplies. 

Article III. It shall be the duty of the Secretary to make all 
such investigations as to the settlement of paupers as may be neces- 
sary ; to attend to their removal to or from the city ; and to inquire 
carefully into the condition and means of subsistence of all who 
apply for the city's charity. He shall visit the several Institutions 
at the City Farm at least once in each week, and oftener if the in- 
terests of the same require it. He shall attend all meetings of the 
Board, keep a record of all the votts and proceedings, and see that 
all regulations for the management of these Institutions are duly ob- 
served ; and he shall, annually, within the time prescribed by law, 



46 

make out the accounts against other towns and cities for assistance 
rendered paupers having a settlement therein, and against the Com- 
monwealth for the support of State Paupers unable to be removed 
to a State Almshouse, and for the burial of State paupers, and sub- 
mit the same to the Board. He shall keep an accurate account of 
all expenditures for out-door relief; and, in a book kept for that 
purpose, shall record all such facts relating to persons so relieved ?.s 
are important to be preserved. He shall, under the direction of the 
Board, make all contracts for wood and coal distributed outside of 
the Almshouse. In his absence, the Board shall choose a Secretary 
pro tern. 

Article IV. The regular meetings of the Board shall be held 
at the Almshouse on the last day of each month, unless that day 
shall come on Sunday, in which case the meeting shall be on the 
Saturday preceding. And the Chairman may call special meetings 
whenever it may be deemed necessary. 

Article V. The Board shall choose a Superintendent of the 
Institutions at the City Farm, at the last regular meeting in Decem- 
ber, annually, who shall enter upon the discharge of the duties of his 
office on the first Monday in January following. He shall have a 
salary, which shall be in full for his services and the service of the 
Matron, to be fixed at the time of his election. 

Article VI. It shall be the duty of the Superintendent to see 
that good order is preserved in and about the several Institutions 
committed to his charge, and see that all persons about the premises 
attend divine worship in the chapel on Sundays, when in a fit con- 
dition so to do. He shall c.iuse all persons under his charge whom 
the City Physician may decide to be in a fit condition to labor, to be 
diligently employed at such labor as the Board shall from time to 
time direct. He shall see that the buildings, furniture and all other 
property are kept in a proper and safe condition. He shall keep an 
accurate account, in a book or books provided for that purpose, ot 
all articles of personal property received upon the premises, of whom 
purchased, and the price paid therefor ; shall keep a correct roll of 
the time of all persons hired upon the premises, whether laborers 



47 

mechanics, overseers or teachers. He shall also keep an accurate 
account of all articles sold on the premises, with the name or names 
of the persons to whom sold, and the price paid therefor ; and shall 
render a true account thereof to the Board, quarterly, and oftener if 
required ; and said books shall be always opsn to the inspection of 
the Overseers, and of their Secretary. The Matron shall have an 
oversight of the children and female inmates, under the direction of 
the Superintendent. 

Article VII The City Physician shall keep a register of per- 
sons under his care in these Institutions, with minutes of their 
diseases, and shall furnish a copy thereof to the Board annually, 
stating the number of deaths and diseases which have been most 
prevalent, together with such observations as he may deem im- 
portant. 

Article VIII. No person admitted to these Institutions as an 
inmate, shall leave the enclosure without permission from the Super- 
intendent. Inmates who conduct themselves in a faithful, obedient 
and industrious manner, may have the privilege of visiting friends ; 
but, except in cases of sickness, not oftener than once a month, per- 
mission having first been obtained of the Superintendent. Should 
they conduct themselves with impropriety, this privilege will be 
withheld at the discretion of the Superintendent. 

Article IX. No persons will be allowed to visit any of these 
Institutions in a clandestine manner, but persons may, by leave of 
the Superintendent, or by a permit in writing from one of the Over- 
seers, or of the Secretary, be allowed to visit their friends once a 
month, and oftener in case of sickness. Visitors shall not be allowed 
to receive from, nor give to, any of the inmates any articles of any 
kind whatever, except with the knowledge and consent of the 
Superintendent. 

Article X. No person shall be allowed to visit the Institutions 
on Sunday without a permit from one of the Overseers, the Secre- 
tary, or the Superintendent. All persons are forbidden from bring- 
ing or drinking ardent spirits upon the premises without the 
direction of the attending Physician. 



Article XI. The teacher of the House of Reformation shall 
he elected, and his salary fixed, by the Board of Overseers at their 
last regular meeting in December, but no teacher shall be engaged 
without previously passing a satisfactory examination according to 
the laws of the Commonwealth and the rules of the School Commit- 
tee of the City of Lowell. At the same meeting a Chaplain shall be 
employed and his salary fixed. 

Article XII. Corporal punishment shall in no case be 
resorted to ; but any of the inmates may be confined in the cells 
made for that purpose, for insubordination to the regulations, disor- 
derly conduct, or for disobedience to the orders of the Master 
Matron, or any of the Overseers or teachers employed in any part of 
the premises. 



CITY OF LOWELL. 



In Board of Aldermen, December 28, 1875. 
The within rules for the government of the Institutions at the 
City Farm are approved ; sent down for concurrence. 

Samuel A. McPhetres, City Clerk. 

In City Council, December 28, 1875. 

Read and approved in concurrence. 

David Chase, Clerk. 
Approved December 30, 1875. 

Francis Jewett, Mayor. 



50 

OFFICERS 



INSTITUTIONS AT THE CITY FARM, 

Jfwi 1876. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR, 
MAYOR CHARLES A. STOTT, 

Chairman of the Board. 

MEMBERS, 

CHARLES COWLEY, | JOHN F. McEVOY, 

JOSIAH BUTLER, 

Whose terms expire on the first Monday of January, 1877. 

L. R. J. VARNUM, | N. C. SANBORN.* 

SULLIVAN L. WARD,| 

Whose terms expire on the first Monday of January, 1878. 

Secretary of the Board, 
FREDERICK HOLTON. 

Superintendent of the Institutions at the City Farm. 

LORENZO PHELPS. 

Matron.— Mrs. SARAH PHELPS. 

Teacher of the Reform School and Chaplain, 

WILLIAM A. LANG. 

*Elected to fill the place of J. P. Folsom, who declined. 

fElected to fill the place of Mr. Holton, who resigned his seat in the Board on being elected 
its Secretary. 



ACTS AND ORDINANCES 



RELATING TO THE 



LOWELL WATER WORKS 



WITH THE 



AGREEMENT FOR THE SETTLEMENT 



OF THE 



CLAIMS FOR DAMAGES 



SUSTAINED BY THE 



PROPRIETORS OF LOCKS AND CANALS 



ON MEREIMAOK RIVER AND 
OTHER CORPORATIONS. 



[Published by order of the City Council.] 



LOWELL, M4SS.: 

TIMES PUBLISHING CO., BOOK AND JOB PRINTERS, No. 12 MIDDLE STREET. 

1876. 



LEGISLATIVE ACTS FOR SUPPLYING 
LOWELL WITH WATER. 



The feasibility of increasing by artificial means the natural supply 
of water in the City of Lowell, had been the subject of public discus- 
sion for several years prior to 1855. In that year, the General Court 
passed the following "Act for supplying the City of Lowell with 
Water:"— 

Section 1. The City of Lowell is hereby authorized to take, 
hold, and convey into and through said city from the Merrimack 
River, at any point thereof within said city that may be deemed ex- 
pedient, sufficient water for the use of said city and the inhabitants 
thereof, for the extinguishment of fires, domestic and other purposes ; 
and may also take and hold, by purchase or otherwise, any lands or 
real estate within said city necessary for lajdng and maintaining 
aqueducts or pipes, constructing or maintaining reservoirs, and such 
other works as may be deemed necessary or proper for raising, forcing, 
retaining, distributing, discharging, or disposing of said water. 

Sect. 2. The City of Lowell shall, within sixty days from the 
time they shall take any lands for the purposes of this act, file in the 
office of the Registry of Deeds for the northern district of Middlesex, 
a description of the lands so taken, as certain as is required in a com- 
mon conveyance of lands, and a statement of the jmrposes for which 
they were taken, which description and statement shall be signed by 
the Mayor of said city. 



Sect. 3. The said city may make, build, lay down, and main- 
tain aqueducts and pipes from said Merrimack River into, through, and 
about said city ; construct and maintain reservoirs; and may make, 
erect, and maintain and carry on such other works as may be necessary 
or proper for raising the water into the same, and forcing and distribut- 
ing the water through and about said city ; may make and establish 
such public hydrants, in such places within said city, as may from time 
to time be deemed proper, and prescribe the purposes for which the 
same may be used, and may change or discontinue the same ; may distri- 
bute the water throughout the city, and for this purpose may lay down 
pipes to any house or building in said city, the owner or owners thereof 
having notice, and not objecting thereto; may regulate the use of said 
water, and establish, receive, and collect the prices or rents to be paid 
therefor ; and the said city may, for the purposes aforesaid, carry and 
conduct and maintain any aqueducts, pipes, or other works by them to 
be made, laid down, or conducted over, under, through, or across any 
watercourse, canal, street, bridge, railroad, highway, or other way, in 
such a manner as not to obstruct the travel or free use thereof; may 
enter upon and dig up any such road, street, or way, for the purpose of 
laying down pipes beneath the surface thereof, and for maintaining 
and repairing the same, and in general may do any other acts and 
things necessary or convenient and proper for carrying out the purposes 
of this act. 

Sect. 4. All pipes, aqueducts, and other work constructed or 
erected by said city by virtue of this act in, under, or over any of the 
canals of "The Proprietors of the Locks and Canals on Merrimack 
River," shall be so constructed, erected, and laid, as, when completed, 
not to obstruct the navigation in said canals, or either of them, or to 
interrupt or impede the flow of the water in the same. 

Sect. 5. The rights, powers, and authorities given to the city 
of Lowell by this act shall be exercised by the said City, subject to the 
restrictions, duties, and liabilities herein contained, in such manner 
and by such commissioners, officers, agents, and servants, as the City 
Council shall from time to time ordain, appoint, and direct. 



Sect. 6. For the purpose of defraying the expenses which may 
be incurred by the city of Lowell in carrying into effect the powers 
granted by this act, the said city of Lowell shall have authority, from 
time to time, to borrow such sum or sums of money, and to issue notes, 
scrip, or certificates of debt therefor, to such an amount as the City 
Council shall from time to iime deem expedient, bearing interest not 
exceeding the legal rate of interest in this Commonwealth; and the 
principal shall be made payable at periods not more than twenty years 
from the issuing of said notes, scrip, or certificates of debt, respectively; 
and the City Council may sell the same or any part thereof, from 
time to time, at public or private sale, or pledge the same for money 
borrowed for the purposes of this act, on such terms and conditions as 
the City Council shall judge proper. And the City Council of the said 
city is hereby authorized from time to time to appropriate, grant, and 
assess such sum or sums of money as shall be deemed expedient to- 
wards paying said expenses, or the principal of the money so borrowed 
or obtained, and the interest thereof, in the same manner as money is 
appropriated, granted, and assessed for other city purposes. 

Sect. 7. All persons and corporations who shall be damaged in 
their property by the taking of any lands or water, the building of 
reservoirs, aqueducts, or water works, or the laying of pipes, or in any 
other way in carrying into effect the powers hereby granted to the city 
of Lowell, unless the said city shall, within sixty days after request in 
writing made to the Mayor of said city, pay or tender to the person or 
corporation so damaged a reasonable compensation therefor, shall have 
the same remedies as are provided in the thirty-ninth chapter of the 
Revised Statutes for persons damaged by railroad corporations. 

Sect. 8. If any person wantonly or maliciously shall corrupt the 
water in, or destroy or injure any aqueduct, reservoir, pipe, conduit, 
hydrant, machine, or other works or property held, owned, or used by 
the said city of Lowell, by the authority and for the purposes of this 
act, every such person or persons shall forfeit and pay to the said city 
three times the amount of damages that shall be assessed therefor, to be 
recovered by any proper action ; and every such personor persons may, 



6 

moreover, on indictment for and conviction of either of the wanton or 
malicious acts aforesaid he punished hy fine not exceeding one thousand 
dollars, and imprisonment not exceeding one year. 

Sect. 9. Nothing in this act contained shall he so construed as 
to give to the City of Lowell the right to authorize the use, hy any 
other persons or corporations, of the water of Merrimack River taken 
under the provisions of this act, for mechanical or manufacturing pur- 
poses otherwise than for creating steam. 

Sect. 10. The Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Lowell shall 
notify and warn the legal voters of the said city to meet in their 
respective wards on such daj^s as the said Mayor and Aldermen shall 
direct, not exceeding sixty days after the passage of this act, for the 
purpose of giving their written votes upon the question whether they 
will accept the same. And if a majority of the votes so given upon 
the question aforesaid shall he in the negative, this act shall he null 
and void. 

Sect. 11. This act shall take effect from and after its passage. 
[ Approved by the Governor, May 21, 1855.] 

The foregoing act was accepted hy the citizens of Lowell, July 
16th, 1855. Eleven years later, in 1866, the General Court passed the 
following act in addition to the foregoing act : — 

Section 1. The commissioners authorized hy the fifth section 
of the four hundred and thirty-fifth chapter of the acts of the year 
eighteen hundred and fifty-five, shall not exceed three in number, and 
shall hold their offices for three years, unless the, work contemplated in 
said act shall he sooner completed. Said commissioners shall, during 
their continuance in office, execute, perform, superintend and direct 
the execution and performance of all works, matters and things men- 
tioned in said act, and in all other acts that may he passed relative to 
the same subject, and they shall ohey all ordinances, rules and regu- 
lations, in the execution of their said trust, as the City Council of 
Lowell may from time to time ordain and establish, not inconsistent 
with the provisions of said act, and shall once in six months, and 
whenever required hy the City Council, make and present in writing a 



particular report and statement of all their acts and proceedings, and of 
the condition and progress of the works aforesaid. A majority of said 
commissioners shall he a quorum for the exercise of the powers and the 
performance of the duties of the said office ; they may be removed by 
concurrent vote 01 two-thirds of each branch of the City Council, after 
having an opportunity to be heard in their defence ; and a vacancy oc- 
casioned hy death, resignation or removal, shall be filled in manner 
aforesaid, by the appointment of another commissioner, who shall hold 
his said office for the residue of the term of three years. 

Sect. 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 30, 1866.] 

In 1869, the General Court passed a second act in addition to the 
act of 1855, as follows : — 

Section 1. The City of Lowell is hereby authorized to take, hold 
and convey to, into and through the said city from Beaver Brook, so-called, 
in the town of Dracut, Long Pond, in Dracut, and Tyng's Pond, in 
Dracut and Tyngshorough, and the waters which flow into and from 
the same, sufficient water for the use of said city, and the inhabitants 
thereof, for the extinguishment of fires, creating steam, domestic and 
other purposes ; and may also take and hold, by purchase or otherwise, 
any lands or real estate necessary for laying and maintaining aqueducts 
or pipes for conducting, discharging, disposing of and distributing 
water, constructing and maintaining reservoirs, dams, and such other 
works as may he deemed necessary or proper for raising, forcing, re- 
taining, distributing, discharging or disposing of said water ; and may 
take and hold any land on and around said ponds and Beaver Brook, 
tor the purpose of raising water to such height as may he necessary for 
the purity and preservation of the same, and for the purpose of furnish- 
ing a supply of pure water for the said City of Lowell. 

Sect. 2. The City of Lowell shall, within sixty days from the 
time they shall take any lands, ponds or streams of water for the j>ur- 
poses of this act, file in the office of the Registry of Deeds for the 
northern district of Middlesex, a description of the lands, ponds, or 
streams of water so taken as certain as is required in a common con- 



veyance of lands, and a statement of the purposes for which they were 
taken, which description and statement shall he signed by the Mayor 
of said city. 

Sect. 3. The said city may make, build, lay down and maintain 
aqueducts and pipes from any of said sources to, into, through and 
about snid city, and secure and maintain the same by any works suita- 
ble therefor ; may connect said Tyng's Pond and Long Pond with each 
other; may erect and maintain dams to raise and retain the water 
taken ; may construct and maintain reservoirs within or without said 
city; and may make, erect and maintain and carry on such other works 
as may be necessary or proper for raising the water into the same, and 
forcing and distributing the water through and about said city; may 
make and establish such public fountains and hydrants in such places 
as may from time to time be deemed proper and prescribe the purposes 
for which the same may be used, and may change or discontinue the 
same ; may distribute the water throughout the city, and for this pur- 
pose may lay down pipes to any house or building in said city, the 
owner or owners thereof having notice, and not objecting thereto; may 
regulate the use of said water, within and without the said city, and 
establish, receive and collect the prices or rents to be paid therefor ; and 
the said city may, for the purposes aforesaid, carry and conduct and 
maintain any aqueducts, pipes or other works by them to be made, laid 
down or conducted over, under, through, or across any water-course? 
canal, street, bridge, railroad, highway, or other way, in such a manner 
as not to obstruct the travel or free use thereof; may enter upon and 
dig up any such road, street, or way for the purpose of laying down 
pipes beneath the surface thereof, and for maintaining and repairing 
the same, and in general may do any other acts and things necessary 
or convenient and proper for carrying out the purposes of this act. 

Sect. 4. All pipes, aqueducts, and other works constructed or 
erected by said city, by virtue of this act, in, under or over any of the 
canals of " The Proprietors of the Locks and Canals on Merrimack 
River," shall be so constructed, erected and laid, as, when completed, 
not to obstruct the navigation in said canals, or either of them, or to 
interrupt or impede the flow of the water in the same. 



9 

Sect. 5. The rights, powers and authorities given to the City of 
Lowell by this act, shall be exercised by the said city, subject to the 
restrictions, duties and liabilities, herein contained, in such manner and 
by such commissioners, officers, agents and servants as the City Council 
shall from time to time ordain, appoint and direct. 

Sect. 6. For the purposes of defraying the expenses which may 
be incurred by the City of Lowell in carrying into effect the powers 
granted by this act, the said City of Lowell shall have authority, from 
time to time, to borrow such sum or sums of money, and to issue notes, 
scrip or certificates of debt therefor, as the City Council of Lowell shall 
from time to time deem expedient, bearing interest not exceeding the 
rate of six per cent, per annum ; and the principal shall be made 
payable at periods not more than twenty years from the issuing of said 
notes, scrip, or certificates of debt, respectively ; and the City Council 
may sell the same or any part thereof, from time to time at public or 
private sale, or pledge the same for money borrowed for the purposes 
of this act, on such terms and conditions as the City Council shall judge 
proper. And the City Council of the said city is hereby authorized 
from time to time, to appropriate, grant and assess such sum or sums 
of money as shall be deemed expedient towards paying said expenses, 
or the principal of the money so borrowed or obtained, and the interest 
thereof, in the same manner as money is appropriated, granted and 
assessed for other city purposes. 

Sect. 7. All persons and corporations who shall be damaged in 
their property hy the taking of any lands or water, the building of 
reservoirs, aqueducts or water works, or the laying of pipes, or in any 
other way, in carrying into effect the powers hereby granted to the 
City of Lowell, unless the said city shall, within sixty days after request 
in writing made to the Mayor of said city, pay or tender to the person 
or corporation so damaged a reasonable compensation therefor, shall 
have the same remedies as are provided in the forty-third chapter of 
the General Statutes for persons damaged by the laying out of 
highways. 

Sect. 8. If any persons shall use any of the said water, either 
within or without said city, without the consent of said city, an action 



10 

of tort may be maintained by said city for tbe recovery of tbe damages 
sustained. 

Sect. 9. If any person wantonly or maliciously shall divert the 
water from, or corrupt the water in, or destroy or injure any aqueduct, 
reservoir, pipe, conduit, hydrant, machine, or other works or property 
held, owned or used by the said City of Lowell, by the authority and 
for the purposes of this act, ev( ry such person or persons shall forfeit 
and pay to the said city three times the amount of damages that shall 
be assessed therefor, to be recovered by any proper action ; and every 
such person or persons may, moreover, on indictment for, and convic- 
tion of either of the wanton or malicious acts aforesaid, be punished by 
fine, not exceeding one thousand dollars, and imprisonment not ex- 
ceeding one year. 

Sect. 10. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved June 4, 1869.] 

In 1869, a Joint Special Committee was appointed to consider the 
subject of the supply of water under the foregoing acts; and upon the 
recommendation of that Committee, the City Council passed the fol- 
lowing — 

Resolution to authorize the construction of Water Works in the 
City of Lowell. 

Resolved, By the Board of Aldermen, and Common Council of 
the City of Lowell, in City Council assembled, as follows : That a suf- 
ficient supply of pure water, for the use of the City of Lowell, be taken 
from Beaver Brook, in Dracut, and that the necessary works therefor 
be constructed in accordance with the recommendation of the Joint 
Special Committee on the supply of water, in their Report dated 
September 22nd, 1869, under the direction of three Commissioners to 
be hereafter chosen. 
[Passed October 12, 1869.] 

In 1870, the General Court passed a third act in addition to the 
act of 1855, as follows: — 

Section 1. The City of Lowell, for the purposes named in the 
first section of chapter three hundred and fifty-one of the acts of the 



11 

year eighteen hundred and sixty-nine, is hereby authorized to take 
water from the Merrimack River, in the town of Dracut, or said Lowell, 
and also to take and hold, by purchase or otherwise, land in said 
Dracut or Lowell, for sinking wells or making excavations, in order to 
obtain water by filtration or percolation, or from subterranean streams.- 
and for the construction of such works as may be necessary therefor, 
and for all other purposes for which said city might take or hold land 
under the provisions of said act, in case the water were taken from the 
sources in said act authorized. 

Sect. 2. Nothing in this act shall authorize the construction of 
any work which, when completed, shall obstruct the flow of the water 
of said river (not taken as herein authorized), to or from any water mill 
now existing in said Lowell. And in the event that under the author- 
ity of this act, water shall be taken from said river at any place above 
the dam of The Proprietors of the Locks and Canals on Merrimack 
River, nothing herein shall authorize the use of water so taken, as 
or for power for propelling or operating machinery, otherwise than as 
steam. 

Sect. 3. In the execution of the authority hereby granted, all 
the proceedings, rights, powers and liabilities shall, except as herein 
otherwise provided, be the same, and all persons and corporations, who 
shall be damaged in their property thereby, shall have the same 
remedies provided in said act of the year eighteen hundred and sixty- 
nine, in case the water were taken from the sources in said act au- 
thorized. 

Sect. 4 If any person wantonly or maliciously shall divert the 
water from, or corrupt the water in, or destroy or injure any aqueduct, 
reservoir, pipe, conduit, hydrant, machine or other works and property 
held, owned, or used by the said City of Lowell, by the authority and 
for the purposes of this act, every such person or persons shall forfeit 
and pay to the said city three times the amount of damages that shall 
be assessed therefor, to be recovered by any proper action ; and every 
such person or persons may, moreover, on indictment for, and convic- 
tion of, either of the wanton or malicious acts aforesaid, be punished 



12 

by fine not exceeding one thousand dollars, and imprisonment not ex- 
ceeding one year. 

Sect. 5. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved June 3. 1870.] 



ORDINANCES OF THE CITY COUNCIL 

CONCERNING THE WATER 

WORKS. 



On November 23d, 1869, the City Council passed " An Ordinance 
in Relation to Water Commissioners, and Water Works," as follows: 

Section 1. Whereas the City Council of the City of Lowell, 
on the 12th day of October, A. D. 1869, decided that they would 
introduce water into the citj r from Beaver Brook, # so called, in 
the town of Dracut, in accordance with the act of the Legislature, ap- 
proved June 4, A. D. 1869, entitled " An Act in addition to ' An Act 
for supplying the City of Lowell with Water,' " it is ordained and 
determined that water, for the purpose aforesaid, shall be introduced 
from said Beaver Brook. 

Sect. 2. For the purposes of carrying into effect the provisions 
of said act and for introducing a supply of water into said city, there 
shall be chosen, by the City Council, by concurrent vote, three Water 
Commissioners who shall be known and called bjr the name of " The 
Lowell Water Commissioners." Said Commissioners shall hold 
their offices for three years from and after the time of their election, 
unless the water works contemplated by said act shall be sooner com- 
pleted ; and in that case, until the completion of said works. Provided, 
however, that the City Council, by concurrent vote of two-thirds of the 
members elected to either Board voting in the affirmative, may remove 
said Commissioners, or any of them, from office, for any misconduct 

*See Ordinances passed July 26, 1870, and December 27, 1870. 



14 

unfaithful performance of duty, neglect, or incapacity. In case of a 
vacancy in the Board of Commissioners by death, resignation or re- 
moval, such vacancy shall he filled by the appointment of another 
Commissioner, in the manner provided for in this section, who shall 
hold his said office for the residue, of the said term of three years, with 
all the powers and subject to all the restrictions provided in this 
Ordinance. Said Commissioners are authorized to select one of their 
number to act as Chairman or President of the Board. Two Commis- 
sioners shall be a quorum for the exercise of the powers and performance 
of the duties of said office. 

Sect. 3. The Chairman or President of said Commissioners shall 
receive a salary of two thousand dollars per annum, and each of the 
other Commissioners a salary of one thousand dollars per annum, pay- 
able quarterly. 

Sect 4. Said Commissioners shall have authority to convey 
into and through said city the waters of said Beaver Brook* in accor- 
dance with the provisions of said act, and shall have and exercise all 
the powers conferred on said city by said act, and may take by pur- 
chase, or otherwise, the waters of said brook and any water rights 
connected therewith, and any real estate necessary for laying aque- 
ducts and forming reservoirs, and for any of the purposes of said act, 
and may also make contracts for labor and materials for the construc- 
tion of said water works, which shall be valid and binding on said 
city, and which may be suitable and proper for facilitating, expediting 
and finishing the works in the most speedy, economical, advantageous, 
permanent and effectual manner. 

Sect. 5. Whenever the Commissioners aforesaid shall take by 
purchase or otherwise any lands, streams of water, water rights or 
water sources for the purposes mentioned in said act, they shall, with- 
out unnecessary delay, make and deliver to the Mayor of the City of 
Lowell a certificate signed by them containii g a statement of the fact 
of such taking, and a description of the lands or water sources so 
taken, as certain as is required in a common conveyance of lands, and 
a statement of the purposes for which they are so taken, to the end 

* Sec Ordinances passed July 26, 1870, and December 27, 1870. 



15 

that the Mayor aforesaid may cause such description and statement, 
signed by him, to be filed in the office of the Registry of Deeds for the 
northern district of Middlesex, as required by the second section of 
said act. 

Sect. 6. All contracts for labor and materials in the prosecution 
of said work shall be in writing, and executed in triplicate, one of 
which triplicate shall be kept by the Commissioners, one shall be de- 
livered to the City Clerk, and one to the contractor, and no such con- 
tract shall be executed unless good and satisfactory security for the 
faithful performance of the same, and also to indemnify and save the 
city harmless from and against all claims against said city under 
Chapter one hundred and fifty of the General Statutes, by persons who 
may have done work or labor, in the construction, erection and pre- 
paration of said works at the request of such contractor, shall be given 
by the contractor and approved by the Commissioners. Said Commis- 
sioners, when not otherwise authorized by the City Council, shall ad- 
vertise in one or more newspapers in this city, and in such other cities' 
and places as they may think best, for sealed proposals for all such 
contracts, specifying the time and place where the same shall be 
received; and such proposals, in order to be received and acted upon, 
shall set forth a srjecified sum or price to be paid for all such labor or 
materials, or for either, without condition, limitation or alteration, and 
shall be accompanied with a bond satisfactory to the Commissioners, 
conditioned for the faithful execution of the proposal if the same shall 
be accepted ; and the contents of any proposal shall not be made known 
to any person not a member of the Commission until a contract shall 
have been made, provided that said Commissioners may in their dis- 
cretion reject any or all such proposals ; and no contract shall be as- 
signed without the written consen^ of said Commissioners. Nothing 
herein contained shall require said Commissioners to advertise for pro- 
posals for the ordinary extensions of street mains and water pipes, or 
repairs of the water works. Said Commissioners shall have power and 
authority to employ an engineer and such other agents, clerks and 
servants as they may deem necessary, and to agree with them for their 
compensation, which shall be paid out of the City Treasury. 



16 

Sect. 7. No one of said Commissioners, and no person appointed 
to any office or employed by virtue of this Ordinance, or by the afore- 
said act of the Legislature, shall be interested directly or indirectly in 
any bargain, contract, sale, or agreement in relation to said water 
works, or any matter or thing connected therewith, wherein the city is 
interested, without an express vote of the City Council ; and any and 
all contracts, bargains, sales, or agreements made in violation of this 
section shall be utterly void as to the city. 

Sect 8. It shall be the duty of the Commissioners aforesaid to ex- 
ercise all reasonable vigilance and care by personal inspection, examin- 
ation and supervision, from day to day, or from time to time, as cir- 
cumstances may require, of all matters and things herein committed to 
their charge ; to see that all works, matters and things to be done, ex- 
ecuted and performed by and through their agency and under their 
superintendence, by virtue of the act aforesaid and of this Ordinance, 
shall be done, executed and performed in a substantial, economical and 
effectual manner ; that all the officers, agents and other persons who 
may be employed by them in the works aforesaid, execute and dis- 
charge the duties and labors assigned to them respectively, in a dili- 
gent and faithful manner; and that all contracts and agreements made 
and concluded by them in the execution of the duties of their office 
are faithfully and properly executed and performed. 

Sect. 9. The Commissioners aforesaid shall enter or cause to be, 
entered, in a book to be kept for that purpose, and which shall be sub- 
ject to the inspection and examination of the Joint Standing Commit- 
tee of the City Council on Water Works, or of any other committee 
appointed by the City Council for that purpose, a journal, account or 
record of all rules, orders, votes, appointments, resolutions, proceedings 
and other official acts which may from time to time be adopted by 
them ; and the said Commissioners shall, at the beginning of each 
month during their continuance in office, make a report in writing 
to the said Joint Standing Committee of their proceedings during the 
month next preceding such report. And the said Joint Standing 
Committee shall, at the expiration of each period of three months, 



17 

make a written report to the City Council upon the matters committed 
to them. 

Sect. 10. In order to enable the City Council seasonably to raise 
and provide the funds necessary for defraying the cost and expenses 
which may from time to time be incurred in the prosecution of the 
work, and for carrying into lull effect the purposes and objects of the 
act aforesaid, and of this Ordinance, the Commissioners aforesaid shall 
from time to time seasonably make and prepare, with as much particu- 
larity as may be useful and practicable, estimates for the use of the said 
City Council, of such sums of money as, in their judgment, may be re- 
quired ; and statements of the purposes for which said sums respectively 
are to be appropriated and applied. 

Sect. 11. It shall be the duty of the Commissioners aforesaid to 
investigate promptly all cases in which it appears probable that any 
damages may be claimed of the city by any person or corporation for 
any alleged injury to the body or the property, real or personal, of such 
person or corporation by reason of any decision, action or operation of 
said Commissioners, or of others employed by them in the performance 
of any of the matters and things committed to their charge by the act 
aforesaid, and this Ordinance ; and to make forthwith a memorandum 
in writing of all the important facts and circumstances relating 
thereto, together with a list of the names of all persons whose testi- 
mony concerning the particulars of such alleged injury may be deemed 
important by said Commissioners, which memorandum they shall file 
and preserve. 

Sect. 12. In all suits, processes, and questions in law or equity 
which may be commenced, prosecuted or pending by or against the 
City of Lowell in any court, or before any other tribunal, for or by 
reason of any act, proceeding or contract of the Commissioners afore- 
said, or of the City of Lowell, or for any other cause arising from the 
execution of the powers and authority given by the provisions of the 
act aforesaid and of this Ordinance, the said Commissioners shall aid 
and assist the counsel employed in behalf of the city, by giving infor- 
mation of all facts within their knowledge, and furnishing any docu- 



18 

ments, testimony and evidence in their possession or control, which 
may he material, important or useful in establishing the rights and 
protecting the interests of said city. 

Sect. 13. All bills on account of said water works shall be ex- 
amined by said Commissioners, and if found correct shall be so certi- 
fied by them, and that the same have been incurred in the construc- 
tion of the water works, and the Mayor shall draw his order therefor 
upon the Treasurer when the same shall have been audited and ap- 
proved by the Joint Standing Committee of the City Council, on Water 
Works, or of such committee as shall be appointed by the City Coun- 
cil to inspect and examine the proceedings and official acts of the said 
Commissioners, under the provisions of section nine. 

Sect. 14. This Ordinance and all its provisions shall be subject 
to such revision, alteration, amendment or repeal at the discretion of 
the City Council of the City of Lowell as shall not be inconsistent with 
the provisions of the act of the Legislature aforesaid. 

In Common Council, November 23, 1869. 
Passed to be ordained. William H. Anderson, President. 

In Board of Aldermen, November 23, 1869. 
Passed to be ordained. Jonathan P. Folsom, Mayor. 

On July 26th, 1870, the City Council passed an ordinance in ad- 
dition to " An Ordinance in Relation to Water Commissioners and 
Water Works." 

Section 1. For the purpose of carrying into effect an act of the 
Legislature of the Commonwealth, entitled " An Act to amend Chapter 
351 of the Acts of the year 1869 for supplying the City of Lowell with 
Water," it is hereby ordained and determined that water shall be taken 
from Merrimack River* at a point in Dracut above Pawtucket Falls, 
and therefrom conveyed in a brick conduit to settling basins near the 
outlet of Beaver Brook in said Dracut, and thence into and through 
said city in such manner as the Lowell Water Commissioners shall 
deem most expedient, and by the construction of such works as may be 
necessary therefor. 

*The words " and from Filter Galleries " inserted, and the words in italic struck out by 
Ordinance passed December 27, 1870. 



19 

Sect. 2. The Lowell Water Commissioners shall have authority 
to convey into and through said city, the waters of said Merrimack 
River as aforesaid, in accordance with the provisions of said act, and 
shall have and exercise all the powers conferred on said city by said 
act, and in the taking of the said waters as aforesaid, shall have all the 
powers, privileges, and duties, and be subject to all the liabilities and 
restrictions given and imposed on them by the ordinance passed by the 
City Council of said Lowell, November 23rd, A. D. 1869, entitled 
"An Ordinance in relation to Water Commissioners and Water Works," 
as fully as if herein specifically mentioned. 

Sect. 3. So much of said ordinance passed November 23rd, 
A. D. 1869, as conflicts and is inconsistent with the provisions of this 
ordinance is hereby repealed. 

In Common Council, July 26, 1870. 
Passed to be ordained. Albert A. Haggett, President. 

In Board of Aldermen, July 26, 1870. 
Passed to be ordained. Jonathan P. Folsom, Mayor. 

. Under the provisions of the foregoing Acts and Ordinances, in 
December, 1869, and January, 1870, Levi Sprague, William E. 
Livingston and Henry H. Wilder were elected Water Com- 
missioners. Subsequently, Mr. Wilder declined, and Samuel K. 
Hutchinson succeeded him. 

These Commissioners proceeded to take lands and to construct the 
Lowell Water Works. 



CLAIMS FOR DAMAGES BY THE 
WATER WORKS. 



After the water works had been completed, The Proprietors of the 
Locks and Canals on Merrimack River, and the other manufacturing 
companies hereinafter named, filed their petition with the County 
Commissioners for a jury to assess the damages sustained by them, by 
the taking of their land and water for these water works. On 
September 1st, 1875, a proposition was presented to the City Council 
by the Mayor, to submit the various questions presented upon this 
petition to the arbitration of Benjamin F. Thomas of Boston, E. A. 
Straw of Manchester, New Hampshire, and J. P. Kirkwood of 
Brookline. 

Great public interest was felt in this measure, and protracted de- 
bates took place thereon in the City Council. But the proposition 
proved unsatisfactory. A resolution to refer these questions to the 
Water Board was next introduced by Alderman Benjamin Wal- 
ker. It passed the Board of Aldermen, but was finally defeated in the 
Common Council. 

At length, on November 3rd, 1875, Councilman Charles Cowley 
introduced, in the Common Council, the following resolution, which, 
after another protracted debate, was passed on the 9th, and approved 
by the Mayor on the 11th, of the same month : — 

Resolution to refer the petition of The Proprietors of Locks and 
Canals on Merrimack River and others, against the city to a Joint 
Special Committee. 



21 

Resolved, By the Board of Aldermen and Common Council of 
the City of Lowell, in City Council assembled, as follows : — 

That the subject matter of the petition of The Proprietors of 
Locks and Canals on Merrimack River and other incorporated compa- 
nies, for a jury to assess the damages alleged to have been sustained 
by said petitioners by the taking of land and water for the Lowell 
Water Works, be referred to a Joint Special Committee, to consist of 
the Mayor, two Aldermen and four Common Councilmen, with authority 
to meet and confer with any person or persons representing said petition- 
ers, with the view to the amicable adjustment of such claims of said 
petitioners, as in the judgment of said committee may be just and well 
founded. 

The committee appointed under this resolution consisted of Mayor 
Francis Jewett, Aldermen John A. Goodwin and Jacob Rogers, 
and Councilmen Charles Cowley, Earl A. Thissell, Joel A. 
Abbott and John B. Lyford. 

The first result of this Committee's labors was the following 
resolution, which passed both branches of the City Council, December 
20th, 1875, and was approved by the Mayor on the 22nd of the same 
month : — 

Resolution authorizing the settlement of the claims of The Pro- 
prietors of Locks and Canals on Merrimack River, and other corpo. 
ratioijs. 

Resolved, By the Board of Aldermen, and Common Council of 
the City of Lowell, in City Council assembled, as follows : — 

That the Joint Special Committee appointed in pursuance of a 
resolution of the City Council, entitled "Resolution to refer the petition 
of The Proprietors of Locks and Canals on Merrimack River, and others, 
against the city, to a Joint Special Committee," approved by the Mayor 
on the eleventh day of November now last past ; said committee con- 
sisting of the Mayor, Aldermen Goodwin and Rogers, and Council- 
men Cowley, Thissell, Abbott and Lyford, be and they are hereby 
authorized and empowered to adjust and settle all claims of The Proprie- 
tors of the Locks and Canals on Merrimack River, the Merrimack 



22 

Manufacturing Company, the Hamilton Manufacturing Company, the 
Appleton Company, the Lowell Manufacturing Company, the Middle- 
sex Company, the Tremont and Suffolk Mills, the Lawrence Manufac- 
turing Company, the Boot Cotton Mills, the Massachusetts Cotton 
Mills and the Lowell Machine Shop, corporations duly established by 
law, against the City of Lowell, now pending before a sheriff 's jury for 
the Countj- of Middlesex : and that the Mayor be and he is hereby au- 
thorized, for and on behalf of the City of Lowell, to make, execute, ac- 
knowledge and deliver such deeds of release and instruments, as said 
committee may approve to carry into effect the purposes of this resolu- 
tion : And to effect such adjustment and settlement said com- 
mittee may pay and expend a sum not exceeding fifty thousand 
dollars, which shall be charged to the appropriation for water works. 

The next result of the labors of this Joint Special Committee was 
the following resolution, which passed both branches of the City Coun- 
cil, and was approved by the Mayor, December 28th, 1875 : — 

Resolution to take certain waters for the use of the inhabitants 
of the City of Lowell. 

Resolved, By the Board of Aldermen, and Common Council of 
the City of Lowell, in City Council assembled, as follows: — 

That the City of Lowell has taken, and does hereby take under 
and by authority of law of this Commonwealth, approved June 3rd, 
]870, entitled "An act to amend chapter three hundred and fifty-one 
of the acts of the } 7 ear eighteen hundred and sixty-nine for sup- 
plying the City of Lowell with water," a certain quantity and 
part of the waters of the Merrimack River above the dam of The Pro- 
prietors of the Locks and Canals on Merrimack River, in that part of 
said Lowell, which was set off from the Town of Dracut, and annexed 
to said Lowell, by an act of law passed in the year eighteen hundred 
and seventj'-four, and of such other waters as by filtration, percolation 
or subterraneous streams flow into the filtering gallery or other works 
of said city, and the following is a description, definition and limitation 
of the quantity of water and rights therein taken by said city, under the 
authority of said act of law, to wit : all and so much of the waters afore- 



said as shall at any time be by said city raised by pumping or other 
equivalent means, into the reservoir of said city, on the easterly side of 
Beacon Street, or some reservoir of not less height than said existing 
reservoir, or by pumping or forcing by other equivalent means into the 
city mains by the use of a pumping or raising force, equivalent to the 
pressure of the water in said reservoir, when connected with such mains, 
and such as said city shall necessarily cause to flow out of its conduit 
or other water works, for the purpose of necessary cleansing thereof, 
during such times as the water of said river shall be flowing to waste 
over the top of said dam, and such waters as shall necessarily be al- 
lowed to flow out of said conduit or other water works aforesaid at any 
time, for the purpose of making necessary repairs of said conduit or 
other parts of said water works : And there is hereby saved and re- 
served to all persons and corporations, owning or having aii3 r rights in 
or of the waters of said river and the waters flowing into the same, and 
the water power and mill privileges created thereby, and especially 
to the owners of said dam and the canals leading from said river in 
said Lowell, the full and complete use and improvement of the residue 
of the water of said river and waters flowing into the same, not taken 
by said city as above defined, described and limited, as fully and com- 
pletely as they respectively might rightfully and lawfully have used 
and enjoyed said residue, if said city had not taken the part and 
quantity of said waters herein above described, defined and limited ; 
and that the Mayor be and he is hereby authorized and directed to 
sign, and file in the office of the registry of deeds, for the northern 
district of the county of Middlesex, a description and statement of the 
quantity and parts of said waters so taken, as herein before set forth, as 
required by said act. 

On December 31st, 1875, the City Council passed, and the Mayor 
approved, the following : — 

Resolution providing for the settlement of certain claims of The 
Proprietors of the Locks and Canals on Merrimack River, and other 
corporations, against the City : — 

Resolved, By the Board of Aldermen, and Common Council of 
the City of Lowell, in City Council, assembled, as follows : — 



24 

For the purpose of adjusting and settling the claims of the corpora- 
tions hereinafter named, viz : The Proprietors of the Locks and Canals 
on Merrimack River, the Merrimack Manufacturing Company, Hamil- 
ton Manufacturing Company, Appleton Company, Lowell Manufacturing 
Company, Middlesex Company, Tremont and Suffolk Mills, Lawrence 
Manufacturing Company, Boot Cotton Mills, Massachusetts Cotton 
Mills, and Lowell Machine Shop, against said city, for and on account 
of the taking by said city, of certain lands and water described in the 
form of indenture hereinafter set forth, for the purposes and under the 
authority in said form of indenture stated, the City Treasurer is here- 
by authorized to pay unto said corporations the sum of fifty thousand 
dollars, which said sum shall be charged to the Appropriation for water 
works ; and the Mayor be and is hereby authorized, in the name and 
on the part and behalf of said city, to make, sign, seal with the seal of 
said city, duly acknowledge and deliver unto said corporations a deed 
and indenture between said city and said corporations of the form, 
tenor and effect following, to wit : — 



jj> 7 3'- 7 & 



AGREEMENT FOR SETTLEMENT. 



Whereas, The Proprietors of the Locks and Canals on 
Merrimack River claim to have been at the time of the tak- 
ing hereinafter mentioned the owners of a certain lot of 
land situated in that part of Lowell in the county of Middle- 
sex and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, which was re- 
cently a part of the territory of the town of Dracut, con- 
taining thirty-three thousand one hundred and fifty-two 
square feet, and thus bounded, to wit : Beginning at the 
centre of Flaggy Meadow Brook, so called, at a point distant 
north-westerly fifty feet from the centre line of the Filter- 
ing Gallery of the city of Lowell, and thence running north* 
easterly on other land of said Proprietors, in a line parallel 
with, and distant north-westerly fifty feet from, the centre 
line of said Gallery, to the "river road" so called ; thence by 
said road easterly to a point twenty-one feet and seven- 
tenths of a foot north-easterly from the centre line of the 
•'Inlet Pipe," so called, of said city's water-works ; thence 
south-easterly in a line parallel with, and twenty-one and 
seven-tenths feet distant north-easterly from the centre line 
of said "Inlet Pipe," about fifty feet to the bank of Mer- 
rimack River ; thence south-westerly by the shore of said 



/«?* 



-7* 



26 



river to the centre of the old bed of said brook ; and thence 
following the centre of said old bed to the point of be- 
ginning. 

Also a certain other lot, strip, or parcel of land situated 
in said part of said Lowell, containing forty-seven thousand 
seven hundred and seventy-four square feet, and thus 
bounded, to wit : Beginning at the easterly line of the road 
leading from Pawtucket Bridge to the "Navy Yard," so 
called, at a point distant south-easterly twenty feet from the 
centre line of the conduit of the water-works of said city, in 
a line at right angles to said conduit; and thence running 
north-easterly on other land of said Proprietors in aline par- 
allel with, and distant south-easterly twenty feet from, the 
centre line of said conduit and the centre line of water-pipe 
of said city on the premises, to land of Flenry Emery • thence 
westerly on land lately of said Emery (but taken by said 
city for the same purposes hereinafter named) to a point 
distant forty feet north-westerly from the centre line of said 
water-pipe, in a line at right angles to said water-pipe ; 
thence south-westerly on other land of said Proprietors, in 
a line parallel with, and distant forty feet north-westerly 
from, the centre line of said water-pipe and conduit to said 
last named road ; and thence south-easterly by said road to 
the point of beginning. 

Also a certain other lot or strip of land situated in said 
part of said Lowell, containing six hundred and ninety-three 
square feet, and thus bounded, to wit : Beginning at a stone 
bound at land lately of Henry Emery (taken by said city as 
aforesaid,) and thence running north-easterly on the last- 
named land one hundred and nineteen feet; thence south- 



27 

westerly on other land of said Proprietors one hundred 
twenty-seven and three-tenths feet to said land lately of said 
Emery ; and thence northerly on the last-named land to the 
point of beginning. 

Also a certain other lot or strip of land situated in said 
part of said Lowell, containing thirty-three thousand four 
hundred and forty-seven square feet, and thus bounded, to 
wit: Beginning at land now or lately of Henry Read, at a 
point distant twenty feet south-westerly fiom the centreline 
of said city's water-pipe on the premises, in a line at right 
angles to said pipe ; and thence running north-westerly in a 
line parallel with, and twenty feet south-westerly from, the 
centre line of said pipe, on other land of said Proprietors, to 
Beaver Brook ; thence northeasterly by said brook to a 
point forty feet distant north-easterly from the centre line of 
said pipe, in a line at right angles to said pipe ; thence 
south-easterly in a line parallel with, and forty feet north- 
easterly from the centre line of said pipe, on other land of 
said Proprietors, to land now or lately of said Bead; and 
thence on the last named land south-westerly to the point of 
beginning. 

Also a certain other lot of land situated in that part of 
said Lowell called "Centralville," containing eleven thousand 
three hundred twelve and a half square feet, and thus bounded, 
to wit: Beginning at a stone bound on the, easterly side of 
Beacon Street about one hundred eighty-eight and one-fourth 
feet northerly from a bound at the north-westerly corner of 
land now or formerly of John Edwards, and thence running 
northerly on said street fifty feet ; thence at nearly a right 
angle easterly, two hundred twenty-five and thirty-eight 



28 

one-hundredths feet ; thence at nearly a right angle south- 
erly, fifty feet ; and thence westerly parallel to the second 
described line two hundred twenty-seven and twelve one- 
hundredths feet, to the point of beginning. 

Also a certain other lot, strip, or parcel of land situated 
in that part of said Lowell called "Centralville," containing 
twelve thousand four hundred and fifty square feet, and 
bounded as follows, to wit : Beginning at the easterly line of 
land of said Proprietors, culled " Bradley Street," at a point 
distant twenty-five feet north-w r esterly from the centreline of 
the water-pipe of said city on the premises, in a line at right 
angles to the centre line of said pipe ; and thence running 
south-westerly across said " Bradley Street," and on other 
land of said Proprietor?, in a line parallel with, and distant 
north-westerly twenty-five feet from, the centre line of said 
pipe, two hundred and forty-nine feet to a point at Merrimack 
River ; thence south-easterly by said river to a point distant 
twenty-five feet south-easterly from the centre line of said 
pipe, in a line at right angles to said pipe; thence north- 
easterly in a line parallel with, and twenty-five feet south- 
easterly from the centre line of said pipe, on other land of 
said Proprietors, and across said "Bradley Street," two hun- 
' dred and forty-nine feet to the easterly line thereof; and 
thence north-westerly by the easterly line of said "Bradley 
Street" to the point of beginning. 

Also a certain other lot, strip, or parcel of land situated 
in that part of said Lowell called "Belvidere," containing 
seven thousand three hundred and fifty square feet, and 
bounded as follows, to wit : Beginning at a point on the 
southerly shore of Merrimack River, which is distant north- 



29 

easterly one hundred and forty-six feet from the north- 
easterly line of Stackpole Street, and twenty-five feet north- 
westerly from the centre line of the water-pipe of said city 
on the premises, in a line at right angles to said pipe; and 
thence running south 38° 25' west on other land of said 
Proprietors, to the north-easterly line of Stackpole Street ; 
thence south-easterly on said line of Stackpole Street about 
fifty feet; thence north 38° 25' east on other land of said 
Proprietors in a line parallel with, and fifty feet south-east- 
easterly from the first-described line, one hundred and forty- 
eight feet ; and thence north-westerly to the point of begin- 
ning. 

Also a certain other lot of land situated in said Lowell, 
and being a part of the bed of Merrimack River, and thus 
bounded, to wit: Beginning at the south-westerly corner of 
the sixth lot above described, and thence running south- 
westerly on other land of said Proprietors, in a line parallel 
with, and twenty-five feet north-westerly from the centre 
line of said city's water-pipe on the premises, across said 
river to the north-westerly corner of the seventh lot above 
described ; thence south-easterly by said seventh-described 
lot about fifty feet ; thence north-easterly on other land of 
said Proprietors, in a line parallel with, and twenty-five feet 
south-easterly from the centre line of said pipe, crossing said 
river to the south-easterly corner of said sixth-described lot; 
and thence north-westerly by said sixth-described lot to the 
point of beginning. 

And Whereas, said Proprietors claim to have had and 
owned a certain easement and right of way in and over a 
certain other lot, strip, or parcel of land situated in that part 



30 

of said Lowell which was lately a part of Dracut, and bounded 
and described as follows, to wit : Beginning at the second 
lot of land above described, and other land of said Proprietors, 
at a point distant twenty feet southerly from the centre line 
of the water-pipe of said city in a line at right angles to 
said pipe, and thence running north-easterly on said Emery's 
land and other land of said Proprietors, in a line parallel 
with, and twenty feet southerly from the centre line of said 
pipe, to Beaver Brook; thence northerly by said brook to a 
point distant forty feet northerly from the centre of said 
pipe; thence south-westerly on land of said Emery in a line 
parallel with, and forty feet northerly from the centre line of 
said pipe, to other land of said Proprietors; and thence east- 
erly on the second lot above described, to the point of begin- 
ning. 

And Whereas, the said city of Lowell, under authority 
of laws of said Commonwealth, has fur the purpose of sup- 
plying water for the use of said city and the inhabitants 
thereof, for the extinguishment of fires, creating steam, do- 
mestic and other purposes, taken each and all of the several 
lots, strips and parcels of land above described, and the same 
are embraced and included in the descriptions of lands taken 
by said city for said purposes, filed by said city, in the office 
of the Registry of Deeds for the northern district of said 
county. 

And Whereas, the said Proprietors of the Locks and 
Canals on Merrimack River, the Merrimack Manufacturing 
Company, the Hamilton Manufacturing Company, the Ap- 
pleton Company, the Lowell Manufacturing Company, the 



31 

Middlesex Company, the Tremont and Suffolk Mills, the 
Lawrence Manufacturing Company, the Boott Cotton Mills, 
the Massachusetts Cotton Mills, and the Lowell Machine 
Shop, corporations duly established under laws of said Com- 
monwealth, claim to be, and for many years last past to have 
been, the owners of, or to have certain vested rights and in- 
terests in, the dam across the Merrimack River, at or near 
" Pawtucket Falls" in said Lowell, and the water-powers and 
mill-privileges of said river, at and above said falls in said 
Lowell, and certain canals and water-courses leading from 
said river, at and above said dam, through which the water 
of said river is conducted, and flows to certain mills and 
estates of said several corporations. 

And Whereas, said city of Lowell, for the purposes 
aforesaid, has also constructed certain conduits and other 
water-works, capable of drawing and conducting water from 
said river, above said dam, and within that part of said Low- 
ell which was set off from the town of Dracut, ;ind annexed 
to said Lowell by act of law passed in the year eighteen 
hundred and seventy-four. And on the twenty-ninth day of 
December instant, said city of Low r ell has filed in said 
Registry of Deeds, a description, definition, and limitation of 
the quantity of water and water rights taken by said city for 
the purposes aforesaid under authority of said laws. 

And Whereas, said several corporations above named, 
have heretofore made certain claims, and instituted certain 
proceedings against said city for the recovery of damages 
occasioned by the taking as aforesaid of said lots of land 
and the alleged diversion of water from said river by said 



32 

city, for the purposes aforesaid, which proceedings and claims 
are now pending before a jury summoned by the sheriff of 
said county. 

Now this Indenture made this thirty-first day of De- 
cember, in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and seven- 
ty-five, by and between the city of Lowell aforesaid, as party 
of the first part, said Proprietors of the Locks and Canals on 
Merrimack River, as party of the second part, and said Mer- 
rimack Manufacturing Company, Hamilton Manufacturing 
Company, Appleton Company, Lowell Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Middlesex Company, Tremont and Suffolk Mills, Law- 
rence Manufacturing Company, Boott Cotton Mills, Mas- 
achusetts Cotton Mills and Lowell Machine Shop, as parties 
of the third part, ivitncsseth, — 

That said city of Lowell, in consideration of the prem- 
ises and the release hereinafter made by said parties of the 
second and third parts, doth hereby release unto said Pio- 
prietors of the Locks and Canals on Merrimack River, their 
successors and assigns, the right, privilege and easement as 
against said city, its successors and assigns, and all persons 
or corporations acting by, through or under it or them, of 
crossing and re-crossing and using as and for a way and 
passage, for persons, beasts, teams and vehicles, at any and 
all times forever, to and from and between any of the other 
lands now of said Proprietors or elsewhere, the second, third, 
fourth, sixth, seventh and ninth lots, strips or parcels of land 
herein above described, and any and every part and parts 
thereof. And said city of Lowell doth also hereby forever 
release unto said Proprietors of the Locks and Canals on 
Merrimack River, their successors and assigns, all the rights, 



33 

title, claim, easements and estate of said city of Lowell, un- 
der or by force of the taking aforesaid or otherwise, in or to 
the second, third, fourth, sixth, seventh and eighth lots, strips 
or parcels of land herein above described, exceptthe rights 
of said city of forever having, keeping, maintaining, replac- 
ing, repairing, and using for the purpose of supplying said 
city and its inhabitants with water, for the uses and in the 
manner herein set fortlr, in, upon and through said several 
lots, strips or parcels of land, water-pipes and other ap- 
purtenances of said water- works, in such manner as shall 
not unreasonably or unnecessarity interfere with or interrupt 
the possession, occupation, use and improvement of said 
lands by said Proprietors of the Locks and Canals on Merri- 
mack River, their successors and assigns. To have and to 
hold the above released premises, rights, easements, and 
privileges to said Proprietors, their successors and assigns, 
to their use and behoof forever. Provided however that 
nothing herein shall authorize said Proprietors, their suc- 
cessors or assigns to substantially interfere with the neces- 
sary or reasonable maintenance and repairing of the water- 
pipes or other necessary appendages and erections of the 
water- works of said city. 

And said city of Lowell doth also hereby covenant, 
promise and agree unto and with said parties of the second 
and third parts, and each and every of them and their 
respective successors and assigns, that said city nor its suc- 
cessors, nor any person under or by its or their authority 
shall and will not at any time take, draw or divert from 
said river or any source contributing water to said river, 
above said dam, or from the Filtering Gallery, so called, of 



34 

said city, in said part of said Lowell, and annexed as afore- 
said, any of the waters thereof, for the purposes herein above 
named, except such as said city shall raise by pumping or 
other equivalent means into the reservoir of said city on the 
easterly side of Beacon Street, in said Lowell, or some reser- 
voir of not less height than said existing reservoir, or by 
pumping or forcing by other equivalent means into the city 
mains by the use of a pumping or raising force equivalent 
to the pressure of the water in said reservoir when connected 
with said mains, and such as said city shall necessarily cause 
to flow out of its conduit or other water-works, for the pur- 
pose of necessary cleansing thereof, during such times as the 
water of said river shall be flowing to waste over the top of 
said dam, and such water as shall necessarily be allowed to 
flow out of said conduits or other water-works aforesaid, at 
any time for the purpose of making necessary repairs of said 
conduits or other pfirts of said water-works ; nor in carrying 
into effect the powers granted to said city, in or by the act 
of law passed in the year eighteen hundred and seventy, 
entitled " An Act to amend Chapter three hundred and 
forty-one of the Acts of the year eighteen hundred and sixty- 
nine, for supplying the city of Lowell with water," or the 
taking aforesaid, construct or maintain any works or struc- 
ture, or do any act that shall injure, endanger or impair said 
dam, or prevent, interrupt or hinder the residue of the 
waters of said river, and sources contributing thereto above 
said dam, not pumped or drawn by said city in the manner 
and for the purposes herein above specified, from flowing 
into and through said canals and water courses, and to any 
of the mills of said parties, or any of them of the second 



35 

and third parts; and that said city will atall times use 
reasonable diligence to prevent the water drawn by faid 
city as aforesaid, from being wasted or used for power for 
propelling or operating machinery, otherwise than as steam, 
or for any other purpose not authorized by said laws. 

And the said parties of the second and third parts in 
consideration of the foregoing release and covenants, and 
fifty thousand dollars to them paid by said city, the receipt 
whereof is hereby acknowledged, do hereby forever release 
and discharge said city of Lowell from all, each and every 
claim or right to any other compensation or damages for and 
on account of the taking as aforesaid of said several lots, 
strips or parcels of land, and the quantity of water and rights 
therein, herein above described. And it is agreed by and 
between said parties that said proceedings now pending be- 
fore said jury as aforesaid, shall be discontinued, and said 
jury be discharged. 

In Witness Whereof, said city of Lowell has caused its 
seal to be hereunto set and this indenture to be signed by 
Francis Jewett, its Mayor, hereunto duly authorized by 
resolution of the Board of Aldermen and Common Council of 
said city, in city council assembled, passed and approved by 
said Mayor on the day of the date hereof; and the said 
parties of the second and third parts, to wit : said Proprie- 
tors of the Locks and Canals on Merrimack River, Merri- 
mack Manufacturing Company, Hamilton Manufacturing 
Company, Appleton Company, Lowell Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Middlesex Company, Tremont and Suffolk Mills, 
Lawrence Manufacturing Company, Boott Cotton Mills, 



36 

Massachusetts Cotton Mills and Lowell Machine Shop, have 
hereunto set their several and respective corporate names 
and seals by their respective treasurers, this said thirty-first 
day of December, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight 
hundred and seventy-five. 



Witness, 
A. P. Bonne y, 
George F. Richardson. 



The City of Lowell, 

by 
Francis Jewett, Mayor. L S. 



Eliot Hubbard. 



Proprietors of Locks and Cana's on Merrimack 
River, by 

John T. Morse, Treasurer. L S. 



J. (J. Robinson. 



Samuel R. Payson. 



Charles P. Young. 



H. B. Lincoln. 



The Merrimack Manufacturing Company, 

by 

P. B. Crowinshield, Treasurer. L S. 
Lawrence Manufacturing Company, 

by 

T. Jefferson Coolidge, Treasurer. L S. 
Tremont and Suffolk Mills, 

by 

J. C. Birdsyk, Treasurer. L S. 

Bcott Cotton Mills, 

by 
Augustus Lowell, Treasurer. L S. 



H. B. Lincoln. 



Thos. Sampson 



•I 



A. S. Wkeks. I 
) 



A. S. Weeks. 



ETCS. V- 



Massachusetts Cotton Mills, 

by 

Geo. Atkinson, Treasurer. L S. 

Lowell Manufacturing Company, 

by 

Samuel Fay, Treasurer. L S. 

Hamilton Manufacturing Company, 

by 

Jas. A. Dupee, Treasurer. L S. 
Appleton Company, 

by 
Jas. A. Dupee, Treasurer. L S. 



37 

~) Middlesex Company, 

G. L. Silsbee. >• by 

) R. S. Fay, Treasurer. L S. 

~) Lowell Machine Shop, 

E. S. Woodies, v by 

) J. Thos. Stevenson, Treasurer. L S. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Middlesex ss. 
On the first day of January, A. D. 1876. 

Personally appeared Francis Jewett, Mayor of the 
above named City of Lowell and for and on behalf of said 
city acknowledged the above to be the free act and deed of 
said City of Lowell ; before me, 

Samuel A. McPheteiis, J ustice of the Peace. 



Lowell, ss. January 1, 1876. 
Received at 11:45 A. M. and recorded with Middlesex North 
District Deeds, Book 114, Page 12.1. 

J. P. Thompson, Register. 




LOWELL ARMS. 




m 



HE 



I-CENTENNIAL OF 




JJLI. 



PKOCEEDIN~GS 



IN THE CITY OF LOWELL 



AT THE 



S en\i - C ei\ tei\nik,l C ele Wktioij 



OF THE 



INCORPORATION 



OF THE 



TOWN" OF LOWELL, 

Match 1st, 1B76, 



LOWELL, MASS.: 
PENHALLOW PRINTING ESTABLISHMENT, NO. 12 MIDDLE STREET. 

18 7 6. 



PREFATORY. 



The public commemoration of the incorporation of the town of 
Lowell was first proposed in the Common Council, February 9th, 1875, 
when Councilman Charles Cowley introduced the following order, 
which passed both branches of the City Council unanimously : — 

"Ordered, that a joint special committee, to consist of the Mayor, 
the President of the Common Council, two members of the Board of 
Aldermen and three members of the Common Council, be appointed to 
consider the propriety of commemorating the entry of the municipality 
of Lowell upon the fiftieth year of its existence, on the first day of 
March next, and to report in what manner, if any, the same should be 
commemorated." 

The Committee appointed under this resolution consisted of 
Mayor Francis Jewett, Aldermen John A. Goodwin and Hapgood 
Wright, Albert A. Haggett, President, and Charles Cowley, 
Charles W. Sleeper, and Edward E. Reed, members of the Com- 
mon Council. Preparations were begun for the celebration, and the 
late Tappan Went worth was selected as Orator of the Day ; but 
he was called away by death before the time arrived for what would 
have been to him, as well as to his audience, a most acceptable service. 

On account of the lack of time to complete the desired arrange- 
ments, the Committee reported the commemoration to be inexpedient 
until another year. In their report they say : 

" Between the appointment of your Committee and the first day of 
March next, the first day of Lowell's year of Jubilee, there was found 



Q PREFATORY. 

to be too little time to make the necessary preparations for such a cel- 
ebration as the occasion seems d to require. In modern times, the cele- 
bration of centennial and semi-centennial anniversaries has, to a great 
extent, superseded the festivities of the jubilees of ancient times. 
Your Committee believe that a public commemoration of the founding 
of our municipality would tend strongly to foster, in the hearts of all 
our people, an honorable pride in her institutions, her industries, and 
her history, and a laudable ambition to increase her fair renown ; — and 
that such a celebration should be had while some of those who were 
present at our municipal nativity, still survive to participate therein ; 
but your Committee deem it advisable, under all the circumstances, to 
postpone such celebration till the completion of the year of our Jubilee, 
upon which we are about to enter." 

On November 23rd, 1875, the Old Residents' Historical Associa- 
tion sent to the City Council the following communication. 

" To the Mayor, Aldermen and Common Council of the City of 
Lowell: 

At the Quarterly meeting of the Old Residents' Historical Asso- 
ciation, holden Thursday evening, Nov. 11, 1875, it was unanimously 

Resolved, That this Association earnestly desires that there be 
a public celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the municipal inde- 
pendence of the Town, now City, of Lowell, which occurs March 
1, 1876 ; and will gladly co-operate with the City Council in any meas- 
ures which they may adopt for that purpose. 

Alfred Gilman, 

Secretary." 

This communication was referred to a special committee consisting 
of Aldermen John A. Goodwin and Hapgood Wkight, and Coun- 
cilmen Charles Cowley, W. A. Read and Francis Carll. Before 
the expiration of the year, they reported a recommendation that 
such a celebration be held, and also recommended that the matter be 
referred to the incoming city government, which suggestion was 
adopted. 



SEMI- CENTENNIA L OF LO WELL. 7 

At the organization of the City Council, January 3rd, 1876, the 
celebration of this semi-centennial anniversary was recommended by 
Mayor Charles A. Stott, in his inaugural address. On the same 
day, the following resolution, introduced by Councilman Charles 
Cowley, was unanimously adopted : 

"Resolved, That a joint special committee, to consist of three 
members of the Common Council and two members of the Board of 
Aldermen, be appointed to make all necessaiy arrangen ents for the 
public celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the incorporation of the 
town of Lowell, March 1st, 1876, and that all papers referred to the 
present City Council by the last City Council, relating to the commem- 
oration of said incorporation, and also so much of the Mayor's inaugu- 
ral address as relates thereto, be referred to said committee." 

The Committee appointed under this resolution consisted of Coun- 
cilmen Charles Cowley, John F. Kimball and Edward Stock- 
man, and Aldermen John A. Goodwin and George E. Stanley. 

The following resolution was reported by this Committee, and 
adopted by the City Council, January 11th. 

"Resolved, That in commemoration of the incorporation of the 
town of Lowell, the Mayor, the City Council and the citizens generally, 
or so many of them as may be pleased so to do, shall assemble in 
Huntington Hall at two o'clock p. m. on the first day of March next 
ensuing, being the fiftieth anniversary of said incorporation, for 
thanksgiving and prayer — for singing in which the children and 
youth of the public schools shall join — for hearing historical addresses 
and letters — and for such other exercises as are appropriate to the 
occasion ; and the Mayor shall be requested to preside. From sunrise 
to sunset, on that day, the American ensign shall be displayed on the 
public buildings and such other places as the Mayor may direct. At 
meridian, on said day, a national salute shall be fired, and from merid- 
ian to one o'clock the bells shall be rung. The people of the city in 
general — the survivors of the earlier inhabitants and the Old Resi- 
dent's Historical Association in particular — are invited to assist in 
these commemorative services. 



8 PREFATORY. 

The committee of arrangements shall cause a record of said ser- 
vices to be published in a style uniform with other city documents, and 
the expenses thereof shall be charged to the reserved fund." 

The committee of arrangements for the celebration, consisting of 
Josiah G. Peabody, John W. Smith, Alfred Gilmax, Benja- 
min Walker and Hapgood Wright, of the Old Eesidents' His- 
torical Association, besides the members of the City Council above 
named, organized by the choice of Charles Cowley as Chairman and' 
John F. Kimball as Secretary. Subsequently, the Chairman, Sec- 
retary and Alderman Goodwin were appointed a Committee to super- 
intend the publication of the record of the proceedings. 

This Committee met many times; the Mayor and Dr. John 0. 
Gueex, President of the Old Residents' Historical Association, met by 
invitation with them, and assisted in perfecting the arrangements 
according to the following revised programme, for a celebration in three 
distinct parts — forenoon, afternoon, and evening. 



HEM1-CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 



■&o 



t^ 



CeJ 



e b 



*m 



- 4«i.^s ty?? >£■<' ^-^ w-2^ 



on. 



rami 






:flL 




£f\ ©Wim^cm (yVaDl, £/v\ V\ *Ajyu1v<W ZMojJa AlA } ^Slfc, 



COMMENCING AT 9£ O'CLOCK. 



SINGING BY A CHOIR OF 



From the Public Schools, assisted by the 

G^ei^rq^ik 0f6l\e^ti% of ©o^to^, 



GEO. F. WILLEY, Conductor. 



10 MORNING CELEBRATION. 

PROGRAMME 



1 — March, " Athalia," ----- Mendelssohn 

Orchestra.. 

( (a) — Choral, Praise ye the Lord, - Arranged by Dr. Marx 
2~] 

( (b) — Doxology, Mighty God, 

High and Grammar Schools. 
3 — Prayer, 

By Rev. George F. Stanton - , South Weymouth, Mass. 

( (a) — How can I Serve my Country Best ? - A. Freuh 
4 — Glee, } 

( (b) — We are Brothers, - Eskel 

High School. 
5 — Overture, " Der Freischtitz," ----- Weber 

Orchestra. 
6 — Song, ) (a) — Song of Praise, 



Glee, ) (b) — Murmur, Gentle Lyre, 

Grammar Schools. 
7 — Glee, High School March, - - - - G. A. Veasie 

High School. 
8 — Address, 

By Rev. Warren H. Ccjdworth, Boston 

9 — Sylphiden Polka, (For two Piccolos,) - Rietzel 

Messrs. Goering & Rietzel. 

10 — Glee, The Mermaid's Song, -.--'- S. Glover 
Grammar Schools. 

11 — Glee, Thy Flow'ry Banks, lovely River, - Mayerbeer 

High School. 
12 Address, 

By Jonathan Kimball, Supt. Public Schools, Chelsea, Mass. 
(a) — See the Setting Sun, 



13 — Glee, 



14 — Glee, 



(b) — Shades of Evening, 

Grammar Schools. 
(a) — Hail, Columbia, 

(b) — American Hymn, - Keller 

High and Grammar Schools. 



SEMI-CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 



11 



AFTERNOON CELEBRATION. 






^en|i-dentei\nikl Celebfkticq 




AT HUNTINGTON HALL, 

WEME8BAY, MAXCH 1st, 1876 2 



Commencing at 1 o'clock. 



MUSIC BY THE 

LOWELL CHORAL SOCIETY, 



GERMANIA ORCHESTRA ; 

OF BOSTON. 



CAEL ZEEEAHN, Conductor. 



12 AFTERNOON CELEBRATION. 

PROGRAMME. 



1. Overture, "Raymond." Ambroise Thomas. 

GERMANIA ORCHESTRA. 

2. PRATER, 

By Rev. THEODORE EDSON, S. T. D., Chaplain of the Day. 

S. Choral, " To God on high." ...... Mendelssohn. 

From "St. Paul." 
LOWELL CHORAL SOCIETY. 

4. Ohation, 

By Matou-General BENJAMIN E. BUTLER. 



Ode, 

. By JOHN F. FRYE. 

TO THE MUSIC OF " KELLER'S AMERICAN HYMN.' 

Home of the hillside, the torrent, the stream, 
Where the wild waters in harmony blend, 
How thy waste places with opulence teem ! 
Tides from their channels submissively bend ! 

Tides from their channels, etc. 
Here in thy beautifu valleys, 'twould seem, 
Nature to Art all her treasures would lend. 

Nature to Art, etc. 

Home of our fathers ! for toils and for cares, 
Came they from mountain and ;>ra rie and sea, 
Now to the shrine of their faith and their prayers 
Come their thinned ranks to thy great jubilee. 

Come their thinned ranks, etc. 
Each to thine altar his offering bears, 
Temple of Labor, proud boast of the Free ! 

Temple of Labor, etc. 

Home of their children ! the sons of such sires 
Guard well thy fame both in peace and in war. 
Naught shall e'er quench on thy hearth-stone 

the fires ; 
Firm we will stand for Truth, Justice and Law, 
Cherish thee ever, where'er we may be. 
Triumph of Labor, proud boast o the Free, 
Come we from mountain and prairie and sea ! 
Come, one and all, to thy great jubilee ! 



SEM-CENIE^^IAL OT L'OWElE %% 

.'<5. AtmiVE-SSES, >._..- . 

t?y Hox. JOHN A. LOWELL, Rt. Lev. THOMAS M. CLARK, D. D., 

Hon. MARSHALL P. WILDER, attcl Rev. A. A, MINER, II. 1)., 

Alternating with Instrumrtital M'uftc. 

7. Chorus, " The Heavcrrs are telling/" - Ha yd*, 

'from the "■ Creation." 

LOWELL CHORAL SOCIETY. 

"S. Historical Reminiscences, - .--.%.».<. 

By Dp, JOHN O, GREEN, President >of 0l& Residents' Association. 

T). Hallelujah Chorus, ......._ Haxdet* 

From the "Messiah." 

IX) WELL CHORAL SOCIETY. 

10. LETTER'S, - - <■ ■-..-%,-.-•. 

ISyllox.JUSIAHG. ABBOTT, Hex, SETII AMES, SAMUEL BATCHeLDER, 

and olivets. 

1 1 . Poem, - - ». - 

By JOHN S. COLBY, 

12. Old Hundred, ..-. LSjther-. 

LOWELL CHORAL SOCIETY, and audit w*c. 

From all tlint dwell below the skies, Eternal ore thy mercies, Lord, 

Let ihc Creator's praise arise; And trtith eternal is thy wwrrf : 

■Jehovah's glorious name Ira sting Thy praise shall sotmdfio'ni shore to shove., 

Through every land, by every tongue. Till suns shall rise ami set no mere. 

13. Benediction, .......■-•- 

BY THE CHAPLAIN. 



JFa ^\ ^i ; T^ YT i\ Tf . *yf? T*f % ^?W yt^ 

For tlie reception of invited guests, and others*, at Huxtixgtox Hall 
in the evening, at 7f o'clock. 



MUSIC BY THE 



14 PREFATORY. 

The national salute ordered by the City Council, was fired hy a 
itetatchment of the City Guards on the South Common, between twelve 
and one o'clock, the hells of the city joining with the 1 gssns; in celebrat- 
ing the festival. 

Although the weather was unpropitious in the forenoon, the at- 
tendance at full the services was very large, exceeding the capacity of 
Huntington Hall. By general consent, the day was observed as a 
hoiiday. All the schools, the banks, and most places of business, were 
closed, though the mills ran as usual. The presence of hundreds of 
former residents of Lowell gave peculiar interest to the occasion. 
The satisfaction of the people with the celebration, in all its pares, 
seemed to be universal. 

The hall was appropriatedly decorated for the occasion. On the- 
wall in rear of the stage was the inscription, in elegant design, " Semi- 
centennial " and below it a field of blue, on eanvas. Suspended over 
the front of the stage was an ornamental device bearing the word, 
" Lowell," capped with the figures * : 1876," and below it, on either side, 
the figures, " 1826," and "1836." Surmounting this device was an 
eagle. From the centre of the ceiling streamers of red, white 
and blue radiated to different portions of the hall, forming a canopy of 
the national colors. Flags- of all nations were displayed, one from 
each of the iron posts in the gallery. On the gallery front were the 
words " Chelmsford," " Dracut " " Tewksbury," and the three towns 
from which the present territory of Lowell was taken. On the north- 
erly wall was the inscription " Liberty and Union, now and forever ' 7 
@ne and inseparable. 1776-1876." 

James M. W. Yekrixgtow, of Chelsea, reported phonographi- 
eally the addresses of Mr. Cudworth, Mr. Kimball, Mr. Lowell, 
Blshop Clark, Mr. Wilder and Br. Mixer, together with the in- 
troductory remarks of the President The oration of Gexeral But- 
ler and the address of Dr. Greex were delivered from printed slips, 
and are here reproduced in their order precisely as they were spoken- 
The other discourses are printed as revised by the respective speakers 
from Mr. Yehrixgtox's noi.es. 



SEMICENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 15 

Ait the annual meeting of the Old Residents' Historical Associa- 
tion, on May 2d, the venerable President of that body thus referred to 
these commemorative services : — 

" But the crowning event of the year has been the Semi-Centen- 
aial Celebration. At our meeting lait November, the approach of the 
event was announced and a resolution introduced, passed and sent to 
the City Council, expressing our earnest wish for a suitable observance 
of the day. It met with a gratifying reception, and a joint committee 
of the Council and the Association addressed themselves with extra- 
ordinary zeal, judgment and perseverance to perfecting arrangements 
in great detail for the day. Few persons are aware of the importance; 
and labor of such undertakings. While all clashes of the community 
seemed to be aroused, the "Old Residents'" evidently regarded it as 
their last opportunity. The sight of hundreds of their grey heads, as 
viewed from the galleries in the. hall, is described a? singularly 
impressive. Our large and beautiful hall was densely packed, and 
hundreds were unable to gain admittance. 

We were singularly fortunate in our dignified and graceful presi- 
dent of the day, in the appropriate and exhilarating character of our 
choral music, in the almost world-wide fame of the semi-centennial 
orator, in our distinguished guests from abroad, and cheered with the 
happy greetings of former friends who came long journeys to grace our 
jubilee. The day realized the era of good feelings and left behind it 
no causes of regret for omissions or mistakes , and the forthcoming 
history of it, to be published by the city, will commemorate to distant 
ages one of the most successful and happy ceremonies it has ever 
undertaken. In this connection, I may add that eleven odes and 
poems were sent to your committee, from which selection was made." 



M0RX1XG DISCOURSES, 



The P'rcsideizt. — Ladies and Gentlemen, and Scholars of the 
Lowell Schools : — «To have all song and not some praise, perhaps, would 
weary you ; and therefore your committee considered that it would be- 
instructive as well as entertaining to the scliolars of our Lowell schools 
to hear from one who formerly lived in our midst and attended our 
schools. 1 have therefore tire pleasure of introducing to you the Rev, 
W Ami en IL Cubwohtii, of Boston, formerly a Lowell boy, 

ADDRESS 

By Rev. Wauren H. Oudwokth. 

Mr. Mayor, Lndies and Gentlemen and Young Friends.— You 
nave been breathing an atmosphere of music and patriotic delight for 
1 do not know how loiyg. I only say and think — unfortunate is the 
man who was not born in Lowell, as I was, or Chelmsford. That tell* 
you how old I am. It is not, you know, "once an acorn, always an 
acorn/' but " once an acorn, some time an oak ; " for this principle of 
growth, which we have seen so grandly illustrated in the rise, progress 
and prosperity of Lowell, is a principle that you have only to put into 
the right conditions immediately to see wonderful and delightful re- 
sults, It seems hardly credible, as I look around this audience thie 
morning and am assured by thoi-:e figures [''1826-1876"] that fifty years 
ago today this place was a kind of swamp or an open field, and of the 
thousands and tens of thousands that now occupy the area of comfort- 



MR. CUD WORTH'S ADDRESS. IT 

able homes, happy firesides and crowded school rooms in Lowell, only a 
few hundred then existed, and they had undertaken a task in regard 
to which there was a great deal of uncertainty,, and a great many 
people were ready and willing to say, " There is no money in that ; no 
success in that." It seems hardly credible that such was the case ; yet 
it was verily the case in the history of our city. But the principle of 
growth has been applied to this city ; its conditions have been indus- 
triously and faithfully fulfilled, and behold the result ! The principle 
of growth always vindicates itself when its conditions are wisely, pro- 
perly and thoroughly fulfilled. 

There is the little cotton ball that you take from the Southern 
field, and you put it at first into the gin, and separate the seed from it ; 
and you get all the masses of the fleecy wealth of the South and bind 
them into bales, and they are brought here to Lowell. Is that the end 
of it ? Why it is only the beginning of it. It is just with this raw 
material as it is with the raw materials upon the galleries and behind 
me, — and pretty raw some of it is, I should judge, by these cat-calls. 
You take those bales of cotton into your mills, but the cotton is not at 
once transformed into cloth, to produce the wealth that has made this 
city of comfortable homes, and instructed and brought up so many 
delightful people, — for everybody who lives in Lowell is delightful. 
After the bale is unpacked, the cotton is first carried to the picker- 
room ; and any one who has ever been in a picker-room knows what 
sort of a place it is. I have been there, and rejoice to say it, to-day. 
There it is torn into shreds piled up in fleecy masses. In this dusty, 
noisy place men used to work twelve, fourteen, sixteen hours a day. 
Have you not made some progress, Lowell men ? I think you have 
come down to eight hours a day ; but that, I believe, is the result of 
necessity, not of any preference on the part of the men who own the 
mills. At any rate, there is the cotton. That is not the end of it, as 
you know, it has to be drawn through those torturing cards, and there 
it is again attacked by ten hundred thousand, or I do not know how 
many, little teeth, that tear it and pull it and throw it into little 
masses, and then, you know, it goes into the spinning frame, where it 
is whirled and whirled until at last it is twisted into threads ; and 
then it is carried into the dressing room, and there subjected to 
processes .which are indispensable; and then it is carried to the weav- 
ing room, and there the shuttle flies to and fro, preparing it for use; 
and at last, after it has been through the examiner's hands, it is sent 
away from Lowell to Boston, or some other great center of commerce, 
where it is disposed of, and you can buy it for five, six, or ten cents a 



18 SEMI- CEN1 ENNIAL OF LO WELL. 

yard. But all these processes have to be gone through with this raw 
material, and it re-appears in I will not undertake to say how many 
shapes in this audience to-day, and all over the city, the state, the 
country, the world. It re-appears in the completed and perfected 
article, after it has been subjected to all those torturing and torment- 
ing processes. 

So it is with that wisp of wool, which you would hardly pick up 
in the street, it is so discolored, so tangled, and in such a snarl. And 
yet there are people who live on the corporation over yonder, who pick 
up just such tangles and snarls, and some how or other after subject- 
ing them to various processes, they re-appear in this bunting, and 
re-appear in the clothing that covers us Just so it is with young 
persons. Just so it is with the wood of the forest. So it is with the 
. metal in the mine. So it is with the stone x>r marble in the quarry. 
God does not give us perfected materials , he gives us raw materials. 
He gives us little children, that do not know anything, and your 
Lowell men take them into your schools ; they go through the primary 
school to the grammar school, and from the grammar school to the 
high school, and before they get through there, they are prepared to 
delight us with just such music as we have heard to-day. 

I suppose that a great deal of the credit is due to these German- 
ians, or to Mr. Willey, the conductor. At any rate, it has been a 
noble performance, so far. Perhaps these singers will break down 
before the end, but I do not think they will. It is not the habit of 
the boys and girls of Lowell to break down. Whatever they say they 
will do, they are pretty sure to accomplish. 

I believe it is just as natural to prosper and succeed in this world 
as it is to walk or breathe. God gives us the raw material in the mine 
to work up into machinery that shall transform the cotton from the 
field and the wool from the back of sheep into cloth and bunting, and 
all that makes life delightful, ornate and desirable; and God gives us 
our nature in the raw material (and very raw sometimes it is), in order 
that we may work it up into something that is shapely, serviceable, 
enjoyable, and delightful. And so I say, it is just as natural to 
prosper and succeed in this world, if you will only grow and fulfil the 
conditions of growth, as it is to walk or breathe. 

I remember reading once of a clergyman who used to preach 
" decrees," in a way so positive that his wife considered him to be 
almost a fatalist. He was always saying, " It is decreed so and so, 
and so it must be." One day when he was about leaving home to 
fulfil a frontier missionary engagement, knowing that he must pass 



MR. CUDWORTHS' ADDRESS. 19 

through a forest that was infested with Indians, he took his rifle down 
from its supports, and put it into unusually good order. His wife, 
ohserving this, thought her opportunity had come to rally him upon 
his inconsistency. " My dear," says she, " why do you take down 
your rifle, and put it into unusually good order ? you are all the time 
preaching decrees. Now if it is decreed that you will he shot, that 
rifle won't prevent it ; and if it is not decreed that you shall be shot, 
you don't need that rifle. So why do you take it any way." She 
thought she had him, but she found he had her, — and that is generally 
the case. For he at once replied — " My dear, I understand ; I see it 
all ; but suppose when I went through the forest, I should meet an Tndian, 
and his time had come, and I had not got any rifle, why what on earth 
would the poor fellow do ? You see, my dear, we must do our part 
towards fulfilling the decrees of Providence !" 

That is the doctrine I want to teach you, my young friends. I 
was a little child, like the boys and girls here, 1 won't tell how many 
years ago. I went through the Primary school in Lowell, I went 
through the Grammar school in Lowell, under Mr. Graves, I went to 
the High school, and from there to Phillip's Academy, and then to 
Harvard College and the Divinit} 7 School. I know all about the boys 
and girls of Lowell, and other places, too, and what I want to impress 
upon you is, that it is the will of God that you shall succeed and pros- 
per in this world. It is his desire that you should do something in 
this world to make it and to leave it a great deal better than you found 
it ; and you can do so if you only think so, if you only make up your 
minds to fulfil the pre-requisite conditions. But you must fulfil those 
conditions, which are these : that you must trust God; that you must 
be true ; that you must stand immoveably upon the rock of principle ; 
that you must live for the higher ends of your being. Then you will 
prosper, then you will succeed. 

Three men took a job for four dollars, and the question was how 
to divide the money among them so as to make it equal. There is 
a problem for the boys and girls in arithmetic. Two of the men 
discussed it pro and con a long time. The other said nothing at all, 
— and at last, and that is generally the case, " for speech may be 
silvern, but silence is always golden" — they deferred to him, because 
he had said nothing, and asked him his opinion as to how they could 
make a division. He replied at once, for he had been watching for 
just that opportunity. "It is simple enough — there are two dollars for 
you two, and here are two dollars for me, too." That was his arithme- 
tic. Well, that is the arithmetic of a great many people in this world. 



20 SEMI- CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

and I assure you they never prosper. They may amass wealth; they 
may gain fame ; they may for awhile seem to be the lions of their day ; 
but, public opinion, sooner or later, finds out the man that makes it 
two dollars for himself when he is taking in money, and only one or 
less than one when he is paying away any, and very soon the lion is 
dismissed with a kick. 

Ambitious boys who feel disposed to repine over the obstacles 
they have to surmount ere they rise in the world, should remember 
this — those obstacles are just what you need; they constitute a kind 
of divine spur to progress, so that under the influence of that spur you 
will be able to progress a great deal further and faster than you would 
if you were constanly helped by somebody else. There was a boy, 
who, at the age of ten, was apprentice to a farmer and served out his 
time of apprenticeship. At the end of eleven years of labor, he 
received one yoke of oxen and six sheep, which he sold for eighty-eight 
dollars. That boy did not spend one hundred dollars for himself from 
the time he was born until he was twenty-one years of age. His 
name was Henry Wilson, and he became the Vice President of the 
United States. If it had not been for the obstacles that Henry 
Wilson had to encounter and surmount, he never would have accom- 
plished the glorious work he did. Ambitious boys, think of that ! 

And I am not going to forget you, girls. I cannot forget you, 
because I recall the history of Phcebe and Alice Carey, the daughters 
of a poor farmer in Central New York, who resolved that, in spite of 
the narrow circumstances in which they were bound, they would do 
something grand and noble for humanity. They were compelled to 
melt lard, which they got from the farm, for oil, and they put into it 
strips of rags for a wick, to furnish light. That is a lamp to write 
poetry by ! Yet they did write poetry, and true poetry, too, for they 
put their hearts and souls into every line they wrote. The first six 
months they got only ten dollars from Mr. Bailey, of the "National 
Era," a paper then published in Washington. Ten dollars for six 
months labor ! But they kept on. They were resolved' not to be in- 
timidated by their narrow circumstances, that they would persevere 
and carry out their high purpose ; and they have left poetry which will 
live as long as this English language of ours shall be spoken, and I 
calculate (I have a right to say this to day) that that language will be 
spoken as long as the world stands. Indeed, I am inclined to think 
that it will be, finally, the universal language. I say this, of course, 
with all deference to my German friends who are around and behind 
me. But that is what Phoebe. and Alice Cary did, notwithstanding the 



MR. CUD WORTH'S ADDRESS. 21 

narrow circumstances, in which they were born. So they fulfilled the 
requisite conditions of success. 

How many a Lowell name comes up to me at this time ? First, 
I recall John Neal, the painter. Raw material was he, when he first 
began to think that he would try to draw, and then that he would try 
to color. I suppose that if John Neal lives long enough, he will be 
One of the greatest painters in the world. A Lowell boy, starting as 
raw material, and going on and on, in accordance with the principle 
of growth to which I have referred, until he illustrates the law of 
progress in the department to which he has devoted himself, as Lowell 
illustrates it in the domain of industry, and will illustrate it in the 
domain of art by and by. 

Then there is Rev. Dr. Huntington, son of Dr. Huntington, for 
whom this hall is reared, and your former Mayor, whom so many be- 
fore me knew well as a little boy in school. Then there is Dr. John C. 
Dalton, whose books on medicine, hygiene and physiology it is a per- 
fect delight to any educated man or woman to read. Then there was 
Gustavus V. Fox, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, and another who 
went out as a colonel from New Hampshire, and came back as a general. 
And let me speak with the deepest feeling and with the profoundest 
reverence of those two sons of Judge Abbott, noble young men, who 
would have made their mark in any society, who, when that flag needed 
defenders, buckled on the armor of the soldier, and gave their lives, 
with hundreds of Lowell men, without whose valor, intrepidity, and 
devotion this hall might not have been thronged to-day, as, thank 
God, it is because they were devoted and patriotic, and did their 
duty at the cost of their lives. Every Lowell boy £ taw, whether in 
my own regiment or other regiments, or in the batteries there, I could 
not help greeting with a warm and friendly grasp of the hand, for I 
knew what the spirit of the Lowell boys would be, the spirit of Judge 
Abbott's sons, and other noble and heroic young men, who did their 
best and gave their best to save the Union from destruction. 

I say that all we have to do is to fulfil the conditions of growth, 
and the Lord will do the rest. I have no doubt there are before me 
two or three young persons who read a certain large book, and if that 
is the case, I will ask them to tell me one or two things after I have 
narrated an incident or two in connection with that book, to illustrate 
the principle upon which I am dwelling. There was a shepherd, who 
had a son, ard he sent that son into his field to take care of his flocks 
and the time passed very heavily on his hands. Those sheep were in 



22 SEMICENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

a very orderly and proper condition, and what to do to spend the time 
was the question with him, until at last one day he said, " I will take 
a sling, and sling stones at a mark." So he took a sling, and began 
to sling stones at a mark. If you ever did that, you know the first 
stone you sling almost always goes the other way, because you have 
to get accustomed to that delicate weapon, and so I suppose it was 
with that shepherd boy. But at last, persevering, he came nearer and 
nearer the mark, and that encouraged him, and he kept slinging 
stones day after day, until finally he could hit the mark every time. 
He did not know what he was about, but the Lord knew what he was 
about, for by and by, one of the wars that have existed from the beginn- 
ing of time broke out between his country and another country, and 
the armies of the two countries met to settle the trouble by fighting- 
As they were standing ready for battle, there came out a large fellow, 
who had a spear like a weaver's beam, — and everybody in Lowell 
knows how large a weaver's beam is, — and he had on a coat of mail, 
and a helmet on his head, and sandals on his feet, and a shield so 
large that it took another man to carry it. He came out and chal- 
lenged anybody on the other side to come forth and meet him, and he 
said, " If any one of you whip me, we will be your slaves forever, and 
if I whip him, you shall be our slaves forever." But the men on the 
other side shook and trembled with fear, for he was so large, it seemed 
as if all he had got to do was to put his foot over any one of them, and 
extinguish him on the spot. But it chanced that the father of this 
young man came to him one day and said, " My son, I want you to 
go to the army and carry some loaves that your mother has just baked 
to your brothers in the army." Every soldier here knows how nice it 
is to get a loaf of home-made bread in the army, especially after 
eating hard tack. Well this young man took the loaves of bread, from 
his mother's oven, and carried them to the army, and while he was 
there, this large fellow came out, and repeated his challenge, and the 
men in the army of this young man began to shake and tremble and 
shrink away as usual. But the shepherd boy rode forward and began 
to look him over from head to foot; looked up to see what kind of a 
helmet he had on, and down to see what kind of sandals he had on ; 
and he looked so curious and unterrified, that the people behind began 
to think, " Perhaps he will fight with him." He did not seem to be 
frightened at all. So they went and told the king that a young fellow 
had come out from a sheep field who did not seem to be terrified by 
the giant, and the king sent for him and he was brought into his tent. 
The king asked him if he would go and fight the giant. "Yes," he 



MR. CUD WORTH'S ADDRESS. 23 

said, without any hesitation whatever, certainly he would go and fight 
him, and deliver his country from the peril in which it was at that 
time. So the king put his own armor upon him, put sandals on his 
j feet, and a helmet on his head, and gave him his own sword, and then 
he said, u It is only the destruction of one man." So he went forth, hut 
he had hardly set his foot out of the king's tent, before he felt very 
uncomfortable in that coat of mail ; he had never worn any such thing 
in his life before, so he went back into the tent, and asked the king' to 
let him take off the armor, and as for the sword, he said it might snap 
the moment he struck with it. "I think I have got something," says 
he, " that will answer." The king said, "yes, I have only to lose one 
man.' So he took off the coat of mail, and the helmet and the 
sandals, and bare-headed and bare-footed, with nothing but his shep- 
herd's frock on, and a little bag hung at his side, in which he had put 
a few smooth stones that he had taken out of the brook, he went out to 
meet the giant. Do you wonder that when the giant saw him come 
tripping towards him, and coming nearer and nearer every moment 
he looked with perfect contempt upon him, and wondered what sort of 
a phenomenon it was that was coming out to meet him in that 
way ? But as he came nearer, he saw there was mischief in his eye. 
If you want to know whether a man means mischief or not, look 
him right square in the eye, you can tell at once, for the eye is the 1 
window of the soul. The lips may deceive, the other features may be 
a sort of mask, but if you look at the eye, if there is mischief there, it 
will come right out, and call itself by name. So it was with this 
young man. As he came nearer and nearer to the giant, the giant saw 
there was mischief in that young fellow, and said to himself, "I guess 
I must be ready for him.'' So as he came nearer, he saw him take a 
little piece of leather, with two strings, out of his script or bag, which 
was slung a this side, and then he put a small stone into the bit of 
leather ; and he could not help exclaiming in his wrath, " Am I a dog, 
that you should come out to meet me with stones ? " "I will let you 
know what I have come out to meet you with," says the young man, 
and immediately slung a stone which struck the giant in the forehead, 
and he fell to the earth. Then the young man ran up to him and 
drew his sword out of its scabbard, and cut off his head with his own 
sword. Whowas that young man ? [Several voices] — " David." Why, 
you know all about it ! I don't believe one of these old folks could 
have told me. [Laughter] Now, who was the big fellow ? [ "Goliah. "] 
I am glad you read your Bibles. Bead your Bibles every day. Study 
them. The Bible is the best book on earth. I know, for I have read 



24 bEMl-CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. . 

a great many books. You may ask good Dea. Knowles, and he will 
tell you the same. He has been such a good friend of mine that I 
delight to say it in his presence. You can ask any of the older persons 
here, and they will say, "Read your Bibles." 

Now, here is the point, and I think you will understand it. When 
David was slinging stones at the mark, he did not know what he was 
about. But the Lord knew that every time he hit the mark with one 
of those stones, he was hitting Goliah. And every time, my 
young friends, that you get your grammar lesson, or drawing 
lesson, or any of the lessons that are given you in your school 
perfectly, and recite it well, you are just like David hitting the 
mark with his stones ; and the more you observe the laws of your 
intellectual nature, the more you will grow in knowledge, and the 
more you observe the laws that govern moral qualities, the more your 
moral natures will grow; and at last, when the world comes with its 
burdens, and these are laid on your shoulders, you will be as ready to 
discharge your duty and bear those burdens as David was when the 
Lord put him before Goliah. Although he was bare-headed and bare- 
footed, and had his shepherd's frock on, and nothing but his sling in 
his hand, and his opponent was armed cap a pie, — from head to foot — 
and wielded a mighty sword, and had a spear like a weaver's beam, yet 
in a second he was on his back, and his head was off, because David 
trusted in the Lord, and the lord was with him. If you will observe 
these principles of growth, in perfect truth, you will find that, sooner 
or later, they will produce their results. 

The celebrated Dean Swift was walking on the Phoenix road one 
day, when a shower came up, which troubled him very much. At 
last, he found shelter under a tree, where he found a number of people, 
in some trepidation and embarrassment. They were much disconcer- 
ted because the shower had come up. He saw that one of the girls of 
the party began to cry, her handkerchief was up to her eyes, and 
she was sobbing and crying and taking on in a way that awakened his 
sympathy. So he went up to her and said, " My dear what is the 
matter ? " He found that it was her wedding day, and she had on 
her wedding dress, and was afraid that the rain would take all the 
starch out, and then she could not go to church, and then she could 
not get married, and then she burst into tears afresh. " Never mind," 
said the good Dean, "Iain a clergyman and can marry you just 
where you are." So he put his hand into his pocket and took out 
a prayer-book, and then and there, made them man and wife, and to 
complete the marriage ceremonr, he tore a blank leaf out of his 



MR. CUD WORTH'S ADDRESS. 25 

prayer-book and wrote and signed, then and there, this unique mar- 
riage certificate : 

" Under a tree, in stormy weather, 
I married this man and woman together; 
Let none hut him who rules the thunder, 
Sever this man and woman asunder." 

Well, Dean Swift trusted in Providence, and so he was enabled to 
accomplish that work ; and those people, of course, were a great deal 
better married, then and there, then they would have been, if they 
had gone to church, because the Dean did not charge them any fee, 
and wrote this unique marriage certificate, and enabled me to tell the 
story here. 

Trust, and be true. And, as an illustration of truth, I will tell 
you a story of a little boy who would always tell the truth, and he was 
not George Washington, either; but he would always tell the truth, 
no matter what the occasion might be. He was a very frank, noble 
and generous boy. I guess he was born in Lowell. At any rate, he 
was a delightful boy. A clergyman who had been visiting at the house 
said to him one day, "I have been very much pleased with you since 
I have been in your house, and I want to make you a present before I 
go away. What shall I give you ? " The little fellow had a great 
respect for the cloth, that is, for clergymen, — which is a very proper 
thing — always respect your minister, children. He had great respect 
for the cloth, and thought that it would be proper for him to ask 
for something of a ieligious character, like a Sunday-school book, or a 
praj'er-book, or a Bible, and so he said, " Well sir, I suppose I ought to 
ask for a New Testament, but I know I want a squirt-gun." He told 
the truth, and he got the squirt-gun and the New Testament, too. 
Now, always tell the truth, always trust in God, always observe these 
principles of growth in a pure and proper manner, and you will find, 
when you get to be men and women, and the burdens of mature or 
later life are put upon you, that you can bear them. If there is any 
one in this audience who does not believe that, he reminds me of the 
Irishman's turtle who was de&d without knowing ic. The Irishman, it 
seems, had cut off a turtle's head, and was very much astonished to 
see him wriggling around for several days afterwards, and when he 
manifested his astonishment by exclaiming, "Sure, and he must be 
dead, for how could the crathur live without his head?" And his 
companion said, " Of course he is dead, but the poor crathur isn't sen- 
sible of it." Now I say that every one who does not live for the dev- 
elopment of himself in the best way, for the good of others, and for' 



26 SEMI-CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

the honor of the infinite Father of us all, is dead without knowing it. 
He is dead who does not give his life for others, and live for their 
benefit and advantage. 

" He is dead whose hand is not opened wide 
To help the want of some one or other, 
He doubles the good of his life-long ride 
Who gives his fortunate place to his brother, 
And a thousand million lives are his 
Who carries the world in his sympathies. 

To live is to give, 

To deny is to die. 

The flower shines not for itself at all, 
Its joy is the joy it freely diffuses, 
Of beauty and balm it is prodigal, 
And it lives in the life it sweetly loses, 
No choice for the rose, but glory or doom, 
To exhale or smother, to wither or bloom. 

To live is to give, 

To deny is to die. 

Forever the sun is pouring his gold 

On a hundred worlds that beg and borrow; 

His warmth he squanders on summits cold, 

His wealth on the houses of want and sorrow ; 

To deny his largess of precious light 

Is to bury himself in eternal night. 

To live is to give, 

To deny is to die. 

The sea lends silvery rain to the land, 
The land its saphire streams to the ocean ; 
The heart sends blood to the brain of command; 
The brain to the heart its lightning motion; 
And ever and ever we yield our breath 
Till the mirror is dry, and images death. 

To live is to give, 

To deny is to die. 

Throw gold on the far-dispensing wave, 

And your ships sail home with tons of treasure, 

Care not for comfort, all hardship brave, 

And evening and age shall sup with pleasure ; 

Fling health to the sunshine, breeze and rain, 

And roses come back to the cheek again. 

To live is to give, 

To deny is to die." 



MR. KIMBALL'S ADDRESS. 27 

The .President. — Now Ladies and Gentlemen, and Scholars of 
the Lowell High School, I can remember, when myself perhaps as 
young as the youngest here, that a gentleman came to me, and, looking 
down into my face, and putting his hand on my head, said, "Young 
man, 1 hope some day that you will give a good account of your 
time." And I remember my dear mother held up to me, as an exam- 
ple, the gentleman who is now to address you. I cannot introduce him 
better to you, than in the language of the poet, speaking of the mag- 
nificent river that flows along our borders : 

(i Though deep, yet clear, though gentle, yet not dull, 
Strong without rage, without overflowing, full." 

ADDRESS 

By Jonathan Kimball, Superintendent of Public Schools, 
Chelsea, Mass. 

Ladies and Gentlemen, Citizens of Lowell and Children of the 
Public Schools. — The vast size of this room, the number of active, 
lively faces which form its circle, the yet lingering strains of music, 
as well as these gorgeous decorations above us, significant of the fact, 
that the nations of the world have their representatives, silent, if not 
speaking here, remind me, and I suppose remind you, that this is 
what you might call in Lowell a gala day. It is a gala day when one 
after long experience in life, comes to celebrate his silver or his golden 
wedding. It is a gala day when cities, which have a longer being 
than the inhabitants who compose them, set apart a day to commemo- 
rate their birth, and make the most of it as a day of rejoicing. 

I am here to-day, at the request of your committee, for the purpose 
of saying a word on an occasion, which, to me, is one of great pleasure ; 
for, of course, those who have known me formerly, will remember that 
my life runs back so far as to have ante-dated the birth of this large 
and prosperous city. might almost call the Merrimack my native 
river. I might, perhaps, with propriety, quote the language of Whit- 
tier himself, when he speaks of that sweetly flowing stream, " Whose 
valley the sunset fills," for the first sunset that ever made an impress- 
ion upon my spirit, was made across the waters of the Merrimack, and 
the first steps it was my privilege to take upon earth, remembering 
them, were taken in your streets, by the side of your streams and 
through your forests, or wending my way, not "like snail, unwillingly 
to school," but joyfully, eagerly. 



28 SEMICENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

But this is not an occasion to indulge at any length in reminiscenses 
of the past. Here is Lowell ; I need not say " Behold her ! Judge for 
yourselves!" For you old citizens, and you young citizens to come, 
know Lowell far better thnn I do or can, or than any of us can that 
have been exiled any length of time. But here she is, behold her ! 
She owes her sticcess, she owes this great gathering which we have to- 
day of those called together to commemorate her fiftieth anniversary, 
to certain facts. First, the fact of situation. There are few cities so 
favorably located for manufacturing purposes, as it were by the hand 
of God, as the city of Lowell. She had a history even before the abo- 
-rigines left her territory, or Chelmsford received its name. 

She had the most convenient river of New England ; the best water- 
fall that could be culled out of all its numerous descents ; and from the 
capital which was early attracted here, and the foresight which guided 
that capital and directed it — as capital, I am sorry to say, is not always 
directed — to reasonable, just, far sighted and moral ends, she has had a 
reputation and a history from the begining which haye been things to 
speak about and be proud of, and very few of those drawbacks which 
belong to some enterprises inagurated and carried on, giving fame or 
infamy to other places and other cities. I think, as one of the citizens 
of Lowell, I may say, if you will allow me to call myself a fellow-citizen, 
that we owe a great deal to this situation and to this employment of 
capital. 

I am reminded that in recent days, capitol and labor have been at- 
tempted to be made antagonistic ; that there have been " strikes ; " that 
individuals, sometimes forgetting their actual situation, and sometimes 
attributing motives to others which they would be unwilling to have 
attributed to themselves, and sometimes, with just reason, having com- 
plained of those from whom they received employment, have been 
so unwise and injudicious as to attempt to set at variance the water 
and the wheel, and to attempt to produce results by one without the 
aid of the other. 

Lowell, too, has been fortunate in the character of the men who 
founded it. I have been very much interested in thinking over my 
boyish reminiscences of the men who started the business of manufac- 
turing in this locality. I can remember, perfectly well, the tall, and 
stalwart form of Boott, the first citizen of New England at the time, 
owing to his connection with this growing enterprise. He always 
climbed the ladders where his men were at work, with his arms at full 
length, never bending the elbow, holding himself back in such a posi- 
tion that he could see the end from the beginning ; and the man who 



MR. KIMBALL'S ADDRESS. 29 

physically sees the end from the beginning, or attempts it, is very 
likely, mentally and morally, to see the end from the beginning. I do 
not know whether he did or not, but his foresight and far-reaching 
vigilance did very much toward the development of this city. 

I must not dwell upon these matters of reminiscence ; but what 
is Lowell ? Because when an enterprise is created, through agencies 
of whatever kind, and yet it results in nothing, we are very apt to say, 
according to the Latin verse, 

" De nihilo nihil, in nihihim nil posse reverti" 

and when you get nothing out of much, the remark is still more forci- 
ble. Lowell has something to show. She has her results, and she 
shows them in the civil institutions which she has reared, under the 
government of the people, supported by the strength, and buttressed 
by the intelligence, and made inexpugnable by the will of the people 
who have founded the constitution under which she has lived. She 
has had institutions, without which the inhabitants to-daj, would not 
be the inhabitants they are. Early in her history, I can recall very 
well, without having had any particular familiarity with them, the 
interest that was evinced by the leading men of the city in those insti- 
tutions. They have grown like the grain of mustard seed in the Gos- 
pel, until they have made this city a mighty tree, bearing fruit every 
day, and fruits not to be disregarded. She has had industrial institu- 
tions that have lined the shores of your rivers with splendid mills, that 
have driven the fish from j^our waters, that have leveled hills and 
filled up valleys, that have gone northward and eastward and south- 
ward, until they are the boast of Lowell. "Whatever of beauty she 
possesses from the hand of Nature, whatever attractiveness she presents 
to coming residents, and to those who shall first see the light within 
her limits, will be enhanced, further, by civil and religious privileges 
such as have made her distinguished, and upon which I would gladly 
enlarge were I not admonished that gratitude has its limits as well as 
its promptings. 

Lastly, and important, among all others she has reared educational 
institutions, in which I may say, as one of this army of teachers, one 
having a sympathy with the subject, one knowing many of those who are 
amongst you, and as one having long been with you, I feel a sincere 
pride. I love Low r ell for her educational institutions. To dwell upon 
them in detail would be out of place, to dwell upon them in detail 
would be harassing to your patience ; but it is a pleasing thought, — I 
feel it as an old man, who has been a boy, and has travelled step by 



30 SEMI-CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

step, as my friend who preceded me in speaking has said, through their 
different grades. I feel a gratitude for them which cannot be ex- 
pressed in language, cannot he expressed in any form which I can 
adopt. They have given the children of the past, — inferior, perhaps, 
as you of the present would consider them, — they have given the chil- 
dren of the past an opportunity of crossing that vast chasm that inter- 
venes between knowledge and ignorance ; they have given the chil- 
dren of the past, who otherwise might have wandered in the deserts 
east of Africa, an oportunity to cross the river and enter the promised 
land. The}' have given the children of the past the means of starting 
at the beginning, and going on to see how much rests in the power of 
early education. Thanks to the Fathers of the city, thatiks to those 
who early with enlightened minds, saw what a population like this 
needed, and walking in the light of what they saw, gave us the insti- 
tutions under which we have grown up, and which have made us, with 
capital, situation and skill, what we are. They have given us that, 
for which we have reason to be grateful. I take this opportunity, on 
the fiftieth anniversary of the City of Lowell, and the year, I believe, 
which commemorates its fiftieth annual school report, to say that it is 
this invincible power of education, which grasping the raw material of 
the human mind, and, step by step, slowly disentangling its crooked 
natural tendencies, separating out the fibres, which were otherwise rolled 
together, until they scarcely had form or comliness, has given the 
communities that have possessed the advantages of that power, an op- 
portunity to stand up and produce the men whom we love and honor. 

I am afraid that, with the garrulity of an old teacher, I am talk- 
ing too long on this matter of education ; but it is one that has been 
near my heart ever since I received some of its advantages, ever since 
it aided me to speak, think and work, and this tribute is properly its 
due. 

I read last evening a few lines in a book having reference to old 
cities, and it occurred to me this morning, as I was passing along, to 
inquire what would be the probable impression that would cross the 
mind of one who in years to come should view the memorials of this 
city. A man who to-day stands at the entrance of the Temple of 
Luxor, in Egypt, runs his eye along an avenue of sphinxes, passes 
through it, and praises the architect and the power that raised those 
mighty columns which have been, for so many centuries, the wonder 
of the world. But when he gets to the end, he finds himself amid a 
' vast idolatrous temple, where heathen gods, " full of rage, revenge 
and lust," with their stolid faces and gloomy eyes looked down 



MR. KIMBALL'S ADDRESS. 31 

upon imagined worshippers thirty or forty generations ago. Who are 
to read our ruins ? Who are to recall the institutions, and the habits 
of thought and life of the people who filled the streets of Lowell, its 
schools and manufactories, for the past fifty years? What will they 
say of us ? How idle it is for us to prophecy; and yet how unwise not 
to attempt, from our knowledge of the present, to forecast, to some ex- 
tent, the future. When the column of knowlege is once reared upon 
the plain of human thought and human affection, when the column of 
industry is reared there, when the column of virtue is reared there, 
and when upon these columns you have placed the arch of relig- 
ion, morality and high purity, you have laid foundations, raised 
pillars, and built structures destined to be more indestructible than 
those which, in their ruins, raise such emotions of wonder and awe on 
the banks of the Euphrates and the Nile. I love to think of Lowell 
not only as having within itself the elements of those triumphal 
arches which the people of future times shall read, and not wonder to 
what manner of men they belonged, not marvel by what skill they 
were raised, not be astonished at the inscriptions which are to be read 
upon them. They will read them without the aid of any Champollion 
to interpret them ; they will read them with eyes that belong to intel- 
ligent men and women, and will be gratified to say, that whatever 
changes may have taken place in the institutions of this country, there 
once dwelt in the angle of the Merrimack a people of high industry 
and high practical art, who yet never forgot that upon general educa- 
tion depend general morality and general prosperity. 



The Chairman of the Committee of Arrangements. — In addition 
to the two gentlemen who have already spoken, the Committee of 
Arrangements invited as a third speaker, this morning, the Rev. Dr, 
Huntington, to whom Mr. Cud worth has alluded, one of the sons of 
the late Dr. Elisha Huntington, who filled during nine annual terms 
the office of Maj^or of the city of Lowell. Nothing but his supreme 
regard for his own parish and his parochial duties, (which also led him 
to decline the mitre which was offered to him, a few months ago, by 
the Diocese of Iowa,) has prevented him from being with us to-clay a 
His letter in reply to our invitation reads as follows : — 



32 SEMICENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

Worcester, Feb. 5, 1876. 

My Dear Sir: — An imperative engagement obliges me to be at 
home in Worcester on the first of March. Otherwise nothing would 
give me greater pleasure than to be at home in Lowell on that day. 
I beg to thank you and your associates on the Committee for the 
offered privilege of addressing the children of the schools. That I 
owe the honor of receiving this appointment to the circumstance of 
my having been the son of an "old resident," in no degree diminishes 
my sense of your kindness ; for it touches my feelings very deeply to be 
thus assured that my father's name is still held in affectionate remem- 
brance in the city which it was always his delight to serve. 

I have lived now a long while away from Lowell, but nothing shall 
ever persuade me that anywhere else there are public buildings so im- 
posing, walks and rides so attractive, or river scenery so tine as those 
to which my childhood was used. 

My best wish for the young people now growing up amid all these 
advantages, is, that they may appreciate them as warmly as I did when 
I was a boy, and may always feel an honest pride in remembering 
that they were born within sound of the factory bells. 

I am very sincerely and respectfully yours, 

William K. Huntington. 
To Charles Cowley, Esq., Chairman, etc., etc. 



AFTERNOON EXERCISES. 



A stirring overture by the Germania Band, of Boston, (twenty- 
five pieces,) under the leadership of C. H. Eichler, commenced the 
exercises in the afternoon. The Chairman of the Committee of Ar- 
rangements then made the following introductory address. 

REMARKS OF CHARLES COWLEY. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : On the first day of March, 1826, the 
act of the General Court incorporating the town of Lowell received the 
executive approval. At that stroke of Governor Lincoln's pen, Lowell 
started into municipal life. In view of the approach of this fiftieth 
anniversary of that event, the City Council, some months ago, resolved 
to invite the inhabitants of Lowell, past and present, to assemble at 
this time and place in celebration of the day, and committed to myself 
and others the duty of making arrangements for proceedings suited to 
such an occasion. How well this project for commemorative services 
was received, this thronged audience sufficiently attests. The responses 
made to the Committee of Arrangements by all whom we have invited 
to assist in the exercises of to-day, have been most gratifying, indica- 
ting that our invitations were regarded as having, (to use the words 
of General Cushing on another occasion,) "the double force of a com- 
mand to be obeyed in dutiful gratitude, and of a summons to the en- 
joyment of exquisite gratification." 

It belongs to other tongues than mine to lead your meditations 
over this retrospect of fifty eventful years; and you have doubtless 
learned already, from the printed programmes and from the public 



34 SEMICENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

press, "what trained and richly endowed intellects have been secured as 
contributors to your instruction and enjoyment to-day. I thank them 
for their readiness to augment the interest of this occasion by contri- 
butions from their stores of personal recollections, local traditions, and 
general knowledge and eloquence. And now, unwilling to detain you 
with any further introductory remarks, I introduce to 3-ou the Hon. 
Charles A. Stott, Mayor of Lowell, as President of the Day. 



ADDRESS OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE DAY. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : Fifty years ago the inhabitants of that 
part of Chelmsford situated at the junction of the Concord with the 
Merrimack river (and numbering about 25C0) finding that they were 
not being justly dealt with by the mother town, and feeling that their 
wants would be better cared for under a separate government, peti- 
tioned the General Court to be incorporated into a town by the name 
of Lowell. The prayer of the petitioners was granted and we meet 
to-day to celebrate by appropriate ceremonies the fiftieth anniversary 
of that event. 

" Invention came with eagle eye, 

And science smiled where savage war-fires blazed." 

In behalf of the City Council I extend a cordial greeting and wel- 
come to every returning son and daughter of Lowell. Welcome, back 
to the scenes of your childhood and early life, to join with us in cele- 
brating the semi-centennial of our existence as a town and city. Wel- 
come, you who have lingered by the old hearthstone while others 
wandered far away. Welcome, you who have from time to time, cast 
your lot with us although not to the "manor born." Welcome, thrice 
welcome, all who meet with us to celebrate our natal day, and at the 
" table of memory to banquet " upon the recollections of the past. 

How prophetic the language of the great chief of the Pawtuckets, 
uttered more than two hundred 3'ears ago, when in transferring his 
authority to his son he exclaimed, "The Great Spirit whispers to me, 
'Tell your people peace, peace is the only hope of your race. I have 
given fire and thunder to the pale-faces as weapons. I have made them 
plentier than the leaves of the forest, and still they shall increase. 
These meadows they shall turn with the plough ; these forests shall fall 
by the axe; the pale faces shall live upon your hunting grounds, and 
make their villages upon your fishing places.' " How fully has this 



MAYOR STOTT'S ADDRESS. 35 

prediction been realized ! To-day we are assembled upon wbat was once 
their happy hunting grounds; " here the Indian hunter pursued the 
panting deer ; here the council fire glared upon the wise and daring ; 
here they paddled their light canoe along our rocky shore." 

Not a vestige remains of those who formerly peopled the banks of 
our beautiful river. Instead of the wigwam with its feeble smoke rise 
massive structures, busy with the "whirl of spindle and the clack of 
loom," monuments of man's wise sagacit} 1- and untiring perseverance. 
We meet, my friends, not to listen to elegant and studied oratory, but 
rather to indulge in reminiscences of the past, full of so much to 
gladden the heart, and still there comes a feeling of sadness when we 
look around, and our eye fails to discover the forms of those who were 
dear to us in our childhood and manhood days. 

Where are they ? Some in distant lands, some upon the Pacific 
slope, some in the sunny south, others in the far west, who though not 
present with us in the flesh, I trust are celebrating this day with us in 
spirit. But a far greater number have passed on before, and await our 
coming in the celestial realms above, teaching us the important lesson 
that life is but the threshold to the tomb. 

Oh how pleasant it is to take by the hand those with whom we 
rambled up and down the banks of our beautiful river and feel the 
warm pulsation. of heart to heart; still more pleasant to meet with those 
who fashioned the young mind intellectually and morally ; they who 
patiently but kindly watched over us during our schooldays, ever ready 
to assist us in our difficult problems, and to make the path to wisdom 
easy to our feeble steps ; and as well those who from week to week 
directed our thoughts to that better life, and counselled us to walk in 
the fear of God, and to practice his precepts. To those dear friends of 
our youth we can only say, God bless you, the seed which you must 
have thought fell in stony ground, I trust has found root in many of 
our hearts. 

The Eev. Theodore Edson, S. T. D., the venerable Rector of St. 
Anne's Church, and Chaplain of the Day, then read the Litany from 
the Book of Common Prayer, the responses being sung by St. Anne's 
Choir, consisting of Mrs. Mary E. Bix, soprano, Miss Abby J. Owen, 
alto, William Wirt, tenor, and Frank W. S. Daly, basso, under the 
direction of Benjamin Walker, organist and musical director of St. 
Anne's Church. The Litany was supplemented by the following 
prayer, by the Chaplain : 



36 SEMICENTENNIAL OF LOWELL 

Lord, our Heavenly Father, the High and Mighty Ruler of the 
Universe, Who dost from Thy throne behold all the dwellers upon 
earth ; most heartily we beseech Thee with Thy favor to behold and 
bless Thy servants, the President of these United States and all others 
in authority — the Governor of this Commonwealth and all holding 
office and position under him — the head of this municipality and all 
joined with him in the administration of the same. Let the shining 
of Thy countenance lighten our beloved city. May we remember 
gratefully Thy fatherly hand in its early and rapid growth, the direc- 
tion which Thy good Providence did give to its moulding and shaping 
influences, through successive years developing characteristic features, 
bringing out and guiding popular energies to the securing of great 
interests and establishing important institutions. And we humbly 
pray that as in the past up to this marked moment of our community, 
so in the future, through periods of lesser or larger cycles Thy favored 
people may rejoice in Divine goodness; that parents and children, 
from generation to generation trained in the fear of God and in the 
blessedness of His love may be gathered into the heavenly city of His 
eternal and everlasting kingdom, through Jesus Christ, our Lord. 
Amen. 



The President. — Ladies and Gentlemen, the Orator of the Day 
needs no introduction to a Lowell audience. It is sufficient for me 
merely to announce Major-General Butler. 



ORATION 

By Ho:sr. B. P. Butler. 



My Priends and Neighbors : On this half-centennial anniversary 
of the incorporation of our city as a municipality, I have been compli- 
mented by the invitation of your committee of arrangements to give 
you some reminiscences of the growth and early condition of our city 
and the men who made it what it is. The reason of this choice I as- 
sume to be that my coming here was nearer fifty years ago than that 
of any one else who would undertake the task. 

Your attention is therefore invited neither to an oration, could I 
make one, nor an essay, philosophical or other. 



GEN. BUTLER'S ORATION. 37 

Forty-eight years ago, less forty clays, a slender boy of less than 
ten years with a foxskin cap closely drawn over his ears, linsey-woolsey 
jacket, tightly buttoned to his throat, from New Hampshire, came 
walking along the winding road that then led over Christian Hill, in 
Dracut, from Methuen, one cloudless spring afternoon, keeping pace 
with a country sleigh drawn by a jaded and slow-pacing horse, picking 
his way from snowdrift to snowdrift, which alternated with bare spots, 
denuded by the earl} 7 rains, not driven by, but dragging an elderly 
man who solaced himself and steadied his nerves, set all tingling by 
the excruciating creaking of the steel-shod runners as they struck fire 
on the granite pebbles quite often, with huge pinches of y el low snuff. 

As the boy reached the crest of Christian Hill, just at the right of 
the reservoir, the panorama of the valley at the confluence at the Con- 
cord and Merrimac rivers spread out before him, glistened in the sun- 
light, so that the picture is nearly as vivid now to his memory as when 
it first struck his wondering eyes. 

If those who came here long afterwards or were born here would 
like to know how our present populous, well-built, flourishing city, sec- 
ond in importance only to the capital of the state, then looked, I will 
try to sketch the picture. 

Far up the river to the right, glimpse was caught of a cluster of 
low, wooden buildings around the head of Pawtucket bridge which 
spanned the river over low piers showing just above the swift whirling 
mass of waters unseen because of the fringe of trees bordering the 
northern river-bank. Next stood in bold relief the building known as 
the " stone house," with its open verandahs next to, and commanding 
a beautiful view of, the falls, now enlarged and improved, the residence 
of our enterprising fellow-citizen, Doctor Ayer. 

To the left a group of huts, part with mud walls roofed with slabs, 
with here and there a small white frame house. Near them stood, at 
a place called the "Acre" afterwards (because the subject of an almost 
interminable litigation) surrounding the spot where now the magnifi- 
cent edifice of the first Catholic church rears its illuminated cross for 
the adoration of its worshippers. 

With the exception of an old, weather-beaten frame house, then 
and now standing near the water at the foot of the falls, no building 
caught the eye till it met a few straggling ones surmounted by the 
spire of the First Congregational Church. 

Nearly in line were seen three small, and what would now be 
deemed insignificant brick mills of the Merrimack corporation, flanked 



38 SEMICENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

by two rows of detached two- story buildings, the boarding houses of 
the American portion of its operatives, while behind it ran a long row 
of one-story brick cottages then known as "John Bull's Row," because 
the homes of the block printers who had been imported from England 
to finish the then new and almost unknown fabric, American calico. 

At the head of this row stood the house of John Dinely Prince, 
who had shortly before come to tin's country, by his skill to perfect the 
" Merrimack Prints," now the exemplar and pattern of all that class of 
manufactures in the United States, and the foundation of the prosperity 
of that most successful enterprise. 

Further on could be discerned the house of Paul Moody, to whose 
business sagacity, ripe judgment and mechanical skill Lowell is more 
largely indebted perhaps than to anjr other, with a single exception, 
for its existence. 

Still further to the left another cluster of cottages near another 
brick mill stood the homes of the machinists who in the Lowell Ma- 
chine shop made the first cotton machinery, which has laid the foun- 
dation cf the life and prosperity of our city, and in which were after- 
wards built the first locomotives that were made in this country. 

Just beyond a little brick building with a tiny cupola, lay nestled 
among the forest trees near the present Northern depot, the Lowell 
Brewery, a prime necessity, because where, there are Englishmen there 
must be beer. 

The next line of the vista showed St. Anne's Church and parson- 
age, flanked on the left by a row of small ten foot wooden buildings on 
the south side of Merrimack Street, being the only buildings on Mer- 
rimack or Central Street, down to Middle Street, not then even marked 
out. Further along the same line, but a little below it, was seen a low 
brick house, still standing, at the junction of Middle and Central 
Streets. 

Casting the eye a little further to the left it encountered the long 
snake-like-looking structure spanning the river, the then " Central 
Bridge," with one or two small frame houses near it on the Dracut 
side of the river, and beyond stood a white wooden villa, then the resi- 
dence of Kirk Boott, occupying the site of the present Boot Corpora- 
tion, with a large garden running back to the river, the front with a 
very considerable lawn before it, being very nearly opposite Central 
Street. 

Still further to the left on a high bluff of sand occupying the point 
of land between the bridge and the junction of the Concord Biver stood 



GEN. BUTLER'S ORATION. 39 

another tavern, known as the " Mansion House," then I believe in 
charge of our respected, honored, and aged fellow citizen, who may be 
said to be, so far as age and ownership of the soil gives title, the only 
living father of Lowell, Jonathan Tyler. 

As the eye passed on it took in two mills of the Hamilton Corpo- 
ration with two blocks of boarding houses in front of them. Then 
parsing the glaiic3 up Central Street cam.3 a row of small wooden 
buildings on the easterly side of that street, there being only a pole 
fence protecting a line of white birch and alder bushes on the other. 

The eye struck a few w r ooden frame building? clustered nearly 
around a small white chapel, which was the first Methodist Church, 
which gave its name to Chapel Hill. 

Still further to the left is a small brick building, being the first 
considerable woolen mill in the state, occupying the site of the Middle- 
sex Mills, and a somewhat larger wooden building, which is still in ex- 
istence, at the Wamesit Power Company, where a grove of trees then 
hid the powder establishment of Oliver M. Whipple, the view being 
broken by Ira F rye's tavern, now the " American House," and by Levi 
Carter's tavern, now the "Washington House," and the brick building 
adjoining thereto. 

The First Baptist Church stood out by itself in an open lot a little 
further to the left where the Rev. Mr. Freeman w T as then preaching 
his trial sermons prior to his installation in the following June. 

Further to the left was seen the bridge across the Concord River 
with a few straggling buildings near it on the Belvidere side, one of 
which is the present brick building now standing next the bridge, and 
some small work-shops not to be dignified by the name of factories, 
where the Belvidere Manufacturing Company's buildings now stand 
and a few scattered frame buildings around them. 

On the bluff above, where St. John's Hospital stands, towered the 
commanding residence of Judge Livermore, with a well kept lawn be- 
fore it adorned with poplars. Then the view became lost in the magni- 
ficent woodlands that covered Resevoir Hill, and extended far down 
into Tewksbury where now are some of the most elegant residences of 
our city. 

Such was the panoramic view of your infant city as it burst upon the 
eye of the astonished boy. By far the largest town he had ever seen, 
and by far the most magnificent view that had ever greeted his eyes. 
Nor, for beauty of sky shutting down on woodland scenery, for 



40 SEMI-CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

clustering dwellings, for rushing river and whirling waters, never since 
Las a more noble view greeted the eye of the man after nearly fifty 
years. 

Standing as he has lately done upon the same spot and looking 
upon the same sky, with land and water, covered with the population 
and industries of our busy city, the great change that has taken place 
within his memory is scarcely to be realized — a change most interest- 
ing because it is tj'pical of the growth of our country, not more won- 
derful, however, than those upon our western border. 

Then only a small cluster of buildings marked the city of Buffalo. 
A still smaller cluster around the steamboat landing was all there was 
of Cincinnati, and Pittsburgh was known only as a hamlet at the head 
waters of navigation of the Ohio, while at St. Louis, which now claims 
to draw to it the capitol of the nation, consisted in its most important 
features of its buildings built by the French and Spanish habitants of 
Louisiana purchased by our government of Napoleon scarcely twenty- 
five years before, and Chicago the extent of whose commerce and busi- 
ness enterprises threatens soon to rival New York, with a claim to be 
ranked among the first cities of the globe, had hardly a dwelling in it 
more important in comparison with its present palaces, than the bur- 
row of the animal from the Indian appellation of which it is said to 
take its name. 

After a long pause to take the scene, the boy walked on, overtook 
and got into the sleigh at Central Bridge to save his toll, and found 
shelter for the night in the brick building adjacent to Carter's tavern, 
spending the evening in witnessing the legerdemain tricks of one Potter, 
" a slight-of-hand-man." as he was then denominated, of considerable 
local celebrity. But there was nothing so wonderful to him in the 
magician-like tricks of the performer as the boy saw the next morning 
when he went out under a spreading oak tree standing where the 
buildings of " Tower's Corner " now stand and found there displayed 
on a bench on the open shell the first oysters that he ever saw, and 
was informed by the obliging standkeeper in reply to his anxious in- 
quiry what they were for, that they were good to eat. 

The boy bought one oyster and tried the experiment of swallowing 
it which he did not repeat for some years afterwards, satisfied by his 
first experiment that these strange animals were not for his eating. 

All around was vacant open land stretching far away to where the 
Northern Depot now stands. Charles, Summer and Tyler Streets 
were a bog ; and where the canal crosses Central Street so covered 



GEN. BUTLER'S ORATION. 41 

with buildings as to be entirely concealed from view, and running up 
to the present site of the Lowell Company's Works, and covering Mar- 
ket Street, was an open pond, and still further up beyond the Lowell 
Machine Shop, and all that region now filled with busy iudustry a 
swamp which gave the name to tlie locks on the canal there, " Swamp 
Locks " by which they were known for many years after. 

If I have been successful in bringing to your minds, with your 
knowledge of localities, the condition of Lowell forty-eight years ago, 
having within its borders scarcely two thousand souls, you will men- 
tally compare it with its present condition of more than forty thousand 
inhabitants, teeming with its most successful industries, being in fact 
the industrial capital of the state, and perhaps of the nation, speaking 
only of those cities where manuiacturing is alone carried on as the oc- 
cupation of their people. 

What has wrought this change? Its origin was the sagacity and 
foresightedness of a few men. Its completion and fruition, the indus- 
try and thrift of our people, the integrity of our business men, and 
more than all the necessity for leaving here a portion, if only that of 
what is earned by our operatives. 

With the exception of the early investment of capital in mills, and 
machinery, not a tenth of what they now represent, very little money 
has been brought to Lowell. Our city has been a hive of industry, 
and as a rule the honey has been gathered by others. But the early 
business sagacity of the managers of the large manufacturing concerns, 
which required that a sum should be yearly set aside from our earnings 
to make good all depreciation, repair and keep preserved our methods 
of manufacture and machinery in pace with the inventive genius of the 
age, has from time to time caused an extension of our works here so 
that in these same manufacturing establishments, the number of spin- 
dles increased from two hundred to four hundred thousand, or just 
double iu ten years, and all without any investment of capital from 
abroad. Indeed, the great drawback upon the prosperity and growth 
of our city without which it is safe to assume that we should have 
doubled our present wonderful increase, has been thab the owners of 
our mill property here, did not live here, and give our city the advan- 
tage of their expenditure, their public spirit and the investment and 
the rei-nvestment of the money earned by our citizens under their own 
eye, in the place where it was earned. 

Another cause which retarded our prosperity, quite frequently 
overlooked, came in the years 1848-9, and was the discovery of gold 
in California. Those listening to me past the middle age of life who 



42 SEMI- CENTEXNIAL OF LO WELL. 

can throw their minds hack to that period, will rememher that was 
quite the darkest time Lowell has ever known, and for the reason that 
in addition to the fact that the dividends earned here, just alluded to, 
were not spent here the enterprise and spirit of our young men were 
drawn by the stories of fabulous wealth to be had in California. 

During that fever we lost nearly fifteen hundred young and mid- 
dle-aged men, who left us for the golden state, and they were among 
the best, most energetic and most enterprising of our citizens or they 
would not have had the energy to go. 

Assuming for safety's sake in statement that the number is over- 
rated, and that but twelve hundred went in those years, and it would 
be safe to say, that, then averaging the amount of capital they took 
away with them, that one thousand apiece would be a low sum, and it 
will be seen that in addition to the loss of the labor and enterprise of 
these men to our growing city, and the diminution of population by 
the absence of their families, there was an actual withdrawal from us 
of some million and a quarter of capital actually here. 

In spite of these several drawbacks to which I have hinted, I be- 
lieve in the future Lowell can look forward with the brightest hopes of 
prospective increase in wealth and population in a manifold increasing 
ratio, that in two decades more she will double her present population. 

To this view it has been objected that our water power being sub- 
stantially exhausted, Lowell has nearly reached her limit of expansion, 
but this seems erroneous. Other cities have grown quite to rival us in 
some branches of our production, which were not dependent upon 
water power at all. 

Who shall sav that in the next ten years another of God's good 
gifts to man through inventive genius may not be received by the 
finding of a motive power still cheaper and more effective than steam ? 
and in such a case where better than in Lowell can the energies of such 
power for manufacturing purposes be applied ? 

But even if steam shall continue to be the only motive power that 
for a generation may come in competition with water, still, by the 
cheapening of transportation through the net work of railways that now 
centre here, and still more by the use of our river for its pristine pur- 
poses of navigation, which, now improved, connects us with the sea 
with but a single mile of difficulties to be overcome, so that bringing 
here water-borne fuel, and sending away our productions by water on 
the cheap highway of nations, Lowell will be a point at which steam 
power can be had as cheap as the power furnished by the Merrimack 



GEN. BU1LLRS ORATION. 43 

and the Concord, pouring over the falls of their rock} 7 beds, and our city 
with tenfold energy and rapidity will continue on her glorious career 
of prosperity, riches and doubling population. 

In addition to all these, another cause of increase is most surely 
at work. 

Our citizens are now beginning to acquire capital of their own ; 
they are organizing industries fruitful in return to be spent and in- 
vested here, because their owners live here, and the business interests 
outside the great manufacturing in wool and cotton is approximating 
in no slow steps in value to those enterprises upon which Lowell in her 
earlier years solely depended. 

Thus having much more largely in the future the actual results 
of our own earnings to invest and reinvest here; the actual own- 
ers of our capital realizing its results and spending its incomes 
here; turning their thoughts, wishes, hopes and inspirations to- 
ward beautifying their dwellings here; enriching it with grand pub- 
lic buildings filled with beautiful works of art and the treasures 
of libraries, for intellectual culture of their fellow citizens here; and 
dying leaving to our city, and not to some far distant town or college, 
the rich legacies which should cultivate our children and sustain our 
noble charities here, now solely dependent on what can be spared by 
living workmen and women here ; in a word to rid ourselves of absent- 
eeism by a population born here with all their memories of home na- 
tivity and pride of birth place, and desire to perpetuate a family name 
in kind remembrance here ; then shall our beloved city start anew in 
a most majical growth on a renewed career of prosperity that shall 
leave far behind our rivals, Worcester and Fall River, which have al- 
most caught up with us because of their advantages of home capital 
and capitalists which I have sketched, which they have enjoyed and 
we have not, so that our children and their children who shall stand 
here where we now stand, on the next fiftieth anniversary of this day, 
shall with pride and joy hail this city of their nativity and of their 
fathers' homes, as without peer or rival in their affection and love in all 
that civilization may do for man, as well as in power, wealth, popula- 
tion, home and glory as the creation of our industry, and their fathers' 
and their own capital, energy, enterprise and sagacity, as we now give 
grateful credit to those who have gone before us, for what they have so 
wonderfully done under so many and so great difficulties. 

It is but fitting that we should pause here and pay some tribute 
of remembrance to those to whom our beloved city is most indebted, 



44 SEML CENTENNIA L OF LO WE LL. 

although they are so many that hut few within the hour allotted to me 
can be mentioned. 

First and foremost of the remarkable men who were its founders 
Btands the name of Kirk Boott. The owners of the mills at Waltham 
in 1821, were looking about for water-power by which to enlarge their 
means of manufacturing by their system, known as the " Waltham 
System," when their attention was directed by Mr. Paul Moody to the 
Falls of Pawtucket, the water-power of which was then utilized only 
by a dilapidated saw-mill. Civil engineers were sent here to make an 
examination, and reported that there was no water-power here on the 
Merrimack Bivet*. They did not seem even to have examined the Con- 
cord. What were the grounds of that opinion we have no record ; but we 
must remember that hydraulic engineering was then in its very in- 
fancy, and not at all understood as now. 

It is one of the boasts of our city that the Merrimack River water- 
power, and the necessities of its successful development, has trained up 
by skillful pratice added to thorough theoretical education, admittedly 
the first hydraulic engineer in all its branches, that this country has 
produced, and of such sagacity, even in his younger days, as to foresee 
and provide for the contingency that by a sudden and not unprece- 
dented rise of our river the obstructive works might be washed away, 
and the river assume its ancient bed, whose foaming waters can hardly 
be doubted once poured through our most thickly crowded business 
streets. Many years after he enpyed a well earned triumph of his 
profession to see the device he had made brought into active and suc- 
cessful use, turning away the danger from his neighbors, and preserv- 
ing the works under his charge from destruction. 

I have said that the early engineers reported no water-power here, 
and it remained for an English half-pay cavalry officer, wandering 
along the side of our fall, rod in hand, casting the fly for the salmon, 
to discover and appreciate the mechanical force of a river which now 
does the work daily of ten thousand horses with only the expense of 
keeping them in their harness. Kirk Boott reported this view of the 
capabilities of the Merrimack Paver to Patrick T. Jackson, which view 
was confirmed by Paul Moody, and hence we have Lowell and this 
Semi-Centennial Celebration. 

While to the mechanical skill of Mr. Moody and to the executive 
ability of Mr. Boott we are indebted for the inception of our cotton 
manufactures, to the business enterprise of Mr. Thomas Hurd, who did 
not succeed so as to realize the fruit of his labors, we are indebted for 
the woolen manufacture of Lowell. 



GEN. BUTLER'S ORATION. 45 

Let us not forget also that to Claudius Wilson, Alexander Wright 
and Israel Whitney we owe the establishment of the worsted and car- 
pet business here ; the first to any considerable extent in New England 
or the United States, and that here was first planned and put in opera- 
tion the power loom, that most wonderful emanation of human inge- 
nuity for weaving carpet, the product of the genius of E. B. Bigelow. 

But there are other evidences of the sagacity of the founders of 
the " Waltham System," from the effects of which Lowell yet receives 
an impulse, i. e„ the care taken by that sj^stem of the moral, intel- 
lectual and physical welfare of the operatives in their mills. They 
also provided by stringent rules that the moral and phj-sical well-being 
of their operatives should be still under their charge, in a very con- 
siderable degree when not employed in labor. 

The school-house and church went hand in hand with the spinning 
jenny. The first and in that day very large donations of the Merri- 
mack Company and the Locks and Canals Company, the one in build- 
ing and the other in aiding by denoting the site for building the two 
principal churches at that time in the city, St. Anne's Church and the 
First Congregational were the first steps in that policy. 

These cautious and shrewd business men during their lives, looked 
upon the investment in the church as equally profitable to them as the 
investment in the water-power, one supplementing the other, and when 
those that came after them saw fit to take away from the congregation 
worshipping at the church what their fathers had dedicated to God, 
and required that money be paid back into the treasury for the pur- 
pose of dividends, which had once been expended for religious uses, 
there were some who predicted that the time would come when that 
money even would not be sufficient to eke out a dividend to the sons 
of the donors, and without claiming as some perhaps more devout may 
do, that the steady decadence from that time of those dividends until 
they have now stopped was in consequence of the interposition of 
divine wrath for the sacrilege, yet, we can well see that religious 
training, high morals and intelligence have made the very best work- 
king men and women in all grades of industry, and are worth many 
dollars in gold to those who make the most wise use of them, and the 
same improvidence which led to breaking up the skilled organization 
of some of the mills during the war, and leaving their operatives with- 
out employment, in order to sell their cotton as a speculation to supply 
English capital with business was but an exhibition of the same im- 
providence which caused the divorce of our manufacturers from any 



46 SEMI- CENTENNIAL OF LO WELL. 

obligation to aid their operatives in supplying themselves with reli- 
gious culture and teaching. 

Our business had another boast. Nowhere has there been a 
better or more efficient system of public schools from the beginning. 
Each child who has desired a common school education has had it. 

The schools of Lowell have been the foster nurses of men who 
have been and are now carrying on the greatest concerns of the coun- 
try. That many of them are alive, and some in this presence is suffi- 
cient reason for no names being mentioned ; but governors of states, 
skilled engineers, successful conductors of railroads, men energetic and 
successful in every department of business and human industry have 
gone out from our schools, and while I am obliged to advert to the fact 
that in the earlier discussions of the school question, some of the mill 
owners and notably Mr. Boot, agreed with reluctance to the early very 
large expenditures for schools, yet I do so in order to place credit 
where credit is due, and I can do this without breaking the rule that 
I have made to mention no names here in praise or blame of living 
men, because the man to whom the schools of Lowell are more in- 
debted than any other man ; who fostered them, protected them, at 
personal sacrifice in their infancy, who braved the opposition of those 
most powerful in the day when he stood up alone to speak for our 
schools, when the most experienced and able counsel were employed to 
argue against him in the Lowell town meeting ; who twice over car- 
ried the vote, twelve at the first time and thirty-eight majority at the 
second only, by which our school system was in fact established, bears 
a name endeared to us all , by almost patriarchal age, by reverential 
feeling of esteem and love. 

By universal acclaim all agree to the name of Thedore Edson. 

Our city also has been peculiarly fortunate in the attainments of 
its medical profession, and the doctor has been honored here as no- 
where else. Our first mayor was a physician, elected and re-elected as 
long as he would permit us so to do, and the name of Elisha Bartlett 
in my earlier days was a household word for all that was good, pure, 
learned, and intellectual in every walk of life. Subsequently our city 
re-elected Elisha Huntington eight times to be its mayor. I am 
ashamed to say it but we never elected any of our distinguished law- 
yers to serve as ma^yor so long all their terms of service put together, 
as we did this one physician. And yet among our lawyers there were 
" giants in those days." Lawrence, Mann, Williams, Locke, Hopkin- 
son ; Robinson, Wright, Brown, Wentworth, were men whose talents, 



GEN BUTLER'S ORATION. 47 

learning and success would adorn the proudest bar in the United 
States. 

It is to the credit of our citizens that "while they attended to the 
schools they by no means neglected the needs of our young population 
for moral culture. Almost every sect had its church edifice where re- 
ligious instruction according to its tenets was had, and it can safely be 
said that in no town or city of the same number of inhabitants was and 
is there a greater average attendance at church. And this was all the 
more wonderful because these church orginazations had to be carried on 
and churches built by a population, almost every man and woman of 
which were day laborers earning their daily bread, and how freely 
have they given up their limited substance, the many spires and church 
towers that can be counted from the neighboring hills iu every part of 
the city, most fully attest. 

The result has been that no aggregate population of the same 
size has been more noted for its good order, quiet and honest integrity. 
No stupendous crimes, and comparatively but very few of the ordinary 
transgessions have thus far disgraced our town, so that no other city in 
the United States of the same number of inhabitants can show so clean 
a criminal record as ours, and when that record is read the very largest 
portion will be simple breaches of necessary police regulations. 

At a very early day, the very earliest institution of the kind in 
the state or in the country, the " Mechanics' Association " for mutual 
culture and improvement, which still exists with its well stocked 
library, was founded here as well by the liberality of the mill owners 
as the contributions of those who labored. 

The sick and dying have been well cared for. As early as 1837 
the only residence in the city which could by any exaggeration of 
speech be called sumptuous or luxurious was turned into a hospital in 
which the sick and wounded operatives at a nominal price could receive 
medical and surgical treatment under the care of one of the most emi- 
nent surgeons of the United States. 

It was early thought that the large influx of the foreign born 
which our manufacturing necessities brought together here, would be 
detrimental to our growth and prosperity, nay, so that the want of 
good order and an ill disposed element in the city would render it un- 
desirable as a residence. But all this was a mistake. They too have 
built expensive and the most costly church edifices ; have established 
schools for the teaching of their own tenets of religion, and hospitals 
for the care of their sick, and their children are now with us and 



4 8 SEMI- CENTENNIAL OF LO WELL. 

among us and a part of us, some of the most enterprising, reliable and 
honored of our citizens. 

There was another class of men mention of whom must he made. 
Attracted here in our earlier days, men came and set up business for 
themselves, disconnected with our mills, and brought their varied in- 
dustries and interests into our city, which have been the main stay of 
our population, in the vicissitudes of the prosperity of cotton and 
woolen manufacturing. Among them was a young man who came 
here before the incorporation of the town even, the event we cele- 
brate. 

Among the earliest, and at that time some of the very best buil- 
dings, were the fruits of his energy and enterprise. With the keenest 
sagacity he saw early that the future of Lowell depended upon the 
cheapness of transportation to tide- water, and he spent the latter part 
of his life in an endeavor to open such channels of communication and 
to save us from the effects of a single railway, which he believed to be, 
and feared its power as a monopoly. All his honestly acquired and 
hard earned wealth was invested here, and he has left behind him the 
only residence that may be denominated palatial, and extensive busi- 
ness blocks as his monument in Lowell. But he will be remembered 
still longer and more gratefully by us because of his efforts to secure 
the future prosperity of the city of his adoption by given us the benefit 
of cheap transportation, which I have already considered the prime 
necessity of our future growth. To the older citizens I need not call 
his name to bring him up in remembrance, and the younger haA r e 
learned from their fathers to revere the memory of William Livingston, 
as one to whom Lowell owes very much. 

Later came two brothers with their considerable wealth, acquired 
elsewhere, which they invested in buying up the then vacant lands 
east of the Concord River, in lading out streets, erecting buildings, 
and indeed it is not too much to say, being founders of the most beau- 
tiful part of our town, " Belvidere," which they adorned with their own 
residences, then the most considerable in the city, and the younger of 
them introduced and fostered several private manufacturing enterprises 
which we now so well know are so necessary to our growth. He was 
honored by the state with high political preferment, av.d the name of 
Nesmith will hereafter be reckoned among those who were the bene- 
factors of Lowell. 

Still another man with his great energy and skillful business com- 
bination has impressed himself upon a portion of our city. 



GEN. BUTLER'S ORATION. 49 

Coming here a poor hoy from Vermont long hefore the water- 
power "the Merrimack had been utilized, he established a manufac- 
tory of powder at the upper falls of the Concord and carried it on for 
more than twenty years with great success, and with large accretion 
< f wealth to himself, until the growing city had so encroached upon it 
that it was no longer safe; and then by a canal constructed with his 
own private means he so utilized the water-power of the Concord River 
at that point as to develop six hundred more horse power to be used in 
varied manufactures which even in his time had brought to that part 
of the city and connected therewith a larger population and more 
wealth than the whole limits of the city contained at the time of its 
incorporation as a town. Enjoying largely the confidence of his fellow- 
citizens, many times elected to offices in guidance of its affairs, while 
his memory may have passed from the younger portion of our citizens 
yet hereafter there will be found inscribed on the roll of the 
founders of Lowell in no subordinate place the name of Oliver M. 
Whipple. 

The busy hands of the clock warn me that I must pass over the 
many other honored names of esteemed citizens now passed away, who 
deserve honorable mention at this hour and our most grateful remem- 
brance. Tradition, ripening into history, will do justice to their 
memories, and the future historian of Lowell will give them the place 
they most fully deserve. 

There is still another topic which justice to the gallant and noble 
dead will not allow me to pass in silence ; whose deeds throw the most 
brilliant lustre upon the bright escutcheon of the fame of our city. 
While other towns and cities in the County of Middlesex claim the 
high honor of the first blood shed in the war of the Revolution to obtain 
our liberty, Lowell, the younger sister of them all, has the still greater 
glory of the first blood shed in the streets of Baltimore in the war for 
preservation of those liberties and the free government which owes its 
birth to Lexington and Concord. Our city can point with justifiable 
pride to the fact that a regiment of her soldiers were first welcomed at 
the nation's capital as its saviour, and was the first and only, and I 
trust will be the last regiment, who found their bivouac in the Senate 
chamber of the United States. 

Fired by the patriotic examples of these, her patriots, who, as 
minute men, first answered to the call to arms to save the nation's life, 
Lowell poured forth her sons without stint or measure to the armies of 
the Union, so that no considerable battle was fought east of the Al- 
leghanies where the blood of a Lowell soldier was not shed, and no 



60 SEMI-CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

collection of graves of those who died for their country by disease more 
deadly than the bullet, is complete unless it contains the mouldering 
ashes of some son of Lowell, his blood yielded up in behalf of his coun- 
try's life. I need not here call the roll of these our sons and brothers, 
so glorious, not only in our city's own history, but in the history of our 
country. 

Sorrowing hearts of weeping Avives, mothers, daughters, sisters, 
brothers, sons, and fathers have not yet ceased to bleed for the loss of 
their dear ones, who are now remembered in anguish, but whose mem- 
mories will, when the soft touch of the magic hand of time has soothed 
all grief, shine forth with vivid recollection of their valor, their patriot- 
ism and their sacrifices. There is no need of giving their history 
here. Go read the history of your country in the day of its most 
perilous hour, and there their names are inscribed and enshrined for- 
ever. 

Now my task is ended, — imperfectly clone I feel in every part. 
Yet if it has aided to bring to the mind of the young of this assembly 
the names of those whom they and their children should delight to 
honor so that their virtues and example may be transmitted from 
father to son until a future day when those of us who now remember 
them, and were some of us their compeers, have passed from earth, on 
the centennial birth of our town their names may be kept in bright 
remembrance, I shall have accomplished all and more than I hoped. 

More than all besides, let us not forget that those who have gone 
before us have committed as a sacred trust this our beloved city to our 
care, its prosperity to our foresight, energy and integrity. Let us see 
to it that secular and religious teaching shall find the same high place 
and fostering care with us that our predecessors gave to both ; that in- 
tegrity of life, order in business, openhanded and liberal charity, pub- 
lic spirit and patriotism shall be ours as it was theirs ; that we may 
transmit to the next generation, improved, enriched, beautified and 
adorned, a city more prosperous, of more honor to the state and coun- 
try than we received from them, so that he who shall stand in my place 
fifty years hence may have cause to note how we have done our duty 
to our fellow men in the several walks of life to which we are called, as 
I have feebly attempted to do in recalling the memories of some of 
those who have gone before. 



The President. — Mr. Appleton, in his history, says that one day, 
in Boston, he chanced to meet Mr. Boott, and he said to him : "The 



GEN. BUTLER'S ORATION. 51 

Legislature is about to pass a bill for tbe incorporation of our part of 
Cbelmsford, and there is only one thing necessary, — that is, the adop- 
tion of a name ; and there seem to be two names in question, — Lowell 
and Derby." " By all means," said Mr. Appleton, "call it Lowell." 
Ladies and gentlemen, we have here to-day a relative of him for 
whom our city is named, — a son-in-law and nephew of Mr. Francis 
Cabot Lowell, — John A. Lowell, of Boston, who will now address you. 
[ Loud applause.] 

ADDRESS 

By Hon. John A. Lowell. 

I thank you sincerely, ladies and gentlemen, for this cordial wel- 
come, although I am very well aware that it is not because of anything 
I have done in connection with this city, although I was at the head of 
the Boott and Massachusetts Mills, both of which I built. I am aware, 
also, that it is not for the reason that Mr. John Lowell, Jr., who was 
the founder of the Lowell Institute, resided for son e years in this 
town, — first in a stone house on the Merrimack River, and subsequently 
in Belvidere. I am further aware that it is not owing to the fact that 
the second treasurer of the Merrimack Mills, the one who succeeded 
Mr. Boott, Francis Cabot Lowell, was the son and bore the name of 
the person for whom the town was named. I am aware that I am 
indebted for this reception to the interest which some of you may feel 
in the merits and the life of him for whom this city was named. 

Of all the persons who were interested at that time in the buil- 
ding up of this new town of Lowell, I am perhaps the only survivor ; 
at least, the only one with such health as to enable him to participate 
in these proceedings. And although this is the first time I was ever 
on a public platform, — and I hope it will be the last, — I feel that it is 
incumbent on me to at least do as much as to give you some personal 
reminiscences, — reminiscences which very often get considerably al- 
tered as time advances, and the original actors in the events described 
are removed by death. 

For several years prior to 18 12, we had enjoyed in this country 
almost a monopoly of the carrying trade of Europe. We had enjoyed 
it because, owing to the war which existed between Napoleon Bona- 
parte and England, all the ports in Europe had been closed to Great 
Britain. The continental States did not permit the introduction of 



52 SEMI- CENTENN[A[ O" LO WELL. 

English goods, and as England did not like to have any other goods 
entered, she had declared all the seaboard countries of Europe to be 
under blockade. As the quarrel proceeded, the English found that the 
Americans were doing what they thought belonged to them ; that they 
were carrying spices, sugar, coffee, and everything else from the East 
and West Indies to those ports in Europe ; and in order to counteract 
that, the English devised this system, that every vessel that was going 
to any port in Europe from this country should first touch at a British 
port, and there take out a license. Those were the famous " Orders in 
Council " which were passed by England. Napoleon did not like this 
action on the part of England, and therefore passed cestain decrees 
which were well known at that time as the Berlin and Milan decrees. 
Those decrees were, that any vessel that entered any port of Europe 
armed with a British license should have her cargo confiscated. Amer- 
ican commerce was thus placed in a very embarrassing position. If 
our merchants attempted to avoid Scylla, they fell int<> Charybdis. If 
they took an English license, their cargoes were confiscated; if they 
did not take it, the British would not allow them to enter any Euro- 
pean port. That was the state in which our commerce was at that 
time. In New England, it was even worse chan that, for trade was 
going very rapidly away to New York, because, there being no rail- 
roads at that time, the Hudson River, gave great advantages to New 
York. But a young Bostonian, whom nature had designed for a 
statesman, but fortune had made a merchant, was at that time in 
Edinburgh, and he pondered over these things. What was to become 
of this country, especially if the war should last twenty years ? It was 
thought at that time that war would be declared between this country 
and England, and war was declared, in 1812. Napoleon at that time ap- 
peared to be in the zenith of his power. Our Government at Washing- 
ton never dreamed that two years would upset him completely ; there- 
fore they did the wisest thing they could ; they declared war against 
England. This young man of whom I speak pondered these things 
deeply. It was Francis Cabot Lowell, a young man at that time thirty- 
five years of age, whose business had been that of a merchant, but who 
had been driven from his business, at first by the embargo, afterwards 
by the non-intercourse act, and finally, by w<ir. In thinking over 
what could be done to employ the industry of this country, he naturally 
turned his thoughts to the cotton manufacture, which at that time, had 
been greatly developed in England, and had created som* j princely 
fortunes. In fact, it had furnished the backbone of the war. Without 
it, England would not have been able to carry on, almost single- 



MR. LOWELL'S ADDRESS. 53 

handed, the struggle with Napoleon. He thought it was possible that 
that could be introduced into the United States. Certainly it could 
be done, if the war was to last thirty years, as the war in Germany 
had lasted, or even twenty-five like the wars of the Revolution. But 
he was cautious as well, and he said, " Suppose the war do.es not last ; 
suppose it only lasts the time necessary to build a factory and put it 
in operation, and then peace comes," — and that turned out to be the 
fact, — " then what will happen ? " Thinking over that matter; he said 
to himself, — "The English have great advantages ; they have an un- 
limited amount of capital ; they have very cheap labor. How can we 
compete with them? In the first place, we can have joint-stock com- 
panies, and by combining the capital of men of smaller means to- 
geth we can make it equivalent to the capital of one man who is 
very much richer. Then the ingenuity of mj countrymen will enable 
them to invent machinery, which will go far to supersede the necessity 
of having so much labor. Then the raw material can be got much 
more cheaply than in Europe, especially if the war continues." He 
therefore determined that the thing could be done, and lie said it 
should be done. That was the nature of the man. He immediately 
went to work to examine, as far as he was permitted to do, all the 
establishments then existing in England. He went to Manchester 
and other places, and examined carefully their works. There were 
certain things to which he could not obtain access. One was the power 
loom, which had been invented by Cartwright sometime before, and 
which was a monopoly ; no plans of it had been published, and he could 
not get any description of it. He determined, however, that the thing 
could be done. He came out to this country in a cartel, during the 
war, and the first thing he did after arriving here was to take into his 
counsels his brother-in-law, Patrick Tracy Jackson, who, like himself, 
had been driven from commerce, having been a supercargo for a long 
while, by the war. His next step was to engage the services of Paul 
Moody, of Amesbury, who was then well known as a skilful mecha- 
nician. He then went in search of a water-power, and found one that 
suited him at Bemis's Paper Mill, in Waltham, and bought that. It was 
not until he had done all these things that he put himselt into com- 
munication with Mr. Nathan Appleton. He offered Mr, Appleton 
stock to the amount of ten thousand dollars in this new enterprise. Mr. 
Appleton said he could not afford to invest so much as that in so hazard- 
ous an enterprise, but he would take five thousand dollars, which he did. 
The power loom, as I said before, they had no drawings of, and could 
not get at all. It was necessary, therefore, to re-invent it. It was 
necessary, in fact, to re-invent a great deal of the machinery, because 



54 SEMI-CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

they conceived the hold idea of carrying on every process, from the 
first coming in of the cotton to the going out of the finished cloth, in 
one mill, — a thing which had never heen done before. It was therefore 
necessary that all the machinery should be adapted to that purpose. 

Mr. Appleton, in his account of the introduction of the power- 
loom, states that Mr. Lowell, though no mechanic, no mechanician, 
invented that himself. He shut himself up in an upper room in Broad 
Street, hired a man to turn a crank, and there made experiments, day 
after day, week after week, until they were crowned with perfect suc- 
cess. In the meantime, Mr. Paul Moody had heen at work upon the 
rest of the machinery : the throstle-spindle, which it was thought ne- 
cessary to have at that time, on account of the heavy goods it was pro- 
posed to make, — the heavy cottons of Indin ; the double-speeder; the 
drawing-frame, — all these machines were re-invented by Mr. Moody. 
In inventing the double-speeder, which was quite a different machine 
from the English fly-frame, he was obliged to introduce some motion 
which required accurate mathematical calculations. The double-cone 
in that instrument effecting the winding on spools directly, without 
the intervention of any other machine, it became necessary that it 
should be an exactly calculated motion. The calculations for this mo- 
tion were made by Mr. Lowell entirely, and years after, when there 
was a suit in regard to the patent right of the double-speeder, Dr. 
Bowditch, being called in as a witness said he had studied those cal- 
culations with admiration, as they contained some simplifications which 
he had not known before that anybody possessed in the United States 
Such was the character of Mr. Lowell. 

When he came to put his mill in operation at Waltham, there 
was, of course, great rejoicing. When the first pieces of goods were 
turned out, so small was the belief in the possibility of such a thing, 
that they could not be sold in Boston. The dealers said, "No, it can't 
be possible. There is some mistake about it, and we won't buy the 
goods." A few of the goods were put up at auction, and they brought 
something over thirty cents a yard, — which of course was a great 
triumph at that time. 

Mr. Lowell, in addition to that, went into Rhode Island, to see 
what there was there, and what rivalry might be expected from that 
quarter. He found that almost every spindle in Rhode Island was 
stopped. Peace had then taken place, and the introduction of English 
goods was such that every spindle, except a few in Slater's Mill, was 
stopped. Eor at that time, there was no such thing as a mill, as we 
understand it now. They were all merely spinning mills. The prob- 



GEN. BUTLER'S ORATION. 55 

ability is (Mr. Appleton gives that as his opinion, and I have no doubt 
it was so), that the first mill built in Waltham, with 1790 spindles, 
was the only mill, not simply in the United States, but in the world, 
where the cotton was taken in at one end, and turned out finished 
cloth at the other. The whole of that idea was Mr. Lowell's. 

Then Mr. Lowell had another idea in his mind, which was one of 
the greatest importance, and that was the moral and religious instruc- 
tion of the operatives He was going to introduce this business for 
American girls (at that time, we were not overrun with Irish); he 
therefore wished, and thought it necessary, in order to attract that 
class of population, in order to enable parents to feel safe in leaving 
their children at these mills, to institute an entirely new system, dif- 
ferent from the English. In England, and on the continent of Eu- 
rope, the operatives in the mills were sordid, vicious, and every way 
degraded. He determined that it should not be so here, and therefore 
built boarding-houses for the operatives, put them under the care of 
matrons selected for that purpose, allowing no man to sleep under the 
fame roof with them. He also instituted schools that should be free 
for the children of the operatives ; paid their pew taxes, allowing 
them to go to whatever churches they chose. All that system, which 
has been so much admired by every foreigner who has visited this 
country was introduced by Mr Lowell, and Mr. Lowell alone. To that 
Mr. Nathan Appleton bears testimony in his book. He says that Mr. 
Jackson and Mr. Moody were men of unrivalled talent, and of great 
energy, but that Mr. Lowell was the informing soul of the whole pro- 
ceeding. I think that cannot be denied. 

It was only this morning that I received a book containing the 
papers that were read before the Old Residents' Association of this 
city or town, which contains very nearly the same things which I have 
been telling you. There was, however, one thing said there in the 
memoir of Kirk Boott, which I wish to have an opportunity of setting 
you right upon. I refer to the statement, that he, Kirk Boott, was the 
first person who devised the plan of a joint stock company. On that 
subject, the words used are these : "The carrying on of manufactures 
on a large scale by a joint stock company was an experiment that had 
not then been tested." The difficulty about that is, that in the very 
same volume, and but a few pages before, but by a different hand, there 
is an account of Mr. Lowell's first introduction of the cotton manufacture 
at Waltham, the whole of Waltham being made a manufacturing town, 
which overflowed in this direction. They came over here to try to find 
a place where they could extend it. In the article on Mr. Boott 



56 SEMICENTENNIAL OF LOWELL 

the whole of this is completely ignored, and the credit is given to Mr. 
> /Boott as having been the first to introduce into this country the idea 
of joint stock companies, as applied to cotton mills. I saw that state- 
ment only just as I was about taking the cars to come up here. I find, 
however, a sentence a few pages further on in the volume, which I 
thought might well be quoted here, only substituting the name of Mr. 
Lowell for that of Mr. Kirk Boott : " When the thing was to be done 
over again, and an entire manufacturing city ' as to be built, fifteen 
miles north, they had only to improve on his idea. The difference is 
like that between the original invention and subsequent improvement. 
He had no copy to improve upon. He had to think every thing out 
anew ." I think you will agree with me, that after the cotton manu- 
facture had been established at Waltham so successfully that they 
were obliged to move here, not having water-power enough there, it can 
hardly be just to give to another person the credit of all those inven- 
tions that belong to nobody but Francis C. Lowell. I should be the 
last person to say one word in depreciation of Kirk Boott. He was 
my bosomfriend, and I was his trustee. I would not say anything 
to detract from his credit ; but it is no more true, as a matter of fact, 
that he 'made the first experiment in joint stock companies in carrying 
on the cotton manufacture, than it is true that he went out with a fish- 
ing line and found there was a water-power at Chelmsford. I pretend 
to know all about that thing. The first person who suggested this 
_place was Ezra Worthen. Paul Moody knew nothing" al5"dut it. Mr. 
Moody and Mr. J ackson came up afterwards and saw this place. It is 
not true that Mr. Boott was the first to suggest it. So far from 
it, the whole purchase was made of the Pawhicket Canal and of most 
of the farms here before Mr. Kirk Boott had set foot on the spot. Con- 
sequently, it could not have been Mr. Boott who found out the water- 
power. I do not believe that, even in those days of ignorance, any 
ISTew England boy could come to a place where there was a river with 
a thirty-foot fall, and think there was no water-power here. 

Ladies and gentlemen, there are a great many advantages in not 
writing a speech, — and I have not written a word. One advantage is, 
that you can stop when you please, another that you are not likely to 
fall into the error of saying, with the orator of the day, "I am warned 
by the hand on the clock that it is time for me to stop," and that for 
the simple reason that there is no clock in sight.* 

* In a later revision of the foregoing remarks, the following paragraph was added 
by the speaker:—" Francis Cabot Lowell passed the winter of 181 6 in Washington, and 



7 



BISHOP CLARK'S ADDRESS. 57 

ADDRESS 

By Et. Eev. Thomas M. Clark, D. D. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : I have prepared no address for this oc- 
casion, for I knew the distinguished orator of the day well enough to 
feel very certain that anything I might write before hand would be 
anticipated by him, and I am very glad now that I committed nothing 
to paper. 

I look upon the present as a sort of family gathering, and on this 
ground, perhaps, you will excuse me if, in the few remarks I have to 
make, I am somewhat egotistical, and refer to personal matters, which 
might seem somewhat out of taste on a different occasion. 

One of the early recollections of my boyhood takes me back to a 
certain year when my respected father every little while was missing 
from his home in Newburyport, and went off on horseback to Chelms- 
ford, and it was reported that he was passing the season in this region, 
occupying himself in hunting and fishing. I believe there was occa- 
sional^ a poor wretch of a squirrel or rabbit shot and eaten up at 
'Squire Whiting's, at the Falls, but most of the game that was con- 
sumed on those occasions was bought of other people. The real purpos-e 
which he had in hand was the purchase of the land on which this city 
now stands. That was the business in which he was engaged, not the 
shooting of rabbits. Now let me tell you how it happened that he was 
employed in this work. The firm that contracted to build the original 
canal, which, as you all know, was made, not for any purpose of manu- 
facture, but simply to improve the navigation of the Merrimack, failed. 
My father was a clerk in the employ of that firm, and being familiar 
with the work, he was engaged to carry it on, and in the process of 
this branch of business, he became familiar with this whole region; so 
these gentlemen in Boston, of whom you have heard, requested him to 
buy the land in his own name, in order that there might be no sus- 



procured for the protective duty of 6 1-4 cents per square yard, the support of Mr. 
Lowndes and Mr. Calhoun. For ali these services Mr. Lowell asked no compensa- 
tion. His work was now accomplished. He died the following year, at the early age 
of forty-two. And now, ladies and gentlemen, when we consider that, alone in his 
solitary closet, he worked out these splendid results, and by his energy carried them 
forward to perfection, in spite of the incredulity of some and the rivalry of others, 
that he did this with a frame already wasted by disease, — was it not a meet tribute to 
his memory that this city, the fruit and outcoming of his vision, that this Queen of 
manufacturing industry, should bear the name of LOWELL I" 



58 Semi-centennial of low ell. 

picion of the purpose to which it was to be appropriated ; for if it had 
been foreseen that such a city as this was to stand here, the good old 
farmers who ploughed the soil would never have sold their land at any 
reasonable rate, unless human nature was very different then from 
what it is now. There was a great deal of speculation, I have heard 
him saj T , as to the purpose that he had in view in making this pur- 
chase of land. There was a very general impression that he intended 
to set up an enormous tannery here. There was one farmer who be- 
lieved that he was insane, and therefore he was unwillling to take the 
trouble to make the deeds, transferring his farm, until 'Squire Wright 
signed a bond of indemnity, to the amount of two hundred dollars, 
guaranteeing him this sum in case it should turn out that he had taken 
the trouble for nothing. He was firmly satisfied that my father would 
never pay such prices for this land, if he was not insane. But so it 
went on until the whole matter was completed, when he transferred 
the property to the gentlemen in Boston who had employed him to 
make the purchase. 

I have one further reminiscence, of which you will allow me to 
speak, in connection with this subject, and I will then pass on to some- 
thing else. Six or eight years after this city was established, I was 
teaching school here at seven hundred dollars a year. (I think it was 
more than I fairly earned). At that time, my father came to the city, 
and said there was great consternation among the gentlemen who had 
established this place, for it had just then been discovered, for the first 
time, that although they had employed the best legal counsel, and had 
guarded every minor point with great sagacity, they had entirely for- 
gotten to have my mother sign away her right of dower; so that, if my 
father had died at that time, she would have had a claim upon one- 
third of the leal estate of this city ; and as the real estate 
carried the buildings, every structure erected would have been 
affected by this fact. I thought it a little strange that I should 
be earning seven hundred dollars a year under those circumstan- 
ces. I feel honored in saying that the deeds were signed as soon 
as they were made ready, and that no compensation was either 
asked or offered. Perhaps in these times, there would be a little more 
care exercised in such a matter, and some slight matter of fifty or a 
hundred thousand dollars might be asked as a compensation for the 
release ; but in those days, we acted upon somewhat higher principles 
of honor than prevail to-day. 

So much for that. I am sure you will pardon me for having al- 
luded to such personal matters, because there is probably no one else 



REV. MR. CLARK'S ADDRESS. 59 

living that could present some of the facts which I have just now 
narrated. 

In the year 1831, I came to this city, and presented myself at the 
door of my venerable friend, the Rector of St. Anne's Church, as a can- 
didate for the first High School ever established in Massacuusetts, out- 
side of Boston, and perhaps in New England, and through his influ- 
ence, I received the appointment. I entered upon my duties, in a 
little wooden building on the Hamilton Corporation, a building that 
might have cost, I should think, three or four hundred dollars to erect. 
I remember as if it were but yesterday, the snowy November morning 
when I wended nvy way to that little school-house, to enter upon the 
work assigned me. Forty boys and girls, a six-plate stove and a small 
desk crowded the building; and there I worked for a year. I remem- 
ber, as occupying seats in that humble school-house, certain boys whose 
names have since become somewhat famous. On one bench sat the 
orator of the day, and whatever trouble he may have given other peo- 
ple, he never gave me the slightest. Perhaps it was owing to the fact 
that I knew Benjamin F. Butler was a boy who might be led, but 
could not be driven, and I conducted myself accordingly. On another 
bench sat Gov. Straw, of New Hampshire, now present. On another 
bench sat G-ustavus V. Fox, of whom you have all heard, and whose 
noble record during our late war has made him memorable. There were 
others whose names I might mention, who made themselves distin- 
guished in various ways ; some who promised high things, but the rude 
hand of Death swept them off before the flower had had time to ripen 
into fruit. Their memory is blessed. 

And now I desire, on this occasion, to thank my A^enerable father 
for the care and attention that he always showed to those who were in 
the employ of the city as teachers. You are indebted to him more 
than to any man for the educational institutions of this city, in its 
early days. He had some peculiarities. He was wonderfully kind 
and patient with us when we did some very foolish and improper 
things ; and he had a way of visiting the schools, not always on set 
and formal occasions. We did not know exactly when he was coming, 
so that we were not always ready for him. That was a great advan- 
tage. It was a very proper thing to do. I think if inspectors and 
committees of various sorts would look in upon schools and other public 
institutions when they are not expected, they might see some things 
which they never expect to see. 

But I am rambling on perhaps at too great length. I intended to 
say a few things, in a general way, about certain peculiarities of Low- 



60 bEMT- CENTENNIAL OF LO WELL. 

ell. In the first place, when Lowell sprang into being, it was at a leap. 
There had never been such a leap in the whole history of the towns 
and cities of the United States. When this city thus sprang into 
being, it was unprecedented. Chicago has made great leaps, and made 
great boasts of it, since. San Francisco has made great leaps ; but 
Lowell made the first leap, and it was a marvel all over the land, that 
a city should have grown up here almost in a night, — a city so grand 
as Lowell was, even in its earlier days. Then, was it ever heard of be- 
fore, that a manufacturing corporation built a church and a rectory at 
its own expense, and for a series of years gave the use of both free ? I 
h-'ow that in Rhode Island there are cases where churches are in great 
11;, asure sustained by the gentlemen who own the property, but I 
never heard of an instance precisely anologous to the present. Then, 
again, the intense interest manifested in public education, to which 
reference has already been made, was a point upon which I had in- 
tended to dwell, but it is not necessary now. Lowell stands pre-emi- 
nent for enterprise, for intelligence, and for high morals ; and it is the 
church and the school that have done it. Do any of you remember 
that marvellous procession of parasols that filed through your streets 
when Gen. Jackson visited Lowell in 1833? There never was such a 
procession before ; there never will be again. And what did that pro- 
cession of p&rasols indicate ? It indicated this fact : that women and 
girls, might be engaged as operatives in mills, and yet carry them- 
selves like ladies ; dress and appear like ladies ; have all the high tone 
which belongs to ladies, and perhaps know more than some ladies 
know, and these educated women were earning their bread by the la- 
bor of their hands in the factories. 

But I will not go on. It is getting late, and there are others to 
follow. Lowell is a typical place. It is typical of intelligence, morals, 
and sound religion. The world is to be set forward, not only by moral, 
but by material influences. The world is to be set forward, in a certain 
degree, and in a certain way, by machinery, which increases the 
amount of production, and in great measure supersedes the need of 
human toil ; so that all this thunder of revolving wheels, and this whirl 
of spindles, and this rattle of looms, and this clang of ponderous ham- 
mers, sound in my ear like the Inauguration March of a new and 
grander epoch. 



The President. — We have with us on this occasion a gentleman 
well known from his connection with the agricultural and horticultural 



MR. WILDER' S ADDRESS. 61 

societies of our country, but he comes here to-day as the President of the 
New England Historic-Genealogical Society, and he is the especial 
guest of the city on this occasion. I have now the pleasure of intro- 
ducing to you the Hon. Marshall P. Wilder, of Boston. 



ADDRESS 

By Hon. Marshall P. Wilder. 

Mr. Mayor : I thank you for the very kind manner in which you 
have introduced me to this audience. It is true that I am here as one 
of the representatives of the New England Historic-Genealogical So- 
ciety, whose duty and especial province it is to treasure up, record and 
preserve everything that appertains to the history of our own beloved 
New England, to whose welfare Lowell has contributed so largely. But 
after the eloquent historical discourse by Gen. Butler, and the interest- 
ing address by Bishop Clark on the moral influences of this city, there 
is not a word left to be said by me in either direction. I rejoice most 
heartily in the growth and prosperity of the city of Lowell, the fore- 
runner and pioneer, as you have heard to-day, not only in the great 
industrial pursuit to which New England is so much indebted, but 
also in those moral influences by which it has sought to elevate the 
girls and women who are employed here, instead of depressing them, 
as is too often the case in other countries. I coincide heartily with the 
remarks of Bishop Clark on that subject. 

It was not my good fortune to be born in Lowell, but I am proud 
to say, that my birth was only a few miles north, on the border of New 
Hampshire, and from early life I have kept the run of the history of 
Chelmsford and Lowell ; and I am happy to be here and to add a few 
words on this occasion. I was honored, very early in my mercantile 
life in Boston, with the custom of the merchants of Lowell. In fact, I 
can trace back my knowledge of Lowell by the courtesies which have 
been extended to me on many occasions, and (pardon me for saying) 
the many good dinners that I have partaken of here. A remark of 
Gen. Butler brings to my mind the fact, that one of the best dinners 
of which I ever partook in Lowell was from a fresh salmon, at the Co- 
burn House, fifty years ago last June, taken from the waters of the 
Merrimack only about an hour before we sat down to the table. 

One of the great pleasures that I experience to-day is in meeting 
your honored Mayor, whom I have known from a small boy, and when 



62 Sh MI-CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

I came into the hall this forenoon, and saw him addressing that assem- 
bly, it brought to my mind the blessed influences of New England 
education. I believe he was a good boy and hence he has become a 
good man. I have been for nearly forty years connected and interested 
with his respected father in manufactures, who, I bless God, has lived 
to this time, to educate and train up his child in the way he should go ; 
and my heart rises in gratitude to the Giver of all good for the bless- 
ings of education, as illustrated in the gentleman who stands before 
you to-day as example of the beneficent influences of your Lowell 
schools. 

But I must not take up your time. I was very glad to hear the 
orator of the day remind you of the illustrious benefactors who had 
founded our manufacturing cities in New England, to whom we all 
owe, and the whole country owes, a debt of gratitude, and I trust their 
names will ever be remembered among the benefactors of mankind. 
We reflect on what American manufactures have done for New Eng- 
land, we may well take pride in what has been accomplished, and look 
forward to the day when we may be as independent in the products 
of our soil, as we are in the policy of our government. I trust that 
Lowell, may go on, prospering and to prosper, in the future as in the 
past, and be an honor to itself, to the state, and to the country, and a 
blessing to mankind. 



The President. — On the sixth day of March, 1826, the inhabitants 
of the town of Lowell met in their first town meeting at the Coburn 
Tavern. At that meeting, two gentlemen present with us to-day were 
elected upon the first School Committee of Lowell. I knew, as a 
scholar, having attended the various schools of Lowell, that one of them 
was always somewhat of a " terror to evil doers " in school, for when Dr. 
Green was sub-committee of the school, if the master said, "I am going 
to send you to Dr. Green," it struck a chill over that boy, that made 
him good for the whole term. I have the pleasure of introducing to 
you, ladies and gentlemen, Dr. Green, one of the first school-commit- 
tee-men of Lowell, who will relate to you some historical reminiscences 
of our city. 



REMINISCE NSES BY DR. JOHN 6. GREEN. 63 

HISTORICAL REMINISCENCES. 

By Dr. John 0. Green. 

Mr. President : Seven years ago a few gentlemen came together 
in this city to consider the expediency of forming an Association of Old 
Residents to repair old friendships and to collect and treasure up the 
facts and incidents of our local history, so transient yet so interesting, 
so surely and so rapidly heing crowded out of sight. The idea met 
with unexpected and gratifying success. A membership of over two 
hundred, with quarterly meetings and full attendance, and papers of 
value and importance, attest the success of the scheme. The action 
was not premature, for while we have abundant reason for congratula- 
tion in its progress and prosperity and the general favor it has met in 
the community, at nearly every meeting our condolence and sympathy 
are awakened by the deaths of those who, having shared with us the 
active duties and responsibilities of our citizenship, do now rest from 
their labors. A few, very few, who began the half-century with us 
here, are living and present to-day. As we date back to the very in- 
ception of our city, and have been witnesses, and actors, in the grand 
and novel experiment in the history of American manufactures, here 
and then begun, which now we see so triumphantly achieved, can you 
wonder that we meet you to-day and on this occasion with a sympathy 
which is not in the power of my poor words to describe ? I should 
much have preferred to continue to act the part of a grateful listener, 
did not a sense of duty compel me to say a few words of congratulation, 
of retrospection and of warning. 

How little should we have as an impulse to good deeds, or for our 
guidance in life, were it not for the history and traditions which have 
come down to us from former ages, the examples of the great and good, 
of right and wrong, as expressed in the history of nations and the 
lives of men ! 

We speak of Lowell fifty years ago as an experiment. It was 
indeed the first of so many similar enterprises, since undertaken, that 
we are apt to underrate its boldness and novelty; yet undertaken by 
such men, with so much forethought and cautious investigation as were 
sure harbingers of success. 

In 1820 to the minds of Lowell and Jackson and Moody and Ap- 
pleton and Boott, its elements had been so elaborated and its problems 
so demonstrated as to leave little room for hesitation and none for 
doubt. Their portraits, in yonder hall, commemorate them as the 



64 SEMI-CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

founders of the city, and, as in duty bound this day, we recognize the 
city itself as their enduring monument. They were sanguine of suc- 
cess ; hut we only, of to-day, can realize the limit it has reached beyond 
their wildest dreams. 

They seek a place to begin, and Worthen chalks out -upon the 
counting room floor, in Boston, to their admiring eyes, Pawtucket Falls 
and the immense and as was then supposed, the inexhaustible water- 
power of the entire Merrimack. Five of them make a cautious visit to 
the spot. 

In 1821, I quote from an eloquent sermon by Bishop Clark : " I 
remember in my boyhood, my father*, arriving at our home in New- 
buryport, and telling us that at last he had been able to effect the pur- 
chase of certain farms in old Chelmsford which he had been requested 
by a few gentlemen in Boston to buy in his own name and then trans- 
fer to them The reason which led to his employment, in this ser- 
vice, carries us back to the latter part of the last century. The firm, 
in which he, as a young man. held the office of clerk, had con- 
tracted to build the old canal around the Falls of the Merrimack, with 
a view to the improvement of navigation ; but soon after entering upon 
this work, a very formidable operation in those days, they failed in th e 
business and he was thereupon employed as an agent to superintend 
the completion of this design. The familiarity which this labor gave 
him, both with the general features of the region and with individuals 
resident there, led to the subsequent engagement to which I have 
alluded. The place where your splendid city now stands, was then a 
swampy and not over productive piece of land and various were the 
speculations as to his purpose in purchasing so large a quantity of such 
an undesirable territory ; the final conclusions being that he intended 
to establish an enormous tan yard which would probably be his ruin. 
It was considered so problematical whether he would eventually be 
able to pay the extravagant price which he offered for a certain portion 
of the land that the owner demanded a bond of indemnity to be signed 
by a distinguished lawyer in the vicinity, amounting to the sum of 
two hundred dollars, in case the deed of sale should be returned upon 
his hands ; the good man intimating to his friends his strong persua- 
sion that the purchaser was probably insane." 

In 1822, in April, Kirk Boott arrives and the great work begins, 
with an energy and determination which were in strong contrast to 
the quiet habits of an old New England town like Old Chelmsford. 

* Thomas M. Clark, Esq. 



REMINISCENCES BY DR. JOHN 0. GREEN. 65 

Never was a man better adapted for the position in which he was 
placed, by natural ability, by early education, by decision of character, 
by the most perfect devotion and unselfish consecration to the grand 
enterprise before him. He was thirty-two years of age. He spoke in 
an undertone, always in few words, directly to the point. Either natu- 
rally, or acquired by his military education, he had a commanding 
manner which never, to me, seemed misplaced, but appropriate to the 
position of superintendent of a vast multiplicity of affairs and a large 
number of men. His orders were given with briefness and precision 
and he expected the same in reply. When you reflect on the character 
of the old settlers here at the time, you will not wonder that these 
characteristics were often misunderstood by them, that his directness 
was mistaken for haughtiness and his energy for overbearing. HLs 
situation was novel. No similar enterprise had been undertaken. To 
be sure he had able assistants selected for the different parts of it, yet 
he it was, who, in all doubts, was called upon to advise and decide. 
The interests of the Merrimack Company, the only company at that 
time, and those of individual land owners, the greedy speculators in 
real estate, the large contractors and the selection of suitable overseers 
of work were seldom identical or easily reconciled. His prompt' and 
curt replies did not always at first command a cheerful acquiescence. 
Yet under strong provocations he was always dignified and gentle- 
manly. His knowledge of men seemed almost like intuition. Under 
its promptings were collected here a noble band of mechanics. Men 
not only skilled craftsmen but men of incorruptible integrity whose 
lives were passed here and whose faithful works are all around us. The 
variety of his employments and the versatility of his talents almost ex- 
ceed belief. He was engineer, architect, draughtsman, conveyancer, 
clerk, moderator of town meeting, usually by a unanimous vote; rep- 
resentative to the legislature, receiving one hundred and one votes out 
of one hundred and six, and a review of all his work in these depart- 
ments would only go to show a remarkable correctness of judgment 
and wise forethought. Enthusiastic in the great problem to whose 
solution his whole soul was devoted, his labors scarcely knew any dimi- 
nution, even after they were interrupted by his failing health, and were 
ended by his death in 1837, at the early age of forty-six years and four 
months. 

In 1823 in September, the great wheel on the Merrimack corpo- 
ration began to revolve ; in November the first cloth was returned and 
the hum of machinery commenced only to be intensified and multi- 
plied in ceaseless motion from that day to this, for more than fifty 



66 SEMI-CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

years. And here a single fact speaks volumes to the honor of all the 
leaders and agents of these magnificent corporations. They are, it is 
said, soulless, but from that day to this, in peace and war, amidst the 
distractions of trade, the misfortunes of commerce, individual losses 
and corporate bankruptcy in other places, here the monthly payments 
to every individual person in their employ have never been dishonored 
or postponed for a single day. 

It was in the autumn of this year eleven acres were carefully pre- 
pared and planted with acorns to supply the demand for white oak 
timber in coming years. 

In 1824, before the first mill had been three months in operation, 
the directors bad decided to provide for public worship for the people 
in their employ, and as soon as a suitable place could be prepared for 
them to assemble the Rev. Rector of St. Anne's was appointed to the 
position he has so long and so honorably (illed. " In his presence," 
said Bishop Clark in 186;"), " we cannot saj^ all we would of his patient, 
laborious, faithful ministry amongst you. The sun has not been more 
regular in his rising and setting than he has been in his daily round 
of duties. 

u ' At his approach complaint grew mild ; 

And when his hand unbarred the shutter, 
The clammy lips of fever smiled 

The welcome which they could not utter.' " 

ISTo storm has ever raged which he would not cheerfully face when 
the call of tire sufferer summoned him from his fireside ; no Sunday has 
ever dawned when the doors of St. Anne's have not been opened to the 
worshipper ; no heavy-laden sinner ever asked his counsel and was sent 
uncomforted away. 

"It was in this year," says Mr. Bachelder, " I well remember the 
prediction of Mr. Patrick Jackson. He remarked that their purchase 
of real estate at the Falls comprised about as many acres as were con- 
tained in the original territory of Boston before it was extended by 
encroachments on the tide waters ; and," he continued, " if our plans 
succeed as we have reason to expecb, we shall have as large a popula- 
tion on our territory in twenty years as we had in Boston twenty years 
ago." 

This language from a sane, calculating business man appeared 
too extravagant for belief, but his expectations were more than re- 
alized. In 1804 the population of Boston was 26,000. In 1844 the 
population of Lowell must have been 28,000. By the state census in 
1845 it was 28,841. 



REMINISCENCES BY DR. JOHN O. GREEN. 67 

In 1825, attracted by the fame of the new town, the editor of the 
Essex Gazette makes a journey from Salem and August 12 in his paper 
thus portrays his astonishment : " As we ascended the high grounds 
which lie on the side of the Merrimack, the beautiful valley which has 
been chosen for the site of the manufacturing establishment opened 
upon our view. It is indeed a fairy scene. Here we beheld an ex- 
tensive city, busy, noisy and thriving, with immense prospects of 
increasing extent and boundless wealth. Everything is fresh and 
green with the vigor of youth, yet perfect in all the strength of man- 
hood. It reminds us of a Russian spring which starts, as it were, from 
the silence and desolation of winter into all the luxuriance and life and 
motion of summer. It seems as if the imagination was transported 
into the regions of antiquity among the Asiatic monarchs, who com- 
manded cities to rise up and be built in a day. What cannot a combi- 
nation of genius, wealth and industry produce ! At the distance of 
about two miles above the factories are Pawtucket Falls, or rather rap- 
ids. Here the river precipitates itself over an immense bed of solid 
rocks which extend, from side to side, for the distance of a mile. The 
whole river is white with foam. No boat can pass these rapids, and 
this very circumstance which, for ages, has been considered an irre- 
mediable misfortune has been made a source of wonderful improvement 
and a benefit to the whole country. A canal commencing above the 
falls and winding in a semi-circular course for about two miles termin- 
ates by two locks at Concord River. A short cut from the centre of 
this canal into the Merrimack furnishes an infinite water-power, and 
this simple contrivance is the whole of the wonder-working power 
which has created a flourishing town in as short a time as is required 
in some places to build a log-house. On the banks of the Merrimack 
are already three superb factories and two immense piles of brick buil- 
dings for calico printing. In front of these, on the banks of the factory 
canal which is fenced in and ornamented with a row of elms, are situ- 
ated the houses for the people. They are handsomely and uniformly 
painted and are beautifully ornamented with flower gardens in front 
and separated by wide avenues. There is a beautiful Gothic stone 
church opposite the dwelling houses and a parsonage of stone is erect- 
ing. There is a post office, fine taverns, one of which is a superb stone 
edifice with out-buildings of the same material, and perhaps two hun- 
dred houses all fresh from the hands of the workmen. The ground is 
intersected with fine roads and good bridges, The whole seems like 
the work ot enchantment. 

" About three hundred persons, two thirds of whom are females, 



68 SEMI-CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL 

young women from the neighboring towns, are emplo} T ed. The women 
earn from a dollar to two dollars a week according to skill. We stood 
gazing at this fairy vision at the distance of a mile. The roar of the 
water falls is intermingled with the hum and buz of the machinery. 
Sometimes it would raise its voice above the roar of the waters and 
then die away and be lost and mingled with them in harmony. It 
seemed to be a song of triumph and exultation at the successful union 
of nature with the art of man, in order to make her contribute to the 
wants and happiness of the human family.'" 

In 1826 the population reached twenty-three hundred and here 
were all the conditions for the training of character. A small popula- 
tion, all known to each other, nearly enough upon a level to be anima- 
ted by a common sympathy, all laboring for a livelihood, and therefore 
industrious in habits and simple in manners, no one could live in such 
a community without special incitements to a love of order and public 
spirit. And when from the inconvenience of four miles distance from 
Chelmsford post office and town meetings, those parliaments as they 
have been called for the free discussion of all questions touching the 
interests of the people and organs of popular communication with their 
riders, the new town was incorporated, the election of its officers was 
with singular unanimity, a body of representative men — Nathaniel 
"Wright, Samuel Batchelder and Oliver M. Whipple as selectmen, one 
of whom only survives, laden with years and honors. 

In marked contrast to the town election was the city election, ten 
years later. The population in the territory having increased from 
200 to 17,633 in sixteen years, the strife of political parties was never 
more angry, which resulted in placing in the Mayor's chair the amiable 
and talented Bartlett, whose vindication of Lowell operatives, if he had 
never written anything else, would entitle him to the gratitude of every 
Lowell citizen. 

The age in which we have been privileged to live, is indeed a 
wonderful one, for within our half century, in common with the whole 
civilized world almost, we glory in the invention of the cotton gin, the 
railroad, the electric telegraph, the ocean cable and the use of anaesthe- 
tics for the abolition of pain. 

When many of us came here, we had a weekly mail from Boston, 
brought on horseback from Billerica. Soon after an enterprising stage 
company took us to Boston in four hours ; and the Middlesex Canal 
boat in five hours ; and now, in that length of time, an answer by 
telegram can be had from the remotest city in Europe. Look now at 



REMINISCENCES BY DR. JOHN 0. GREEN. 69 

our magnificent mills with eight hundred thousand spindle*, and read 
the experience of one of our old residents, now present with us to-daj' : 

" I was one of five small children, the oldest not eleven years old. 
We had cotton brought to our house by the bale, to pick to pieces and 
get out the seeds and dirt. We children had to pick so many pounds 
per day as a stint. We had a whipping machine made four square ; 
and about three feet from the floor was a bed cord run across from 
knob to knob, near together, on which we put a parcel of cotton, and 
with two whipstocks we lightened it up and made it ready for the 
card." 

Indeed, we old residents seldom have a meeting at which similar 
contrasts are not elicited. 

Our career of progress and prosperity thus reflects the lustre of 
sagacity upon the founders of our city. It does more. To them be- 
loi iLi - the honor of a high moral purpose. They were determined 
Lowell should not be a stain on the fair fame of our Commonwealth. 
For this purpose they established a wise system of business, and by 
various means in their power fostered good order, temperance, purity, 
schools and churches, intending to make the city an honor to Massa- 
chusetts, and a model to other manufacturing villages which might rise 
up. '' Their works praise them in the gate." 

No large portion of the population of New England, commercial 
or rural, has enjoyed more of the substantial comforts of life, and, on 
the whole, better intellectual and moral advantages, and long may the 
place be worthy of the title given it by Edward Everett, in his memoir 
of Francis Cabot Lowell, from whom it derives its name, "The Noble 
City of the Arts." 

The triumphs of our city and its many causes of self glorification 
for the last fifty years must be left to younger voices. And now, in 
taking our farewell of the last semi-centennial we older men shall ever 
see, allow us to say in fifty years we have grown materially great and 
developed vast resources and improvements. We can show our visitors 
our immense factories and machine shops filled with the most perfect 
machinery, our broad streets, our palatial school houses, our handsome 
churches, our magnificent water works. But there are other things 
which we ought to show ; we ought to show that a self governed and 
free people can be a power and example for all good upon the earth. 

Let those upon whom the destinies of the city now devolve, see 
to it that that power of moral prestige which once made the young 
town so attractive in the esteem of our neighbors' be not forfeited and 
lost. 



70 SEMI-CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

"The country," saj's one of our public men, "will in a few 
months resound with eulogy of those who had founded the Republic; 
but those old patriots, if they could, would tell us to spend a little less 
in our efforts in praising them and a little more in following their ex- 
ample." 



Tli h President. — I have been endeavoring to prevail upon cur old 
Grammar School master, Seth Pooler, to come upon the stand, but he 
says he will not come. I know you will be glad to hetir'from one wl o 
was associated with Lowell for several years as pastor of one of our 
churches and therefore I introduce to you the Rev. Dr. Miner. 



ADDRESS 

By Rev. A. A. Miner, D. D, 

I am devoutly thankful, fellow citizens, for the honor and privilege 
of looking into your faces on this semi-centennial occasion. I recall a 
few reminiscences (I will not detain you long,) of the years from 1842 
to 1848, when I was connected, as you have been told, with one of the 
churches here. I represented them, as I represent to-day, the heretical 
side of theology ; — in theory now, in theory and practice then. And 
I found, I need not tell you, in the year 1842, and thenceforward, a 
very lively state of things in the theological world in Lowell. I had 
been immediately preceded by the Rev. Abel C. Thomas, whose skill 
and rigor as a christian warrior has but lately declined with the decline 
of his physical powers. He had been preceded by a gentleman whose 
venerable face I see before me, the Rev. Zenas Thompson, who had 
bee: 1 , mainly instrumental in the building of the church in which I had 
the honor to minister. There were gathered in that church, in those 
days, mostly young men and women, the flower of New England. I 
never spoke to a congregation which I more thoroughly enjoyed. Wide 
awake always. If I had ever seen man or woman asleep in that assem- 
bly, I should have believed that the stove was leaking gas, or that some 
other calamity was impending. We have been told to-day by the ora- 
tor, that about everybody, in those days worked for day wages. I believe 
there was not a man or woman in my congregation who did not depend 
on his day wages for support. If there was any exception, it was that 



DR. MINER'S ADDRESS. 71 

of the late Alexander Wright, Superintendent of the Lowell Corpora- 
tion ; and he, being a salaried man, was, I think, no exception. A noble 
man. There was in that body of men and women as much generous 
self-sacrifice as was ever found in any body of people of like means and 
resources. They built the church out of their own hard earnings. 
Whatever may have happened since, they never asked another man to 
pay their debts. They were men and women keenly alive to every de- 
mand of honor, to every demand of justice and of fidelity. 

There were in the city of Lowell in those days renowned theolo- 
gians. I recall the Rev. Dr. Porter, in the church near by ; and the 
excellent Rev. Dr. Thayer, of the First Universalist Church. There 
were everal Methodist clergymen of repute here in those days : the 
Rev. Luther Lee, whose keen, sharp sword never had its edge turned, 
as he thought, the Rev. Dr. B Ian chard, who has gone to his rest ; the 
Rev. S. W. Hanks, of keen, incisive thought; and, I need not say, the 
venerable divine on my right, who moved as calmly then as now, and 
whatever were the theological strifes and encounters without, I do not 
recollect that a gun was ever heard from him outside of his own fort. 

Those were days when almost every man and woman who walked 
the streets of Lowell, was alive to the highest interest of the city. 
You have heard much to-day on the subject of education, and having 
been entrusted during niy residence here, with a brief term of service 
in the School Committee of the city of Lowell, I had the honor of 
meeting these two men, who have done more than any others to plant 
fashion, mould, uphold and perpetuate the educational interests of 
Lowell. There was more than one warm discussion in yonder com- 
mittee room. The six did not always agree in one ; mostly however, 
in two. These men who were persistent (they will permit me to say) 
in their convictions, by the very inertia of that persistence, general^' 
executed their thought ; and if they even failed, it was because four 
were more than two. I look into the faces of gentlemen and of ladies 
who were teachers then, and some of whom are teachers yet in Lowell, 
I recall the name of the late Jacob Graves, who taught in 3 r onder 
Grammar School, and whom I recollect of visiting for the first time as 
a member of the School Committee, when I was struck with the quiet 
and placid state of affairs in the school, the loving face that everything 
wore, with the beautiful penmanship that was exhibited, and with the 
very satisfactory condition, though apparently free from all constraint, 
that prevailed on every hand ; and it occurred to me, while I was wit- 
nessing the progress of affairs, that I once had a teacher by the name 
of Graves in Franklin, New Hampshire, — a sub-teacher under Prof. 



72 bEMI-CENTENMAL OF LOWELL. 

Tyler in the Academy there, when I was a lad of sixteen or seventeen. 
A second thought reminded me that he was an excellent penman ; and 
I turned and looked at the master, and the impression stole over me, 
and grew more and more authoritative with me, that he must he the 
same man. In the remarks which I made at the close of the exercises, 
I spoke to the school of the very pleasant state of affairs, the genial 
aspect which everything wore, and the gratification I had felt in the 
exercises of the school; and remarked to them that it recalled a teacher 
of whom I had some knowledge many years hefore, that my teacher 
was a good penman, as was their's ; he was a very genial man as was 
theirs ; and it might strike them as a singular co-incidence that his 
name was Graves, as was theirs ; and if I was not greatly mistaken, 
although the thought had never dawned upon me until within the 
hour, their teacher and my teacher was the same man. i then turned 
to Mr. Graves and asked him if he was not an assistant with Prof. 
Tyler at the Academy in Franklin, 1ST. H., such a year, and he said 
that he was, hut it had never occurred to him that I was a pupil in 
that school. It was a pleasant surprise to us hoth. 

I have never ceased to rememher with affection and admiration 
the faithful toil of the men and women whom I knew as teachers in 
Lowell ; and when I come to appreciate the comprehensive judgment 
the wise thought, and the high skill, of the venerable men who helped 
to found and shape the schools, and who have watched them from the 
beginning until now, I am not at all surprised that the schools of 
Lowell stand unexcelled, not to say unequalled. 

I remember Lowell, too, as a community awake to every moral in- 
terest. I think I may safely say I have never known a people any 
where more keenly alive, or more prompt to respond, to suggestions 
touching the moral welfare of the community than the people of Lowell 
at the period of which I speak. There are gentlemen in this 
city, — I see one before me now, — with whom I used to toil in the 
temperance cause. I do not know but that since that hour, one or the 
other of us, I will not to-day undertake to say which, has fallen from 
grace, but as we are foreordained to be saved, I think whichever it is, 
he will be recovered. 

I remember, too, in those days of anti-slavery conflict, how a 
neighboring hall (for this hall did not then exist), used to ring with 
the discussions upon that subject. I recall especially one memorable 
occasion there, when a series of resolutions was offered that would 
seem to annihilate the American Union and the American Church at 
a dash ; such as — First, — The church of Christ, — like its Divine Head, 



DR. MINER'S ADDRESS. 73 

is, and ever was, opposed to all iniquity, injustice and wrong. Second- 
ly,— Any church not thus opposed to all iniquit}-, injustice and wrong, 
is not a branch of the church of Christ, hut a spurious and rival combi- 
nation. Thirdly, — The American Church, judged by this standard is 
a spurious and rival combination; and it therefore becomes, a Christian 
and patriotic duty to seek its utter and entire overthrow. That 
seemed to be perfectly logical and conclusive. After two days of hot 
conflict, the clergy having been charged with being "dumb dogs," for 
allowing the church to be thus excoriated without daring to reply, a 
clergyman went upon the platform and said : " The first proposition 
is not true. The church of Christ is not, and never was, u like its 
divine head," opposed to all iniquity, injustice and wrong. It has al- 
ways been charged with delinquency and unfaithfulness. Even the 
Apostolic churches, by this logic would be overthrown. Some of them, 
like the church at Corinth, were charged with sins not even named 
among the Gentiles ; and the seven churches of Asia are all described as 
lukewarm and defective in one way or another. The church of Christ is 
not and never was entirely and thoroughly like its Divine He&d ; but 
it is and always has been aiming to become like its Divine Head." 
And so the stormy debate rolled on. It was alleged that at the last 
moment, when there was no opportunity for reply, a defence of the 
church was being made. It chanced that the parish committee of the 
church yonder was in session at that time. A message was sent to 
that committee asking that the church might be put at the command 
of its pastor the next day; and when a speaker from the platform alleged 
that the clergy were unfair, knowing the hall could no longer be had, 
and challenged them to open their churches and continue their defence, 
it was announced that that church would be open the following day, 
and the discussion be continued. Such were some of the stormy dis- 
cussions of those days. 

Now one word as to the inference which I draw from the example 
of the people of Lowell, and I will relieve you. When the civil war 
broke out, you all know how Lowell distinguished herself, under the 
lead of the orator of the day. The first bloodshed in the conflict was 
shed by Lowell men in the streets of Baltimore, and Lowell men were 
the first to arrive in the city of Washington for the defence of the 
national capitol. A few weeks before, when it was apparent that war 
was inevitable, in conversation one evening with two of the most 
wealthy merchants of Boston, one of whom, still living in ripe old age, 
being foreign born, and educated under the influences of the East, a 
noble man, in a tone of utter despair, said, " oh, your country will go 



74 SEMI-CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL 

to ruin. Your government is no government; it exists only on paper; 
it has no strength, and a rebellion of this magnitude cannot be con- 
trolled. We may as well give it over; for, look you," said he, "what 
can you do with populations like that of Lowell, where dividends will 
control the capitalist, where the need of daily bread will rule the 
operative, and where, therefore, you can have no support, no power." 
I said to this noble man, ; ' I have had the honor to live in Lowell six 
years, and I believe there are no people on the face of the earth whose 
hearts will respond more promptly to the call of duty, or who will fol- 
low more quickly the impulses of high Christian patriotism, than the 
population of Lowell. I do not believe that our government is one of 
paper merely. I believe that it is a government that stands behind 
more bayonets, in proportion to population, and is backed by more 
Christian patriotism to-day, than any king on the face of the earth 
can boast of." How grandly these statements were verified you all 
know. 



POEM 

By John - S. Colby. 



"If this counsel or this work be of men, it will come to nought 
But if it be of God, ye can not overthrow it." — Books of Acts, v 
38, 39. 

I. 

"Arms do I sing !" the Latin poet* cries, 
And in majestic measure to our eyes 
Unfolds the glittering panoply of wars, 
The deeds of blood-stained heroes, and their 

scars. 
Full oft have other poets, small and great, 
Called down the Muses from their lofty state, 
Lines to indite with crimson-colored pen, 
To chant sweet strains and drown the wail of 

men. 

Not thus to-day would we implore their aid; 
Better, by far, the task alone essayed 

* Virgilius. 



MR. COLBY'S POEM. 75 

In mortal weakness, without heavenly fire, 
Our hearts to quicken and our tongues inspire. 
Yet one there is among the Sister Nine 
Whose melody is none the less divine — 
Thalia called — in whom dwells kindly love — 
A gentle daughter, sprung from Thundering 
Jove. 

Her would we seek to he a guest this day, 
And with her potent influence grace our lay. 
Not then shall martial sounds engross our mind ; 
But, with our grateful thoughts toward Heaven 

inclined, 
The angel host our very souls shall thrill 
With the glad message — " Peace on earth ! Good 

will !" 

II. 

An Eastern legend, writ for childish ear, 
Relates (what you will scarce believe, I fear) 
That there was once a mat of virtue rare, 
Which swiftly bore its owner through the air 
For countless leagues, o'er river, mountain, 

sea, 
Concealed from others, and from danger free. 

A richer prize than this we all may claim, 
And Memory, void of magic, is its name. 
With speed of thought it bridges over time, 
And wafts us gently to another clime. 
I pray you, now, embark upon its wings 
And backward fly, till into sight it brings 
The mysteries of Fifty Years Agone, 
When into life this goodly town was born. 
Review, with me, the hallowed scenes of yore, 
Assured that none the journey will deplore. 

III. 

When the ancient Roman mother held her child 

upon her knee, 
Him she taught to worship Jove and "Father 

Tiber" reverently. 



76 SEMI-CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

Prostrate falls the pagan Hindoo on the mighty 
Ganges' banks ; 

From it earthly blessings craveth, to it render- 
eth his thanks. 

Egypt's swarthy sons and daughters homage 
paid to sluggish Nile, 

As the Christian seeks devoutly for his Heavenly 
Father's smile. 

And, although these sacred honors our unsen- 
tient streams must lack, 

Yet the welkin loud shall echo of the lordly 
Merrimack ; 

Ring, the skies, with shouts exultant for the 
placid Concord's tide ; 

For Lowell is the natural offspring of this hap- 
py groom and bride ! 

Thus, while we, with hearts o'erflowing, cele- 
brate our Jubilee, 

They together softly gliding whisper of us to 
the sea ; 

Proudly boast us as their best-loved, yet forget 
not as they sport 

Their three other buxom daughters — Lawrence, 
Haverhill, Newburyport. 

Children these of whom they well may quote 
Cornelia's fond reply : 

" These our jew T els are, Nations ! Lucre 
these could never buy !" 

Filial gratitude return we ! May their life-blood 
never cease, 

And the passing years bring nought to inter- 
rupt their wedded peace ! 

IV. 

" Glorious things of thee are spoken, Zion, City 
of our God !" 

Sang the Psalmist in his rapture, as famed Sa- 
lem's streets he trod. 

And as we shall scan the features of the sturdy 
little band 

Who with patience laid foundations here forev- 



MR. COLBY'S POEM. 77 

ermore to stand, 

Start those words with honest impulse, unre- 
strained by doubts or fears, 

As with fadeless bays we crown them, withered 
not by lapse of years. 

They upreared no splendid Temple, such as 
David's vision viewed ; 

Offered up no sacrifices ; reveled not in pleni- 
tude. 

They built not around our borders mural walls 
of massive stone, 

Nor the Presence of Jehovah claimed to be with 
them alone ; 

But with humble, modest labor sought to bene- 
fit their race, 

Quite content if fickle Fortune did not wholly 
hide her face. 

"Beautiful for situation, joy of earth shall this 
be called !" 

Was the language of their firm faith, by no ob- 
stacle appalled. 

Ay ! if he has earned our tributes who has 
caused from earth to spring 

Only one slight blade of grass, in spot where 
erst was no green thing, 

Think you not those men and women have eter- 
nal praises won 

That shall swell in future ages and the conquer- 
or's fame outrun ? 

Priest and Prophet, Sage and Warrior, each 
may win a wide renown, 

But he earns a nobler paean who in peace doth 
plant a town ! 

Y 

No de mi-god, or nursling of the wolf, 

Laid deep and strong the bases of our homes ; 

We burn no incense to their memories ; 
No mausoleum towers above their tombs ; 

No sculptured column tells their gallant deeds 
In glowing verse, to heedless passers-by ; 



78 SEMI-CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

But on our walls their graces are inscribed, 
And from our hearts their names shall never 



Who can forget the men who cast their all — 

Their art, their industry, their moderate 
wealth — 
Into the balance of stern Destiny, 

And won her bounties not by secret stealth ; 
But with the brawny arm, the active mind, 

The consecrated soul and tireless will, 
Strove here to bless their fellow humankind, 

Raising together Church, and School, and Mill I 

Then laurels render unto Hale and Boott, 
To Lawrence, Jackson, Appleton and 
Hurd ! 
Giants were they among the sons of men, 
And, like th' Apostles, grand in deed and 
word. 
Let praise be sung to Howe and Whipple 

quaint, 
To Dutton, Moody and their comrades all, 
To Nesmith, Francis, Worthen, Colburn : 

these 
Shall future generations high extol. 
Yet chief among them our godfather stands, 

Like Saul amid the Hebrew congregation; 
And Francis Cabot Lowell's name shall 
live — 
A household word and lasting inspiration ! 

VI. 

Fast rose the structures of colossal size, 

Guided by men of genius such as these, 
Till spindle, loom and shuttle ready stood 

To execute the mind's sublime decrees. 
They dedicated not to frowning gods 

Their skill ; no vestal virgins fed the fire 
To satiate a mystic deity 

And turn away his dreaded, vengeful ire. 

No ! These were temples, but not futile ones, 



MR. COLBY'S POEM. 

To superstition nurse, and blind the soul : 
Temples were they for mnn's advantage planned, 

And served by priestesses not clad in stole ! 
God dwelleth not in houses made with hands, 
When decked with human pride and vain dis- 
play. 
But wheresoe'er He finds a suppliant heart, 
And where man's good is sought from day to 
day. 

VII. 

To those who love the Lord, saith Holy Writ, 

And, loving Him, their brother-man do love, 
All tilings shall work together toward good, 

And even seeming evil useful prove. 
To-day our city is a monument 

That emphasizeth well that blissful faith ; 
For though dark clouds have ofttimes lowered 
round, 

Onward and upward hath she trod her path. 

From wilderness, where roamed the dusky band 

Of Wamesits, whom Eliot yearned to save ; 
From rural precinct which the generous towns 

Of Chelmsford, Tewksbury and Dracut gave ; 
From low estate as village, have we grown 

By swift degrees to city rank and station — 
Proud of our history, our mammoth mills, 

Our maidens fair and — of our population ! 

When rang the tocsin of the dreadful strife 

That for a time armed brother against brother, 
First offering made we for the Nation's life, 
And first foul Treason leaped our sons to 
smother. 
But when Sweet Peace once more returned to 
earth, 
And sheathed the sword too long imbrued in 
gore, 
None learned more quickly to forgive the wrong, 
And heal the gaping wound forevermore ! 



80 SEMICENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

viir. 

Praise God ! our Fiftieth Anniversary 

Brings no forebodings to us, of decay; 
No deadly fever lurks within our veins — 

No slow consumption wastes our strength 
away. 
Clear is our brain ; our conscience free from 
guile ; 

Our hands are busy as the tossing main. 
We stand upon the very verge of youth, 

Eager a loftier pinnacle to gain. 

The lesson of the Past we read with joy ; 

Brilliant the retrospective view appears; 
And, catching up the armor of the dead ; 

We look with hope far into coming years, 
Thus far the Lord hath bountifully blessed ; 

Let this our confidence and faith enhance. 
Placing our puny hand in His, so strong, 

Besound the word aloncr the line — " Advance !"• 



LETTEB FBOM HON SETH AMES. 

Brookline, February 24, 1876. 
Charles Cowley, Esq., Chairman of Committee of Arrangements : 

Dear Sir, — I find, greatly to my regret, that certain official en- 
gagements, which cannot be postponed, will make it impossible for me 
to join in the proposed celebration of the semi-centennial anniversary 
of the municipal incorporation of Lowell. To a man of my age, the 
recurrence of any special anniversary must have a serious aspect, but 
such an anniversary as this is of a peculiar interest. There will be few 
present at your celebration whose acquaintance with Lowell goes back 
to a remoter date than mine. It was there that I spent nearly twenty- 
one years of my life. It was there that my children were born. I 
there formed some of the most valuable friendships of my life, and I 
am proud to say that during my residence there I received not a few 
very gratifying tokens of confidence and good opinion from my %iiow- 
citizens. In September, 1828, when I took up my abode there, Lowell 
was but a scattered and somewhat unsightly village. All w«s in prom- 
ise and expectation, and I have often had occasion to reflect that among 



JUDGE AMES' LETT.ETR. 81 

the anticipations as to its future growth and prosperity, those which 
seemed the most wild and extravagant have proved the most correct. 

At that time, the whole of the east side of Central Street, from 
Frye's Tavern to the Washington House was occupied with a row 
of remarkably shabby wooden buildings, most of which have disap* 
peared. There were a few houses on Chapel Hill ; — on the north side 
of Merrimack Street stood the Episcopal church and parsonage, and 
two other buildings occupied as dwelling houses, viz : the princely 
mansion of Kirk Boott (which has since migrated to another part of the 
city), and the residence of Mr. Prince, which is still standing. 
Lowell Street had not been laid out, and the works of excavating 
the upper canal was perhaps half completed. Pedestrians, in going 
from Central Street toward the Episcopal church, usually made a short 
cut across what was then an open field between Merrimack and the 
present Middle Street. There was also a cluster of houses and shops 
in Belvidere, which was then a part of Tewksbury, and which, by its 
often defeated and often renewed efforts to be annexed to Lowell, fur- 
nished almost annual excitement, until the success of the, project 
calmed all agitation. 

I found the field occupied by five lawyers, not one of whom is now 
living, viz : Nathaniel Wright, Elisha Glidden, John B. Adams, Luke 
Eastman, and John P. Bobinson. The principal business of a lawyer 
in those days was the collection of debts, and as the law then stood the 
body or the debtor was a sort of collateral security for the debt, and 
the number of suits for the collection of small debts was very large. 
The magistrate whom I found in possession of substantially a monopoly 
of that department of the judiciary was Esq. Hildreth, who lived in 
Dracut, and whose parlors often echoed the thunders of forensic elo- 
quence. His docket was a very large one until another justice sprang 
up in another part of Dracut, who started a formidable opposition. 
Business was not so brisk with me but that I found time to receive 
the visits of a thin and pale looking boy, who was preparing for col- 
lege, and came to me to recite his lessons in Virgil. That boy has 
since made some noise in the world, being no less a person than your 
distinguished fellow citizen, General Butler. If he should ever have 
the misfortune to make a mispronunciation, or false quantity in his 
Latin, he may possibly think that the fault was partly mine. 

The rapid growth of Lowell, and its metropolitan position among 
the manufacturing places of New England, soon attracted to it a large 
number of gentlemen with their families from other places. It would 
have been difficult to find any other place in Massachusetts (Boston 



S2 SEMICENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

alone excepted), which furnished a more cultivated, refined, and charm- 
ing society than was gradually collected in Lowell. Any man who 
lived on terms of friendly intimacy with such men as Pelham W. 
Warren, Luther Lawrence, Elisha Huntington, John Clark, John 
Aiken, and Thomas Hophinson (one of the best men and best lawyers 
that I ever knew), might well be called a fortunate man. It would be 
easy to greatly extend this list of men, not now living, who were dis-, 
tinguished for public spirit and usefulness, as well as for private virtues 
and accomplishments. I might include some now living, but for obvi- 
ous reasons of propriety, I spare their blushes. 

But not to forget the old proverb that brevity is the soul of wit, — 
and that the indulgence allowed to spoken words may not be fairly 
claimed for expressions formally reduced to writing. I have only to 
thank you for your kind invitation, and once more to assure you of my 
regret that I cannot accept it. 

I remain, j-ours sincerely, 

Seth Ames. 



LETTER FROM HOK JOSIAH G. ABBOTT. 

6 Arlington St., Boston". ) 
29th February, 1876. } 

Charles Cowley, Esq., Chairman. 

Dear Sir, — 1 have delayed answering your note, inviting me to 
the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the incorporation of Low- 
ell, hoping and expecting till this morning to be present. I find, how- 
ever, I cannot be with you. I have been kept in the house for the 
last two or three days by a sharp cold, just bad enough to prevent my 
presence with you being any pleasure either to myself or others. 

I regret it very much, as I had promised myself much enjoyment 
from the meeting, with those of my old friends and neighbors, who 
are left. 

As you know, I have passed some of the happiest years of my life 
in Lowell, and with it are connected some of the pleasantest and best 
recollections of the past. 

I took up my residence there soon after leaving college ; there I 
married my wife ; there all my children were born, and there repose 
the ashes of some of them, who so lived and died, that I am sure their 
native city has never had cause to be ashamed of them. 



JUDGE ABBOTT'S LETTER 83 

But my recollections of Lowell does not begin with my residence 
there. 

Let me give you an incident which seem to me to mark the mar- 
vellous growth of your city. I by no means, now, reckon myself 
among the old men, and still when old enough to be permitted with an 
older brother to go off together some three miles to attend a Militia 
Muster, (Musters were then you know prime holidays). I recollect, 
we gave up the delights and attraction of the muster field and soldiers 
and their sham-fights, and trudged off some two miles further, to look 
at the beginning of the place which is now Lowell, and of which I had 
heard so much talk in all the country about. All I could see was one 
of the Merrimack Mills, the walls of which were partly finished, but 
all the surroundings were quiet and even wild enough, with only a few 
hundreds of people, where now you number fifty thousand. 

The recollection of that visit in my early boyood, has alwavs been 
very vivid with me, and at times it is difficult to realize the changes 
going on under my own eyes, in so short a time. It comes, to re-assure 
and comfirm me in the faith I have always had in the progress of our 
dear old Commonwealth, and her increase in strength and power. 
Your city, indeed, is one of the best witnesses, always before us, to the 
falsity of the predictions and croakings we have heard for years about 
the loss in the future, of that power, position and authority, Massachu- 
setts has so far maintained among her sister states — I believe, and 
mean to believe that future is yet, very, very far off. 

My acquaintance with Lowell began in the latter part of 1834, 
when it had a population, I believe, of about twelve thousand. I think 
all who lived there at that time and for the next twenty years, will 
agree with me, in saying that no city of its size, ever contained a more 
remarkable people, or a pleasanter or more cultivated city. I doubt if 
any place of as large a population, ever had within its borders a larger 
number of very able men, who would be marked and remarkable in 
any community. 

The reason of it was, I think, that for some years our state had 
not been especially progressive or prosperous, but on the contrary, 
quiet and even languishing. Our lands, for agriculture, could not 
compete with the abundant fertility of the "West. Our commerce had 
been paralyzed by the war with England, and was slow in recovering. 

Lowell was the real beginning of a new epoch for our state. Here 
was an opening for men of energy, power and activity, who have been 
waiting for an opportunity — and it was improved. 



84 SEMI-CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

At any rate, whether I am right or not in giving the true cause, 
I am sure I am right in saying that Lowell has bad a larger proportion 
of thorough and able men in all the walks of life, than any place of 
the same size has ever known. 

When you can point among your older citizens, who have gone to 
their account, to such names as Boott, Worth en, Moodjr, Colburn, 
Clark, Lawrence, Livingston, Huntington, Bartlett and many others 
of like position and ability, and to as large a number, yet among the 
living, quite as worthy and distinguished no one can well doubt that I 
am fully justified in what I have stated. 

I have said the settlement of Lowell was the beginning of a new 
epoch, and it clearly was so, not only for Massachusetts and New Eng- 
land, but the whole country. It marked the time when we added an- 
other to the great interests of agriculture and commerce. Although 
we of couse had more or less of manufacturing in our borders, and ex- 
periments were beginning to be made on a somewhat larger scale than 
formerly, notably so at Waltham, still I think, Lowell fairly fixes the 
time when manufacturing began to assert its place as one of the great 
interests of the country. From that time it has gone on, increasing 
from year to year, at a rapid rate. 

We hardly stop to consider now how fortunate it was that those 
intrusted with the establishment and management of the mills at Low- 
ell were as wise, prudent and strong as they were proved to be. Al- 
though the manufacturing enterprises established there were really 
experiments, still they were so managed that not one of the large 
establishments promoted by the founders of the city, has failed, as I 
now recollect. They have had their ups and downs, yet have been 
able to go through all the panics and financial storms, without failing 
to meet all their engagements. No one can tell what would have been 
the effect on the manufacturing interest, just struggling for recogni- 
tion, if experiments on a large scale had resulted in failure and loss, 
instead of reasonable success — it might have put us back for years. 

But I must stop ; I only intended to excuse my absence, and I am 
indulging in a great deal of gossip about the past. I could if I had 
time and you had patience, give you many other proofs of my state- 
ments that your city was always remarkable for men among its cit- 
izens of power, wisdom, forecast and patriotism as well. You were al- 
most the first, if not the very first, to try the experiment of the then 
new system of transportation by railways, and as we all know among 
the very first to fully answer all the calls of duty to our common coun- 
try in the darkest hours. 



MR. BATCHELDER'S LETTER. 85 

The history of the first fifty years of Lowell has certainly heen 
marked, and one any city should be proud of. Let us all hope as the 
future is the outcome of the past, that at the end of the next half cen- 
tury her record may he equally good and brilliant. 

Faithfully, 

J. G. Abbott. 



LETTER FROM SAMUEL BATCHELDER. 

Cambridge, February 22, 1876. ) 
Chakles Cowley Esq. ) 

Dear Sir, — I have received your invitation to attend the proposed 
commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of the incorporation of Low- 
ell, and I wish the state of my health was such that I could accept it, 
but I have kept my chamber most of the Avinter, only going out occa- 
sionably for a few hours in pleasant weather. And I am glad to learn 
that there are some of the old residents remaining who are better able 
to enjoy the reminiscences of fifty years ago. 

Considering the facilities of communications by mail and tele- 
graph at the present time, it would hardly be believed, that for the 
first year or more after the incorporation of Lowell, there Avas only a 
mail three times a Aveek from Boston. Mr. Everett was then in Con- 
gress, and I wrote to him that it would be a great convenience to have 
a daily mail, and a change was promptly made to give us sis mails a 
week, but so arranged that we had two mails one day and none the 
next. I wrote again to Mr. Everett, and he immediately had the mat- 
ter corrected, so as to give us a regular daily mail. 

The first establishment of a Savings Bank may deserve some note. 
After one of the Hamilton Mills was in operation I found that those 
in our employ suffered such frequent loss of their rroney by having in 
their boarding houses no safe place to keep it, that I alloAved them to 
deposit it with the Company on interest, and opened a set of books for 
the purpose, on the plan of a Savings Bank. After a time Mr. Nathan 
Appleton suggested that it might be doubtful whether our charter 
Avould authorize this ; I accordingly prepared a petition to the Legisla- 
ture, for the incorporation of a Savings Bank. On receiving the char- 
ter I notified a meeting at my office of the petitioners and any others 
that felt an interest in the subject, to take measures for the acceptance 
of the act of incorporation. According to my recollection there Avere 



86 SEMI-CENTENNIAL OF LOWELL. 

only five persons present, Mi\ Col burn, Mr. Carney, Mr. Nichols, Mr. 
Beard and myself. It was suggested that if so little interest was felt 
in the matter, it was hardly worth while to organize ; but Mr. Carney 
was willing to act as Treasurer, and we concluded to appoint ourselves 
trustees, and make the experiment. A few months after this, the town 
of Lowell decided to build a Town House, and wanted to borrow the 
money for the purpose, which we decided to lend them. The sum, I 
think, was seventeen thousand dollars. This appears to be a very 
humble beginning for an institution whose deposits for many years 
past have been over a million. 

With my best wishes that in future the institutions of Lowell may 
be as successful as they have been in the past. 

I remain very respectfully, 

Samuel Batcheldee. 

P. S. — I am tempted to add some reminiscences of more than fifty 
years ago, being a year or two before the incorporation of Lowell. I was 
at Boston in November, 1824, and in making some preliminary arrange- 
ments for the erection of the Hamilton Mills, before the company was 
organized, it was decided that Mr. John Lowell — who was afterwards 
the founder of the Lowell Institute — Mr. Nathan Appleton and Mr. 
Patrick Jackson should go with me the next morning, to what was 
then East Chelmsford, to decide upon the location of the mills. At 
that time there was no public conveyance through the place, except 
the stage to Concord, N. H, which started from Boston at four o'clock 
in the morning. Mr. Jackson and Mr. Appleton decided to go by the 
stage, but Mr. Lowell thought that instead of starting at that early 
hour, he would go with his horse and chaise the evening before, and 
invited me to ride with him. The subject of our conversation on the 
way was the plans then in operation in England, of organizing com- 
panies for working the silver and gold mines of South America. Mr. 
Lowell was of opinion that the application of English skill and ma- 
chinery and English capital to the business, would make gold and 
silver so plenty as to diminish their value, and this appeared to be a 
very reasonable expectation, but instead of gold and silver becoming 
too plenty, or the parties engaged in those operations becoming 
wealthy, most of them become bankrupt, and neither those enterprises, 
nor the supply from California, have occasioned any diminution in the 
estimation of the precious metals, or been productive of more wealth 
than the cultivation of cotton in the South, or the manufacture of it in 
the North. 



MR. BALL'S LETTER AND POEM. 87 

To return from tliis digression — which you will please to excuse, 
from " narritive old age " of over ninety years. We met the next 
morning on the banks of the canal, which had been excavated and the 
walls built, but the water had not been let in, and the only buildings 
on the west side of Central Street were two dwelling houses. The 
plans were laid out upon paper for four mill sites, between the street 
and the premises afterwards occupied by the Appleton Company. The 
Hamilton Company was the purchaser of two of those mill sites, with 
the privilege of taking two more within a certain time. On examina- 
tion of the ground we concluded to take the two farthest from the 
street, for the reason that the elevation of the ground was such as 
would require less expense and delay in building, than those that were 
nearer the street, and we accordingly, on those sites built our two first 
mills. After I had been at Lowell some time I was satisfied that we 
had made a mistake in our selection, on account of the value of the 
land near the street, of which we had about four acres with each mill 
site, and proposed to Mr. Jackson, who was the President of the Com- 
panjr, that we should decide at once to take the other two mill sites, 
making a statement to show that the land would be worth more than 
we were to give for them, estimating it at seven cents per foot, besides 
the value of the water-power, which might be used on the other mill 
sites. Mr. Jackson thought I estimated the value of the land too 
high. However, we afterwards concluded to take the two mill sites 
next the street, and before I left Lowell, which was in about five yearsj 
we sold some of the land at fifty cents per foot. What the land on 
Central Street may now be worth, some o